How do you organize your tooling? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by JP Machining View Post
    Plastic Box Assortments
    Lista style drawer cabinets, 1 drawer for steel endmills, one drawer for aluminum endmills, one for specials.

    I use Hout drill cabinets for drills and taps
    I bought a couple big assorted 11 draw Lista cabinets with a bunch of their dividers then picked up a couple hundred of those Red containers in all sizes.

    I try to keep similar's together labeled with a P-Touch label maker.
    Assign draws to cutting tools, Endmills, Taps, Boring Bars, Indexables, Collets 16C ER11's 16's and 32's. Stops for collets. Welding consumables in another draw. Parallels and V-Blocks together....another draw for Milling Hold down stud sets, toe clamps. Another draw for vise Jaw fixtures and samples.

    Its a work in progress, but organizing has really saved lots of time looking for stuff. I have a ways to go...but much better.

    Also a few Hout drill and tap cabinets really help.
    Harbor Freight rack for reamers...assort in bins by similar size- (.1-.15) (.151-.2) etc etc...cheap and quick.

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  3. #42
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    These plastic drawer cabinets have been working very well for me.
    I use a label printer similar that mentioned above, and put color labels depending the tool type:

    - Green: cutting tools with designated tool holder.
    - Blue: cutting tools with shared tool holder.
    - Red: cutting tools with odd sizes, that you feel bad throwing away (LOL).

    0213180900_resized.jpg

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by riabma77 View Post
    These plastic drawer cabinets have been working very well for me.
    I use a label printer similar that mentioned above, and put color labels depending the tool type:

    - Green: cutting tools with designated tool holder.
    - Blue: cutting tools with shared tool holder.
    - Red: cutting tools with odd sizes, that you feel bad throwing away (LOL).

    0213180900_resized.jpg
    I use the same cabinets. SAE screws are blue, metric are green. For end mill HSS is green and carbide is red.

  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by alskdjfhg View Post
    I just bought 500 endmill off eBay, so going to rearrange stuff
    My dad tool a long piece of wood, drilled a bunch of blind holes in it and then sliced it in half the long way. Gave him scalloped trays to sent endmills in without them banging around.

    You can see it in the attached picture.
    drawers3-1-.jpg

    Steve

  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mthomure View Post
    I use the magnet covers that go on top of heater floor vents. Lowes or Home Depot have them where you find the vent covers.
    You can get magnetic material cheap from any sign shop (unless, of course, the owner is a jerk and won't sell it to you because he wants to make a sign for you).

    We used to buy it of a 24" wide roll for $20/ft, but that was a while ago.

    Steve

  8. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave D View Post
    Good on you for acquiring a drafting cabinet. I have been looking on and off for years trying to find one within my budget.
    I know Dave is too far away, but I have two of those 5-drawer units I'm selling for my dad for $300 for both. Includes a stand to keep the bottom drawer off the floor.
    20160509_192026.jpg

    I would take them, but I don't have the room for the depth.

    Each drawer in that unit has the surface area of all the storage in a Kennedy 520 machinist chest, and then you can still stack stuff on top. I though of having the Huot drill / tap dispensers on top on a lazy susan.

    Not sure of the dimensions, but something close to four feet wide and maybe 30" or so deep.

    You can lay all your machinist tools out in one layer and not have to dig.

    It's in southwestern Connecticut.

    Steve

  9. #47
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    I have a simple FDM 3d Printer for rapid prototyping of small parts (fit and form test, some minor function testing). I made modeled up a few sizes of plastic trays that fit a small metal drawer system (the type with slots roughly 3 1/2 wide and dividers you can install). Just a 1/4 thick rectangle with 1/2, 3/8 or 1/4 diameter arcs cut away patterned to leave a small gap between the cutters. A small solid endcap on one side saves space and allows them to go end to end.

    Made them to fit my standard tool lengths with a little extra, long versions etc. By printing different colors I have them separated by roughing, aluminum specific, standard. I can fit 4 on the printer table and hit go when I leave, Hour and a half each.

