Finding high volume work - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 41
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    2,527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1875
    Likes (Received)
    1565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thunderskunk View Post
    Firearms accessories came to mind, but the further I can stay from that the better.
    I won't do firearm stuff either, on the other hand it could keep you busy. I was at the anodizers a few weeks ago and they had pallets of what looked like AR recievers. They guy dropping them off said they can't keep up with demand. He didn't see demand slowing. There were 400 on the pallets.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    155
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    I do tooling for the inspection dept of a company that makes satellite parts.

    The buyer e-mailed with an RFQ for some satelite part and a questionaire.
    Questions like
    Does the company have a quality manual, NOPE
    Does the company have measurement instruments calibrated to a traceable standard, NOPE
    Does the company have wheel chair access NOPE (my shop is a death trap for the less than able bodied)
    When can Quality control do a site inspection NOT IN MY LIFETIME

    So as can be imagined I'm still only doing tooling for inspection.

    -----------------------------------------------------

    If your running out of a garage, and a customer wants to do a site inspection, then that's going to be a no-go for the customer.

    -----------------------------------------------------

    What happens if you get a large production job,with a tight deadline, your hired help(s) flake out and you end up running the job? If that were to happen it's possible it might effect your present employment ,coming in tired after running all night/coming in late/taking too many days off. If you like working at the present job, I'd be very carefull about jepordizing that job.
    Iíve seen that sort of supplier interview form; Iíd say my employerís questions are even more thorough than that. They ask for financials if theyíre not public, culture and safety questions... itís like 140 lines long.

    Having gone through AS9100 audits, and playing with the stuff on oxebridge, I could dredge up a QMS better than places I know are As9100 certified. If I get master parts for the equator calibrated at NIST Metrology labs, Iíve now got readability covered without a single calibrated tool in the shop.

    Iím not saying itís easy or worth it. The point is more that Iíve seen sneakier ways of checking boxes with far more effort required.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    155
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    I won't do firearm stuff either, on the other hand it could keep you busy. I was at the anodizers a few weeks ago and they had pallets of what looked like AR recievers. They guy dropping them off said they can't keep up with demand. He didn't see demand slowing. There were 400 on the pallets.
    I believe it. But man what a risk. Hopefully you make enough money off the sales to afford the lawyer; that Bill about not protecting manufacturers in case someone uses a firearm in a crime is just... bonkers! I make a washer. The washer gets used on the screw holding the hand grip of a gun used in a shooting. Now Iím in jail because someone used my washer in a crime. Iím sure thereís not going to be any grandfathering in, so liability would extend to anything made before the bill went into place.

    Never mind not being allowed to make a product because of a ban.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dewees Texas
    Posts
    3,192
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    34
    Likes (Received)
    1059

    Default

    I used to make a good living finding over priced OEM parts improving them some and selling them for less. The part that really paid off was $49.00 each from a Japanese OEM. we sold them for $15.00 each to end users and $5.70 to distributors. I paid taxes on $250K a year for a couple years doing that. Now anyone can buy the same parts for $.70 post paid from China. That is less than the material cost. Not so many plums like that hanging low in the tree anymore.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    859
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    431
    Likes (Received)
    439

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    If your running out of a garage, and a customer wants to do a site inspection, then that's going to be a no-go for the customer.
    We had a customer that wanted to do this kind of crap. Their supplier form required us to authorize them 24/7 access for surprise inspections. And we had to notify them immediately if we moved any equipment on our production floor. Never in a million years would have I agreed to it. But if I had, you bet I would write a script that would e-mail them new coordinates of machines every 15 minutes or so. Just to account for continental drift and the like.

  6. Likes Bobw, wheelieking71, triumph406 liked this post
  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    10,435
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    603
    Likes (Received)
    8470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    If your running out of a garage, and a customer wants to do a site inspection, then that's going to be a no-go for the customer.
    Will it? One may be surprised.
    Present the shop proud and this is what we do.
    Bob

  8. Likes wheelieking71 liked this post
  9. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    2,527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1875
    Likes (Received)
    1565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Will it? One may be surprised.
    Present the shop proud and this is what we do.
    Bob
    I started out with 2 BP's and an HLV in a garage underneath an appartement in Huntington Beach, somehow I didn't ever see that passing muster, regardless how well it presented.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    2,527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1875
    Likes (Received)
    1565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thunderskunk View Post
    I’ve seen that sort of supplier interview form; I’d say my employer’s questions are even more thorough than that. They ask for financials if they’re not public, culture and safety questions... it’s like 140 lines long.
    This was one of the 2 forms I had to fill out. Can't remember how many I answered YES to, but It wasn't many.

    The dipshit buyer kept hounding me to fill out the forms, promptly which I did, then forgot to pay me for 90+ days.

    x1.jpgx2.jpgx3.jpgx4.jpgx5.jpg

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    2,527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1875
    Likes (Received)
    1565

    Default

    x6.jpgx7.jpg

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    441
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    234
    Likes (Received)
    199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    x6.jpgx7.jpg
    Looks pretty standard to me. I see these all the time. Its just to have on file in case they ever have a problem and need to go back and find out why.

    Its just a formality most of the time.

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    240

    Default

    Nothing says those entries all have to be different people.

  14. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    ALAND ISLANDS
    Posts
    334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    155
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    Nothing says those entries all have to be different people.
    Are we talking about supplier onboarding questionnaires or AS9100-D? (I hope my auditor doesn't see this...)

