Do U Allow Chairs in your CNC shop? - Page 8
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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    To be honest I never liked to sit down at a machine just in case anything goes wrong. I like to be able to get out of the way rapido !

    Regards Tyrone.
    You've got me wondering how often something "went wrong" for you.

    I've always found that when something "goes wrong" the most important thing is how fast I react. I can still catch a dropped pencil (with my hand above and someone dropping) before it hits the floor. Surprises the hell out of most when I do it

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  3. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Age
    Sex
    Religion
    Race

    Overall health?


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    Ox
    Americans with Disabilities Act.
    A

  4. #143
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    Go ahead, there's the tower crane, show me your stuff!


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  5. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    FWIW - If I was running it - I would likely be donned about the same as him.

    Pull-on boots tho.



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    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    I ran a big OKK horizontal when I was an apprentice, we would face the tooling plates down, prior to machining. It was all tool steel, taken at the max feed and speed and full depth and width of cut on an 8” facemill.

    I got screamed at several times about wearing long sleeved shirts. One day it was hot, and I had just been screamed at, so I didn’t wear a long sleeved shirt. I went to my class that afternoon with burns and welts all over my arms and around my neck. The woman that ran the apprenticeship program was there and asked me what the hell happened. I explained.

    The next morning I fired the machine up, and was getting ready to start a cut, with no long sleeves, and the same guy screamed at me: “What in the hell are you doing running that machine without long sleeves on! Put a god damn shirt on!”

    Of course the simple lesson here, is don’t run your tooling at the absolute limit. We were required to stand at the machine, getting a bath in hot chips, because if an insert broke, it would wipe several pockets out before you could shut the machine down. If you were a few steps away, you’d be lucky to have any inserts by the time you got to it.

    My Moore, in the machine diagram has the placement for a stool or chair.

    My last “real” job, boss started to give me hell one day, I was sitting at the break table drinking a coke, eating left over pizza and reading a magazine. I didn’t even look up I just pointed at the wall. Behind the wall you could hear my machine growling away with the occasional but rare tool change.

    Mid sentence of his lecture I stood up and walked out. He followed me in a huff. He caught up to me at the machine as I was changing the part. He smiled and said, “you knew the part was about done by the tool that was running, huh?” I smiled. The guy across the aisle was welding a fixture with no screens, even though I had moved them over three times. Another guy was grinding the scale off of plate and I was tired of hacking up black snot. I told the boss, in the future, if you ever see me sitting in a chair, you can congratulate me, because that means my machine is running, the next few jobs are programmed, tooling is set up, material is cut, and I am waiting on engineering.

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  7. #145
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    All the guys talking about how unsafe long sleeve shirts are, what do you think about the guys who used to wear ties in the shop when most machinery was run by line shaft? The clip on wasn't invented till 1928, wonder how many guys got strangled?

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  9. #146
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    Thinking the pant cuffs are a bigger worry than the sleeves. He should probably wear those skinny jeans when riding the cut.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Thinking the pant cuffs are a bigger worry than the sleeves. He should probably wear those skinny jeans when riding the cut.


    Think about how he has to move to control the machine. His leg cuffs are going to be away from any moving machine so the chance of him getting dragged in due to that is much less. Now with his arms there is a much better chance that he can be injured. I often wonder the injuries manual vs CNC machines. My view is that manual is much more dangerous as far as injury is concerned.

    He just changed a insert and picked back up on the cut. See the ways and how the grease on it stops on a straight line. So he might have missed it for that time or been called somewhere else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    All the guys talking about how unsafe long sleeve shirts are, what do you think about the guys who used to wear ties in the shop when most machinery was run by line shaft? The clip on wasn't invented till 1928, wonder how many guys got strangled?
    By the machine.... or the boss for not wearing one...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trueturning View Post
    Think about how he has to move to control the machine. His leg cuffs are going to be away from any moving machine so the chance of him getting dragged in due to that is much less. Now with his arms there is a much better chance that he can be injured. I often wonder the injuries manual vs CNC machines. My view is that manual is much more dangerous as far as injury is concerned.

    He just changed a insert and picked back up on the cut. See the ways and how the grease on it stops on a straight line. So he might have missed it for that time or been called somewhere else.
    looks to me that grease line coincides with the taper he's cutting

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    Your manager should be fired.

    I walk ALL THE TIME at work. Since I'm a pretty hectic/neurotic sort, I walk around even when I don't need to. If I couldn't sit down and rest my legs at 2pm when the feet simply can't take it anymore I'd flat out quit.

    Seriously, that moron needs to wisen up, get fired or you all should just go sayonara on him.

    By the way. Did the cunt get rid of his OWN chair?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rewt View Post
    looks to me that grease line coincides with the taper he's cutting
    Right. I did not notice it until you mentioned it.

