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  1. #21
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    Try calling up the department head at the Austin Community College manufacturing department. They dont have machining per se, but they have both engineering technology and welding 2 year degree programs. I have been hiring kids from CC welding programs for 3 decades now, and have consistently gotten reliable, hardworking, mechanically adept young people who are really interested in learning more. In my shop, I do what machining we need, mostly for tooling and some special parts, and my employees are more welder fabricators, but over the years I have had several who were amateur machinists already. A 2 year degree program kid has already spent their own time and money learning about tools, shop practice, shop math, materials, and is generally exactly the kind of person you want to train in the specialized stuff- I know, I have been doing exactly that since 1985. I know the instructors at three local schools, when I need somebody, I call em up, (not email, I talk to em and explain what skills I want) and they send me potential applicants to interview. The instructors pre-select their best students. I usually hire part time final semester kids, and then take me to full time when they graduate.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    Try calling up the department head at the Austin Community College manufacturing department. They dont have machining per se, but they have both engineering technology and welding 2 year degree programs. I have been hiring kids from CC welding programs for 3 decades now, and have consistently gotten reliable, hardworking, mechanically adept young people who are really interested in learning more. In my shop, I do what machining we need, mostly for tooling and some special parts, and my employees are more welder fabricators, but over the years I have had several who were amateur machinists already. A 2 year degree program kid has already spent their own time and money learning about tools, shop practice, shop math, materials, and is generally exactly the kind of person you want to train in the specialized stuff- I know, I have been doing exactly that since 1985. I know the instructors at three local schools, when I need somebody, I call em up, (not email, I talk to em and explain what skills I want) and they send me potential applicants to interview. The instructors pre-select their best students. I usually hire part time final semester kids, and then take me to full time when they graduate.
    This is a great idea. Pretty much sorts out the ones that aren’t TRULY interested in learning the trade.

  4. #23
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    I believe in a math test as if you are the type of person who is allergic to math and numbers you are not going to cut it as a machinist. There are people that would respond to an apprentice job, not even knowing much about what the job entails. On the other hand I think an I.Q. would be a waste. A good example would be my long departed step-dad. He was on a team that got one of the first hand held calculators to market. He understood all 60's and 70's electronics like the back of his hand. He did a lot of things well. His mechanical aptitude was ZERO, but pretty sure if he took a typical I.Q. test he would have scored genius numbers. On the other hand I have known good machinists and mechanics that were illiterate and would probably score moron level on an I.Q. test.

  5. #24
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    Art students. Some programs ingrain seeing details, the rest you train them on - they are apprentices. Nacogdoches kids (Austin college) have excitement for doing that is contagious from what I have seen in their metals program. Their craftsmanship is a little light - but you are training with mics and calipers.

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  7. #25
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    We use a test that is a mix of mechanical reasoning and cognitive ability. I also ask a few standard questions such as what they know about the company. Your local engineering colleges will be able to advertise your job vacancies to their students.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I believe in a math test as if you are the type of person who is allergic to math and numbers you are not going to cut it as a machinist. There are people that would respond to an apprentice job, not even knowing much about what the job entails. On the other hand I think an I.Q. would be a waste. A good example would be my long departed step-dad. He was on a team that got one of the first hand held calculators to market. He understood all 60's and 70's electronics like the back of his hand. He did a lot of things well. His mechanical aptitude was ZERO, but pretty sure if he took a typical I.Q. test he would have scored genius numbers. On the other hand I have known good machinists and mechanics that were illiterate and would probably score moron level on an I.Q. test.
    IQ tests are not legal for employment qualification. They are also not indicative of success.
    I

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    IQ tests are not legal for employment qualification. They are also not indicative of success.
    I
    Is that a state law or federal one?

  11. #28
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    I started with 3 kids, they were 13 years old. I paid them minimum wage and had their parents permission to work. They worked a couple hours everyday after school and 4 or 5 on saturday. One quit after a month, he didnt like this work at all. The second one was just plain terrible but he is a computer god, he still works for me doing cad stuff and programing. The third one is my prize, he is now 18 years old and can run every machine in the shop and make what ever I ask. My son has been working with me since he could walk. I have trained 3 other guys in our shop to run everything and do what needs to be done. Start with guys who know nothing, it takes a while but they will be clones of you and wont do things that make you mad. My guys run the machines just like I do. I hope to never lose them so I pay really well. I got alot of years invested in them.

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Is that a state law or federal one?
    It's a federal law.

  13. #30
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    *CMP, You might try trade schools at high school or college level.

    QT: [Zero tolerance policy for cell phones is kind of a joke in society today.]

    MY son disciplines himself on cell phone use and tells everybody not to call him at work unless an emergency. He will not call back until his break or pull his phone out of his pocket when on the clock. He stays busy on clock time. I think his bonus last year was $35K or so, on top of 30 bucks an hour. Go figure you don't get and hold jobs like that being the poor worker. He is a fix anything/everything mechanic at a large roofing company, not in tooling trades.
    But the job can be tough and he often comes home with back pain so he is considering taking up a new trade, perhaps elevator mechanic. Agree that likely is just as tough.
    At his last job he was the only mechanic who had keys to the owners race car garage.

    If I was the business owner I would tell workers up front that excessive use of computers and cell phones for personal use will put one on top of the lay-off list...yes along with poor work and scrap.

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