Calculation of face milling cost - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug925 View Post
    @ BobW
    That ingersoll mill would rip off 366 cubic in roughly 1.2 minutes. LOL
    So it should cost less than $5.. Not $500. <--- Sarcasm.

    A minute to put it on the machine, 1.2 minutes to machine, a minute to take it off.
    3.2 minutes at $90 an hour. That's a $5 job all day everyday.. Any shop should be
    happy to have that job.. Preferably paid in pennies and nickels, not even in rolls,
    but in a used sandwich bag that has crumbs in it, and a mayonnaise smear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott24898 View Post
    As an average, what is the best calculation of face milling? I have a 4"1/4 A36 plate that needs to be milled to 4". The plate is 24" x 5'1". I'm being told the cost is $500.00. Sounds very high. I would think with the proper cutter it would only take about 20 to 30 minutes to mill 1/4" off. Thought??
    Mid twenties to early thirties is my guess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    I could do this job easy, but no way for 500 bucks... You have to pay for my taxes on the building, the overhead crane to lift the damm plate out of your old truck, pay to clamp it to my 125,000 machine. pay for the drug induced clean up boy to pack the chips out and the fee to haul off the garbage. You also have to pay for the wages of the machinist and the pay roll taxes. And then if I make any money the irs wants there cut too...then the book keepers wages, the cost of a 1k facing head and the inserts, the electricity bill, and the coolant cost and the wasted hour of hearing your life story why I am ripping you off charging so much for a simple job. I have a great idea go buy your own machine and do it yourself CHEAP, you should just pay the 500 bucks and concern your self with the fact that you have a go to guy that helps you ... my 2 cents worth ...Phil
    Don't forget the 10% surcharge if the customer gets to watch.

    EDIT: Per Google, most steels weigh in at around 489 # per cubic foot. At 61" X 24" X 4.25" we are looking at 6,222 cu. in, or 3.6 cu. ft or 1,760 #. (please check my math, LOL) So, add in the cost of a new gear train for your overhead crane and a new Turcite job for your giant mill bed. Sounds to me like that $500 price is sounding better all of the time.


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    "Steel" weighs in at .283# / cubic inch.

    This should be real easy for any 50 yr old + gearhead to remember.


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    "Steel" weighs in at .283# / cubic inch.

    This should be real easy for any 50 yr old + gearhead to remember.


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    Ox
    Yep, like I said, 489# per cubic foot.

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    I used to do a lot of A36 plates for a company that made printing presses. I found out after the first plate what a pita facing off A36 was, so always used a Blanchard grinder to knock down the plate to size, they could get it flatter than I could, plus they could get the material cheaper than I could as well.

    I could see skimming one side, releasing the clamps, and having the plate spring enough that you couldn't get the thickness required, or having to flip more than once to keep it flat.

    I would no bid a job like this, no matter how well I knew the customer, not even if it was cash up front, not even if I could go camping with his cute sister for the weekend. The OP has the aura of a customer who is going to be a potential pita. No thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    I used to do a lot of A36 plates for a company that made printing presses. I found out after the first plate what a pita facing off A36 was, so always used a Blanchard grinder to knock down the plate to size, they could get it flatter than I could, plus they could get the material cheaper than I could as well.

    I could see skimming one side, releasing the clamps, and having the plate spring enough that you couldn't get the thickness required, or having to flip more than once to keep it flat.

    I would no bid a job like this, no matter how well I knew the customer, not even if it was cash up front, not even if I could go camping with his cute sister for the weekend. The OP has the aura of a customer who is going to be a potential pita. No thanks.




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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post



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    Evidently you want a picture of the customers sister, happy to oblige.

    screen_shot_2021_04_14_at_4.23.25_pm.jpg

    Apparently she likes to be 'in charge' whatever that means.

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    ... the "cute" one.
    I think you clicked on the wrong line?


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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    I used to do a lot of A36 plates for a company that made printing presses. I found out after the first plate what a pita facing off A36 was, so always used a Blanchard grinder to knock down the plate to size, they could get it flatter than I could, plus they could get the material cheaper than I could as well.

