Do you explain to customers why you no quote? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I usually do; assuming, the part is too big, not a good fit for my machines, or I KNOW they can get it MUCH cheaper at another shop with the correct size machines.

    Doug.

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  3. #22
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    I have always and will always advise and ask why a NO quote was given. the feedback is very helpful. I have found times when the shop I am sending RFQ's is actually unable to preform the work. I then know not to send that type of work for them to quote. It saves them and me, and I get a better understanding of my vendors.


    On the flip side when we no quote I will specifically advise, as there have been many times when the customer actually wasn't sure of the project specs, and we have been able to change the spec or scope of things to allow us to do the work. Communication is rarely a bad thing.

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  5. #23
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    I feel explaining is always profitable.

    If You pass the work on to someone You know, You get lots of goodwill.
    They will do something good for You, when they can.

    If You save the customer time or money or better results, they will reward You, when they can.
    Because most other providers did not explain, so they prefer to try to work with You, as You then are proven more honest and fair.

    Customers do not buy cheaper, in fact.
    Even with identical specs.

    Customers will usually and often buy upto 2x the price of competitors bids, if You can make it attractive to them some way.
    And sometimes quite easily commit to large volumes, if You make it attractive to them.

    I made my first million profit that way, 26 years ago.
    High margin (customer knew).

    E.g.
    A customer can often commit to a binding PO with no settled details, with relatively high unit prices, where one pre-machines blanks and stocks them, with final details to be done as-needed.
    The customer is assured availability, and minor last-minute changes, and can get better accuracy or cosmetics because the blanks or base parts are done in high volume off-peak time.

    Neither party would have great standing in a court - but neither will ever get to one.
    Customer pre-pays, often most, and gets fast custom finish machining on their widgets in record time.
    Customer pays say 300$/widget in qty 100, per lot, and the lot is shipped within 3-4 days.

    And every lot can be slightly different, but will have the same material shine, finish, cosmetic appearance as it comes from the same material and base process blank machining.
    And the customer bought say 12x300x2 /month = 7200 widgets x 300 each = 2.160.000 $.
    And paid say 1.1 M$ up front.

    And the customer paid the 300$, when competitors could make *one* random set for 150-190$ each.

    With maybe 15-20 days delivery, once, and no guarantee on the cosmetics on the next set, and no guarantee on availability in time for the next set.

    Customers are not dumb.
    They have all been burned by endless hassles and problems and issues.

  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug925 View Post
    I usually do; assuming, the part is too big, not a good fit for my machines, or I KNOW they can get it MUCH cheaper at another shop with the correct size machines.

    Doug.
    When this happens do you tell the buyer the one or list of other shops that are better suited for this part?
    Or since overlap on other quotes in your boathouse not add a future competitor?
    Bob

  7. #25
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    This is how some of my quoting has been going lately.

    e-mail. RFQ: ABC123

    Reply: Can you send the print please.

    2 days later.

    e-mail. RFQ: ABC123[2nd request]

    Reply: Can you send the print please?

    2 days later.

    e-mail. RFQ: ABC123[3rd request]

    Reply: Can you send the print please?

    2 days later

    E-mail. RFQ: ABC123[4th request]

    Reply: Can you send the print please?

    2 days later

    E-mail. RFQ: ABC123[5th request] WITH AN ATTACHMENT THIS TIME!!
    Finally.. I get a print..

    Open the attachment, and its a packaging spec that has nothing to do with the part.

    Reply: Can you send the print please?

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  9. #26
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    Bobw,

    Or you spend an hour updating password and username because the drawings are on their website and their IT department can't find you in the system (even though you have been a vendor for years), only to find out the drawings are not the correct revision as the RFQ . Then you start the email chain. Then find out the drawings are for a 6 foot auger and you don't do that kind of work.

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  11. #27
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    As a customer I really like having a reason for the no quote. That way I can have a better understanding of what my vendor's capabilities are and I hopefully won't waste their time or mine in the future.

    As a manufacturer we try to give reasons. It's typically due to not have tooling in house for a one off order. At that point our sales force can inquire to the amount of business this project could bring if we tool up to do it.

  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    When this happens do you tell the buyer the one or list of other shops that are better suited for this part?
    Or since overlap on other quotes in your boathouse not add a future competitor?
    Bob
    Bob,

    That depends on the customer, and the shop I may suggest.
    If a good (longtime, and good standing) customer needs something that a buddy's shop can handle better/quicker/cheaper, then yes, I will let my customer know.

    That way the send me the parts that best fit my work scope, and my friend's shop gets the stuff I don't want.
    It can be a win/win/win situation. (unless it goes bad...)


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