  15. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    3,406
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1389
    Likes (Received)
    1511

    Default

    It's out there but your not going to find it working as an employee. Whenever talking with a prospective or new customer I would always ask for their problem parts. Often their "problem" parts really were not that hard so it was a great way to get in the door. Get known to be a problem solver and flexible, both things a bigger shop will not be as good at, and you will have an avenue to more work. If it doesn't work out this way keep looking. You will get the hang of it since you will be doing it with a lot of customers to find the good one. The problem with your situation is you are too busy with your day job to do any of this.

    Another thought, if your happy being an employee you are probably not going to have the manic drive needed to have your own shop. I think most of us who have our own shops were never happy being an employee. Being in business for myself isn't something I wanted, it's something I HAD to do, there was no choice about it. Even when I was an employee I always had side hustles going on to keep me satisfied that I wasn't just an employee.

  16. Likes Bobw, Hillside Fab, wheelieking71 liked this post
  17. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    5,226
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    933

    Default

    I can't say you won't find this kind of high volume work.

    But, one thing that strikes me is high volume implies reliable on-time delivery. One man and one machine does not guarantee reliable deliveries. Man gets Covid (or flu or whatever) or machine breaks down... deliveries stop.

    One of my locals with high volume work requires a minimum of seven employees and not required, but helpful if the shop has backup machines.

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    I can't say you won't find this kind of high volume work.

    But, one thing that strikes me is high volume implies reliable on-time delivery. One man and one machine does not guarantee reliable deliveries. Man gets Covid (or flu or whatever) or machine breaks down... deliveries stop.

    One of my locals with high volume work requires a minimum of seven employees and not required, but helpful if the shop has backup machines.
    Absolutely. Before anyone jumps in and says itís the customerís responsibility to warehouse materials that covers for that, consider the cost. The cost of 1 day of inventory at the higher volume places Iíve worked has been between $100k and $5M. Warehouse space aside, carrying an extra couple weeks of inventory is no small expense, even at that level. Even more so if all that inventory buys them is the ability to source from a smaller shop.
    Remember, if they catch something wrong with the parts youíre making at the assembly step, the ones in the warehouse are suspect too. Youíre probably on the hook to sort or replace all the bad product, and youíd rather that amount be as small as possible. If you think the income per risk and effort is good at a hot dog stand, you havenít ever had to hire a sorting company.

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    North Carolina
    Posts
    293
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    91
    Likes (Received)
    140

    Default

    By "good idea", do you mean failed products? Because a product would be my first approach; it completely sidesteps all the paperwork issues above, and allows you to dial in a process instead of running endless prototypes.

    I'd think a 5 axis Robodrill could make a very high end item, just a matter of finding the right one.

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    2,527
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1875
    Likes (Received)
    1565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    Nothing says those entries all have to be different people.
    Some companies aren't going to like a one man company, where Procurement,programming,machining,quality, assembly etc etc are one person.

    The big sticking point is probably being quality control, where there should be a seperation between production and quality to avoid conflicts of interest, a one person shop is going to be conflicted. Large Aerospace companies might find trying to qualify a one man shop problematic.

    All the companies I do work for know I'm a one man band, but they care more about cost and delivery than being ISO, or having a quality manual, procedures etc etc.

  21. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    164
    Likes (Received)
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    One man and one machine does not guarantee reliable deliveries. Man gets Covid (or flu or whatever) or machine breaks down... deliveries stop.
    That's where that manic drive mentioned in the post above yours kicks in. But I get the P.A. not seeing it that way.

  22. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    561
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    Some companies aren't going to like a one man company, where Procurement,programming,machining,quality, assembly etc etc are one person.

    The big sticking point is probably being quality control, where there should be a seperation between production and quality to avoid conflicts of interest, a one person shop is going to be conflicted. Large Aerospace companies might find trying to qualify a one man shop problematic.

    All the companies I do work for know I'm a one man band, but they care more about cost and delivery than being ISO, or having a quality manual, procedures etc etc.
    The times I see that happening (somewhat off topic from this thread) are when the development engineers at Big Company Inc. are trying to get a few prototypes and the company purchasing rules require that form to onboard any supplier. A smart company at that point follows up with "Do you take CC?", but not all purchasing groups are so understanding.

    Several years ago I did some consulting work for a large automotive Tier 1. I put down my phone number and name for all of the contact information, checked "no" to any and all certifications, and went on with my day. The only annoyance was that they wanted a real fax number, and wouldn't let me enter an e-mail address in that field. I solved that with by paying a fax service $20 for the year. Of course they never actually faxed me anything, but I saw it as the cost of doing business.

  23. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    164
    Likes (Received)
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    The big sticking point is probably being quality control, where there should be a seperation between production and quality to avoid conflicts of interest, a one person shop is going to be conflicted. Large Aerospace companies might find trying to qualify a one man shop problematic.
    Idk - if you are talking about a 10-20 man company and the owner has no ethics, the parts will get still get shipped, even with a dozen different names signing off. Departments fighting eachother only seems to start happening in a 50-100 man shop, and if it is privately owned all those issues can still be glossed over.

    Not saying that's right, and it's not how I do things, but I've seen it from the engineer's chair receiving parts from the cheapest bidders on one offs and very low volume stuff.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •