New login name, old member, clandestine shop exit advice wanted.
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  1. #1
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    Default New login name, old member, clandestine shop exit advice wanted.

    Hey guys, I have been a member for several years now. But I felt a thread about shop exits warranted some discretion so alas I am now known as turn and earn for the time being.


    7 years ago I came to work in a mom and pop shop. I have learned a lot from the shop, and helped grow their abilities beyond what they had to offer from when I was hired through my own trials and curiosities. I have enjoyed the experience 80% of the time.

    Recent events have put me on a path to seeking new employment. . . But that is another rant for another topic.

    I have started a very long and drawn out process of getting hired at a job that pays much more with better benefits. 3x the pay to be exact and honest.

    I have come to know the employer and his family very well. I don't wish for them to suffer upon my exit. I also don't want all my hard work to dissipate in the blink of an eye when I leave.

    I know the old saying, " they were looking for a monkey when they found you" somewhat applies but I have gained a lot of knowledge that no one else bothered to absorb.

    What would you do? Would you pop em with the old two week notice, Inform them that they will be needing a new you and so long suckers? Train a decent hire in the shadows and say here is the best bet you have?

    Breakups are so awkward for me.

    Kindest and best Regards,

    turnandearn

    YouTube

  2. #2
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    I would be inclinded to be honest and tell them you have been offered more money in another shop.

    Also move any of your expensive tools out before any shit hits the fan, should it turn nasty.

    Usually best to try and leave on the best terms if you can.

    Just my 2cs worth.

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  4. #3
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    As above ^^^^

    You may give them too much time, and they will ring up the new shop, have your
    new job cancelled.

    Ever think of that ?

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    I always gave two week notice. You tripled your pay? Did you strike it rich or were you working for attaboys at the old shop?

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    Tell them about your plans well in advance and help training a new hire.
    Treat them the way you'd like to be treated in this situation if it were your shop. Try to preserve good relationship.

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    I think you need to expand a little on your third sentence. Sounds like there is more than just money. Secondly, I also question the tripling of pay.

    Tom

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    Business is business.

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    Tripled? Good lord. Were you working for $10 an hour for seven years, or does your new job require burying bodies on your off hours?

    I mean, seriously, that's some nice work out of you, but if they're paying a third of fair market, they'll understand. Give them two weeks, longer if you think that'll be better, and then shake hands and say your goodbyes.

    In the back of every competent shop owner's mind is "here's what I'd do if this person left." Because we all do eventually, whether from a new job or retirement or whatever. The graveyards are full of indispensable men.

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    Just tell them. I have never held it against someone if they could better themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turnandearn View Post
    I have started a very long and drawn out process of getting hired
    I'd make sure I had the job before I did anything.

    Brent

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    Meet your obligations with the New employer, if they want you starting there in 2 weeks, 2 weeks it is.
    You can offer to help them out maybe a few hours evening/weekends for the transition after that if they need help and if it works out for you, but new job is #1.

    I wouldn't even mention the more money part, you'll probably just be counter-offered the wage increase you should have had years ago, and then it just gets insulting...

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    Quote Originally Posted by yardbird View Post
    I'd make sure I had the job before I did anything.

    Brent
    An echo on that advice, but also would suggest that you are overthinking this and taking on responsibility that is not yours. You are not responsible for how their business fares going forward; in fact, you are not responsible for how their business has fared even while you've been there. It's their business, not yours. As long as you have been and still are their employee, you are responsible for doing your best work for them, but they are responsible for allocating and using that work appropriately. It's their business, not yours. You have no responsibility to them after you complete your employment with them; they are responsible for finding your replacement, not you. It's their business, not yours.

    Yes, I'm going on a bit ... but I wonder if they might be (probably unconsciously) manipulating your sense of responsibility. It's a common pattern, often unconscious, rarely intentionally malicious, but ultimately unhealthy - putting responsibility on someone else, who attempts to shoulder it, and ultimately feels used and abused in the process.

    Just be professional. "I have appreciated my time here, and wasn't looking to leave, but I've gotten an opportunity that I just can't turn down." They certainly might press you for details, but keep them general; think ahead about what you are comfortable sharing and what you are not. Perhaps, "Thank you for asking. I can say that it is better pay, and an opportunity to learn new things and expand my abilities, but since I'm not sure what their policies are about the information they make public, that's all I can say at the moment." If they press further, simply demur, "As I said, I don't feel comfortable sharing any details. I want to honor their confidence just as I have always honored yours." (Assuming that last statement is true, of course!)

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    Just treat them as you'd like to be treated. Something like "thanks for the opportunity, and I have enjoyed working here but I'm moving on". No mention of increased pay would be useful here, maybe sometime in the future if you have a chance meeting.

    Oh yea, & Good luck,
    Matt

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    Just tell them the new job is NORTH of the M-D line.....

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    If moving on then give 2 weeks. NEVER make up a story. Moving on because you need a change. ANY other reason you give them provides them with an arguing point.argue.jpg

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    It's human nature to think that you are the only one who can do something or that you are not replaceable. The reality is that no business could survive if the employees could not be replaced.

    Most times if an employee has a unique skill that cannot be exactly replaced the company just changes focus slightly or moves to a different kind of work and life soon goes on like nothing ever happened.

    I can't tell you the number of shops I've been in where there is some hulk of a machine slowly decaying in a dark corner. When I inquire about it the story always goes something like "we had a guy who used to run it but he retired/quit/died/went to prison and no one else knows how to run it". Yet, the shop is still in business and life seems to be going on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    If moving on then give 2 weeks. NEVER make up a story. Moving on because you need a change. ANY other reason you give them provides them with an arguing point.argue.jpg
    Love the cartoon.

    Obvious answer though - you like to win an argument occasionally *and* not pay for it for ages afterwards...... which is not the answer I'd give my SO, funnily enough.

    PDW

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    If you have concerns about them quashing the new gig with innuendo, then just say you have another opportunity, but are not at liberty to discuss the details. Say it right at the top, and stick to it. The answer is the same for all guesses, right or wrong: Can't discuss it. Recommend they use the remaining time to get info related to their work from you, etc.

    If you want to do something 'extra', perhaps offer to sit in on their interviews of new candidates, if you can offer your opinion without incurring responsibility down the road (best in writing.)

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    Default New login name, old member, clandestine shop exit advice wanted.

    All good advice.

    From another perspective, in my opinion there are too many “mom and pop” shops that exist solely on the backs of skilled employees.

    Employees who are usually making less than they should be, and are often treated as disposable assets by mom and pop.

    Well, to be blunt, to hell with mom and pop!

    Precision machining is a high-skill, high-experience, high-intelligence business. Too many shop owners just have selling skills, they can’t machine their way out of a paper bag.

    The work produced by these shops may be acceptable, but it certainly doesn’t compare with the true professional, skilled shop.

    In most businesses, who markets and sells the best wins, not who has the best product or service!

    And that’s just bullshit.

    I for one believe he who has the best product or service should win...it only makes sense.

    And if “mom and pop” don’t have it, then why care what happens after you leave?

    Our industry needs Darwin to work a little harder at weeding out the pretenders...

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  29. #20
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    3x pay doesn't make sense to me. You were either working way to cheap or the boss man at the new place might have you deliver packages on your way home.

    I don't like burning bridges but you can't do anything to jeopardize the new job. You could possibly maintain a "consulting" relationship with the old shop to help them keep the ball rolling. If they fail, that's business.


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