  10. #48
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    I ran a tool crib for a large shop that did a huge mix of parts. Production, and one of parts. That being said we had a huge number of tools and related fixtures. The best advice I can give you is to pick a system that can grow with your needs and stick with it. Time is money we all know that, so being able to lay your hand on something when you need it is important. Storage and organization can be expensive... Just like buying a special tool, and then not being able to find it is. I have a small shop now, and the struggle is real. Make a plan and leave room to grow. Everything needs a place, it is well worth the money to stay organized.

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  12. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by paoldschool View Post
    I ran a tool crib for a large shop that did a huge mix of parts. Production, and one of parts. That being said we had a huge number of tools and related fixtures. The best advice I can give you is to pick a system that can grow with your needs and stick with it. Time is money we all know that, so being able to lay your hand on something when you need it is important. Storage and organization can be expensive... Just like buying a special tool, and then not being able to find it is. I have a small shop now, and the struggle is real. Make a plan and leave room to grow. Everything needs a place, it is well worth the money to stay organized.
    Once worked for a firm that 43+ years in had that done and rather well, plus another part we have not yet mentioned - AFAIK.

    Yah also needs a lower grade storage capability. Two, even, both of them organized and prioritized.

    Seldom used but still of-value "stuff" gets downgraded - is no longer held close to the workspace. Some things need to be retained, but moved-out, rather than kept close by, because room to WORK is easily as valuable as room to store.

    Wes - ewsley - had a thread on the importance of periodic clean-up. Too easily we forget that "warehousing" goods neither you nor anyone else has a use for doesn't pay well vs operating a business or funding a hobby.

    Staging stuff from active use to "maybe later in the year" is a built-in first step. Make the time now and then to clean house first on those stale goods. The rest will follow in due course.

    Their very location - unretrieved to the workspace - confirms they are NOT what you need in current times. Be merciless. Brutal, even. Kick them out of your space and your life.

  13. #50
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    I just bought a few more tool boxes and a few storage bins and drawer trays for the new shop as I didn't want anything laying around. Took a bit of time to sort and arrange it all but it's working great so far and made it really easy to clean the rest of the shop/chips up. Big thing is to put stuff back where it belongs when done.

  14. #51
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    My dad has two cabinets, one to the left and one to the right of the bench where he used to have his South Bend lathe.

    The one to the right was the dental cabinet out of his office when he bought the practice in 1961 (it was already there, so it's pretty old). It has a mix of drawer sizes, which worked well for dentistry as well as lathe work.
    shop-3-.jpg

    On the other side was a cabinet that I think was for typesetting. Not one of those old wood ones, the drawers are metal but only about 1 to 1-1/2" deep. Great for laying out all manner of measuring tools in one layer. The foam insert stuff would work really well in these.
    shop-1-.jpg

    Shameless plug: the Pultra lathe on it is for sale.

    There was storage under the bench for larger things and above as well. The milling machine was directly behind you as you stood at the lathe, and the drill press was to the right of the dental cabinet.

    He pretty much never had to walk more than two steps.

    Steve

  15. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by paoldschool View Post
    I ran a tool crib for a large shop that did a huge mix of parts. Production, and one of parts. That being said we had a huge number of tools and related fixtures. The best advice I can give you is to pick a system that can grow with your needs and stick with it. Time is money we all know that, so being able to lay your hand on something when you need it is important. Storage and organization can be expensive... Just like buying a special tool, and then not being able to find it is. I have a small shop now, and the struggle is real. Make a plan and leave room to grow. Everything needs a place, it is well worth the money to stay organized.
    Very well said! The best time to start it is right now. There are two elements here: the physical storage and the information system. If you grow, eventually you'll create a work order system that should call out job-specific tools. The best way I found to do that is a numbering system that goes "Cabinet-Drawer-Slot" (the slot could be a grid). Another system needs to hold the info for what tool is in there (description, manufacturer, vendor, etc.). The final element is the replenishment system. You should use a "kanban card" (either tool specific or one you use like a dry erase or something). One goes to the buyer, the other stays in the "slot" to let you know it's on order. You will know you have a good system when you never have to go on a treasure hunt for tools, wonder if a tool is on order or not, wonder how many you have or use the wrong tool for a job.

    Good luck,
    The Dude


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