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    Anyway apart from the gut response here. Some discussion about old farts who can't stand up and are obsolete.

    My colleague Yuri retired today. He was 67. He was sitting a lot. Yes. He took breaks. However:

    The shop will be worse without him. He wasn't the nicest most personable guy, and some thought he was just sitting waiting for his long cycle times, but consider:

    He knew everything about all the old tools in the shop. He could always give advice on a sensible (if not super fast) way to run a certain part. Whenever someone was falling behind, not managing deburring the parts on time, not managing to dual-op two jobs, he'd be there and help out. And: even the people who did not like him will miss him, as in BEING ON THE JOB AVAILABLE FOR THE KNOWLEDGE, now that he's gone.

    I have a stool. It's quite high. I don't sit on it much since I'm hyperactive, and I don't like low chairs. I sit on the stool to change inserts since I'm clumsy. I may sit on it to deburr some bits. I certainly sit on it sketching toolpaths and doing calculations (yes, I'm not old but I actually prefer working with pen and paper most times to visualize.) I practically never sit down unless it's work-related.

    Bottom line being, "sitting" doesn't mean "not working." Working as a coder I sat all day. I'll sit and work on the next job calculations and work out a strategy while I supervise the machine.

    My most common job has a cycle time of 90 seconds (down from 140 since I got it,) very simple, and will require me to lift around fifteen metric tons of steel per day. I can't sit down much then and certainly not in a low chair. Take away my stool for when my feet ache and I need to find a way to sit and operate my machine, I would quit instantly.

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  19. #153
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    Those must be at least 70, if not 100# parts?

    Last year I was running a job like that, but much longer cycles.
    It felt good to get a good werk out.
    I ran it myself so that I don't git some employee claiming back issues or whatnot....

    But after 6-8 months, I found that my left elbow started bothering me at the end.
    I found that I was holding the whole weight (100#) mostly from one arm, and at some points - the arm was fully extended / lowered, like if you was carrying a sheet of OSB or ????

    So then my elbow started fussin' about it.
    I think the fix for that is to not let the arm fully extend and pull down on the ligaments (tendons?) in that same fashion.
    The assembly must have been re-designed and they doo not require the work that I was dooing anymore.
    But I thought it quite ridiculous that we were dooing it to begin with - knowing where it was going.
    So not surprised.


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    A good machinist will always watch closely the machine whether they stand or sit. The good ones know what the processes are with what they are running and usually show superior reflex and attention to problems with the machine.

    Whether chairs are always a problem takes me back to when I have worked where chairs and sitting were allowed. Getting off ones feet is nice. It must not be conducive to inattention or even falling asleep. A night shift in general has the possibility of workers being tired yet there must be a night shift. So it is better to address individuals rather than in a blanket kind of way targeting the whole shop because of a few employees issues. Firstvyou talk to the person who has a problem then deal with that.

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    The world of machining is never dull. Every shop has its own version of issues and complaints. IMO it depends on the type of work and how good is the leadership. We do not have chairs for the operators but do provide them for other tasks that are just better to sit. If you give someone the chance to slack they sure will. I don’t see an issue having chairs as long as production is good and have low scrap rates. If your employees are slacking off and are not producing quality parts it ain’t the chairs fault.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    All the guys talking about how unsafe long sleeve shirts are, what do you think about the guys who used to wear ties in the shop when most machinery was run by line shaft? The clip on wasn't invented till 1928, wonder how many guys got strangled?
    When I was in college in England, I was taught that real engineers wore bowties because they were safer around machinery.

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  24. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielG View Post
    When I was in college in England, I was taught that real engineers wore bowties because they were safer around machinery.
    Pssst... They call it "University" over there...

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  26. #158
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    We call it university here as well, but why when you are going, it is “college” at a university?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fal Grunt View Post
    We call it university here as well, but why when you are going, it is “college” at a university?
    Let me take a crack at this.

    A "School" is where you study: e.g. School of Mechanical Engineering
    A "College" is a collection of "Schools" e.g. College of Engineering
    A "University" is a collection of "Colleges" e.g. University of Michigan

    So in the US, most higher learning establishments are Universities, but some of the smaller ones are indeed Colleges and have a more limited scope. But you are in fact going to a college, even when you go to a university. We just use the terms interchangeably instead of making any kind of distinction.
    Last edited by BoxcarPete; 09-30-2019 at 04:23 PM. Reason: clarity

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gobo View Post
    Back to chairs. One operator tripped over his chair and fucked up his back good. There was talk of removing all chairs, but the natives grew restless and M'Bwana backed off.
    Was this before or after Oregon legalized weed?

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