Going Lights Out: from a management standpoint - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Technology is getting to the point where "running lights out" procedures should be the norm and "lights on" style working can be reserved for special cases.

    Potentially makes life so much easier when jobs are normally set so they can just be run lights out if that makes for a sensible schedule . Doing such is also an effective process improvement driver as it will focus attention on why the more special jobs cannot currently be run lights out and what changes could be made so that they can.

    In many ways running lights out is the direct spiritual successor to old style manufacturing with ranks of dumb machines with unskilled operators pulling the handles supported by skilled tool-setters. Probably some inspiration to be gained there. The big mass production firms pretty much jumped straight over refining their processes as they went. But for the smaller shop the process / management changes in going CNC have been more like turbocharging (with nitrous injection and afterburners too) prototype and toolroom shop procedures.

    Clive

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fal Grunt View Post

    Culture, to me, is huge in lights out. The above shop had lots of problems with culture. I’m not bragging, just using my self as a bench mark. I liked to get my machines up and running, then line up the next few jobs and tooling. Then I liked to start setting or running something else. Many guys would setup their machine and then sit. Even on a lights out job. Some people are like that.
    What is in it for them to do what you do?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fancuku View Post
    What is in it for them to do what you do?
    Pride, that unpaid call to duty.
    The care about your give to the world to do your best without reward.
    No actual cash money in it for them and perhaps less in their paycheck with time saved so you sort of slit your own throat in a sort of short sighted point of view.
    Then again there is tomorrow and those that went the extra.
    When the cuts come, and they always do, who stays and who goes.
    Bob

  4. Likes Ox, barbter, Jashley73 liked this post
  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    OP, are you the said manager? If so, good on you to ask, if not, go talk to them before even 'wasting'* your time trying to do this!!
    Sort of. I have my hand in scheduling, but I’m an engineer. There will be some flak from the management I think.

    I really liked the comment about training; neither myself nor anyone in the shop has experience with running truly lights out. I have a bit with a second and third shift, but as mentioned that’s entirely different. We have a great crew and a pretty receptive staff for new ideas. I think they just need the benefits “proven” in small chunks.


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