    I could see skimming one side, releasing the clamps, and having the plate spring enough that you couldn't get the thickness required, or having to flip more than once to keep it flat.

    I would no bid a job like this, no matter how well I knew the customer, not even if it was cash up front, not even if I could go camping with his cute sister for the weekend. The OP has the aura of a customer who is going to be a potential pita. No thanks.
    Really? At 4" thick it's not going to move that much. What are you comparing difficult to? MIC6?

    I'd do this no problem for an actual customer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    Don't forget the 10% surcharge if the customer gets to watch.

    EDIT: Per Google, most steels weigh in at around 489 # per cubic foot. At 61" X 24" X 4.25" we are looking at 6,222 cu. in, or 3.6 cu. ft or 1,760 #. (please check my math, LOL) So, add in the cost of a new gear train for your overhead crane and a new Turcite job for your giant mill bed. Sounds to me like that $500 price is sounding better all of the time.

    Any "real" 30x60 machine will have at least double that table capacity. The magnetic chucks are a bit heavy though, and only cost around 20k for that size part, which is kinda necessary if you actually want to get anywhere close to the 30 minute MRR figure here without tossing the part off the table.

    But you probably have to skim the back side to give the magnet something smooth to hold on to.

    If you dont have a magnet(s), you better figure on some side work for hold downs.

    Or you can spend 3+hrs picking at it with a 2" feed mill and regular toe clamps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott24898 View Post
    As an average, what is the best calculation of face milling? I have a 4"1/4 A36 plate that needs to be milled to 4". The plate is 24" x 5'1". I'm being told the cost is $500.00. Sounds very high. I would think with the proper cutter it would only take about 20 to 30 minutes to mill 1/4" off. Thought??
    I sometimes have jobs to do that are bigger than my shop’s capacity. I’m lucky enough to have a few friends locally who work in large-ish capacity mostly manual shops. My approach is simple- tell me when you have some spare time, show up when they tell me, bring fresh donuts and coffee for the entire crew, and bring cash. Have always been treated more than fairly.

    YMMV.

    L7

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    I have done machining on 4" plates, a few times in the past, your quote of $500 is a cheap, and that You should jump on it.....

    Before someone realizes they forgot a 1 in front of it...


    []

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillside Fab View Post
    Any "real" 30x60 machine will have at least double that table capacity. The magnetic chucks are a bit heavy though, and only cost around 20k for that size part, which is kinda necessary if you actually want to get anywhere close to the 30 minute MRR figure here without tossing the part off the table.

    But you probably have to skim the back side to give the magnet something smooth to hold on to.

    If you dont have a magnet(s), you better figure on some side work for hold downs.

    Or you can spend 3+hrs picking at it with a 2" feed mill and regular toe clamps.
    Yes, and skimming the backside would entail flipping a 1.34 ton slab over after skimming said backside. I'd like to watch that.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Radar987 View Post
    High compared to what? A cheap hooker?
    Your budget must have been double mine! jkjk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobw View Post
    So it should cost less than $5.. Not $500. <--- Sarcasm.

    A minute to put it on the machine, 1.2 minutes to machine, a minute to take it off.
    3.2 minutes at $90 an hour. That's a $5 job all day everyday.. Any shop should be
    happy to have that job.. Preferably paid in pennies and nickels, not even in rolls,
    but in a used sandwich bag that has crumbs in it, and a mayonnaise smear.
    I guess you have dealt with Verline Mfg. as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doug925 View Post
    I guess you have dealt with Verline Mfg. as well.

    Production Gary @ Koncor Ind.



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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post

    screen_shot_2021_04_14_at_4.23.25_pm.jpg

    Apparently she likes to be 'in charge' whatever that means.
    [King Auther- Python's Holy Grail voice] Run away! run Away!!!

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    Is this job done yet?

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    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    Is this job done yet?
    Naw....they will need to gather up a bunch of people for a "Cost analysis" group, hold daily meetings, etc.

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