Newbie: What is Expected Day 1 on the job? Career Advice Welcomed - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobw View Post
    I know somebody like that.. They kept getting fired.. The reason was that they were SO GOOD!!!!! at every job, that they made everybody else look SOOOOO!!! BAD!!! that management couldn't keep them around.. Bad for moral when everybody else is so inferior to the Most Stupendous waiter AppleBee's ever had.
    Hey, I know one as well.
    Just a couple months ago: Me: "what happened over there man? I heard that place was hoppin". Him: "Production manager didn't like me cause I am smarter than him".

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    If you show up on time sober with your brain turned on ready to learn, you're already ahead of many.
    If that's even almost true then things "over there" must be very bad. Turn up here anywhere and you're not sober your next job will be looking for a new job.

    No, I'm not saying it never happens but you will be fired.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    If that's even almost true then things "over there" must be very bad. Turn up here anywhere and you're not sober your next job will be looking for a new job.

    No, I'm not saying it never happens but you will be fired.
    Just a WAG, but probably not as much sober as not hungover, but I don't want to put words in someone's mouth.

    However, you have to realize comparing Denmark (and toss in a few more Euro countries) size wise we aren't even on the same page! US is almost 3.8mil sq miles, Denmark is 16.5k sq miles (yes 16,500 roughly).

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    If that's even almost true then things "over there" must be very bad. Turn up here anywhere and you're not sober your next job will be looking for a new job.

    No, I'm not saying it never happens but you will be fired.
    My limited experience in Europe says it is just as prevalent there as here. Definitions are different though. The company I worked for in the US, in the tool room if you showed up smelling of alcohol you would be asked to go home as a skilled laborer. Production was usually teminated. Didn’t matter what or why or when. Same company, in the tool room in Germany, had beer in the vending machines.

    When my dad was managing a plant in Reims, he had issues with some employees that were drunks. We would call them drunks, the French did not, and nothing happened.

    When I worked in the Netherlands (for a VERY short time) I was offered alcohol on the job on a regular basis. To have coworkers return from lunch with sparkling eyes and alcohol on their breathe was normal. All fireable offenses in the US.

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  7. #25
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    Just go in there a little early if you have tools, and be ready to grunt work for a bit. Machinist are like being back in the locker room in high school. If they see that you can hang in there and show up everyday ready to go. I had guys that wouldn't even talk to me or ask my name until I was there for 6 months. Had some that told me that but after a few weeks they were talking to me like man your a worker kind of guy we need around here. Before you know it your going to be accepted and doing more in a short time than you think.
    Machining is a career path that will take you as far as you want to go. I started out as green as you can be asking questions, doing any task giving to me, and watching videos or reading books at home. Now 10 years in I made it into Tool and Die from job shop. The company is amazing make great money and great benefits. Now, I'm starting my own small shop with 1 machine in the evenings, and weekends. You can go as far as you want to go with this trade hands down. There will be negative people but there will always be those guys. No one came into the trade knowing everything there is to know. They just want to discourage you, mess with you, or just hate their own life.

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    If that's even almost true then things "over there" must be very bad. Turn up here anywhere and you're not sober your next job will be looking for a new job.

    No, I'm not saying it never happens but you will be fired.

    Who consumes more alcohol? If it is bad over here it must be a lot worse by you. List of countries by alcohol consumption per capita - Wikipedia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    If that's even almost true then things "over there" must be very bad. Turn up here anywhere and you're not sober your next job will be looking for a new job.

    No, I'm not saying it never happens but you will be fired.
    I was rolling everything into "sober with your brain turned on".
    Pot, prescription meds that mess with brain/coordination/concentration, hangovers, even just major lack of sleep or too distracted by something else can be bad.

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    many cnc have many buttons and nobody and i mean nobody can walk up to a cnc they never saw or used before without needing some training on it. its normal to need 1 or more months of training on each cnc
    Oh Tom, but there are ppl that walk up to a cnc we never saw, and not only learn how to operate it, but we learn how it works, what parts it is made of and which part has which function. And all usually in a day or two. And then we repair them. Forgot to say that the machines we learn are usually broken, and we must be able to extrapolate proper working conditions based on what we see. They call us CNC service tehnicians/magicians. Depends how one looks at it. Somewhat more easily found then the proverbial unicorn, but not by much really. So, to recap, my job requires to have operating, programming and setting up all various kinds of machines in my little finger, that is like 10% of my total knowledge. Of the knowledge that is reguired to repair broken machines. Often without any manuals. Or anyone really, who knows how to operate said machine. I also have to have an complete knowledge of all various controls (30+ models and makes), electronics, electrics, servo motors and drives, PLC interface computers, hydraulics, pneumatics, machine kinematic, just to mention a few. Interesting job, isnt it?

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    And as for the OP's question - I am frequently in the position to train new ppl in various companies I work for (service related work). Since schools for metal vocation here are becoming an joke, and no good ppl ready to work come out of them anymore, only solution for company owners here is to train them. Make them. And since they have neither the time or will, thats where I step in. I am going to tell you my take on it. If you have the will to work, if you put in the time needed, you will progress. Will to work, you wanting to do your best in this metal producing is No.1. Dedication, be serious about your job. In 80% of cases such ppl are made to be proper and quality machinists over the years.

  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnc_machinist View Post
    Oh Tom, but there are ppl that walk up to a cnc we never saw, and not only learn how to operate it, but we learn how it works, what parts it is made of and which part has which function. And all usually in a day or two. And then we repair them. Forgot to say that the machines we learn are usually broken, and we must be able to extrapolate proper working conditions based on what we see. They call us CNC service tehnicians/magicians. Depends how one looks at it. Somewhat more easily found then the proverbial unicorn, but not by much really. So, to recap, my job requires to have operating, programming and setting up all various kinds of machines in my little finger, that is like 10% of my total knowledge. Of the knowledge that is reguired to repair broken machines. Often without any manuals. Or anyone really, who knows how to operate said machine. I also have to have an complete knowledge of all various controls (30+ models and makes), electronics, electrics, servo motors and drives, PLC interface computers, hydraulics, pneumatics, machine kinematic, just to mention a few. Interesting job, isnt it?
    I started a new job as a machine designer doing Cad design. Next day they fired the one CNC operator running a Fadal 4020. The owner asked if anyone had CNC experience. I had played with an old Bandit on a knee mill and said I would take the manual home and see if I could handle it until they hired a new guy. I ran the machine for about two months doing all the programming by hand mostly for castings and such and used macros a lot. Then they hired a very good CNC operator. I was still doing the programming. A month goes by and one day he says to me "You do some really trick programming, how many years you been doing it?" I said 3 months. He says "Yeah I know you've been here 3 months, but how many years CNC programming?" I said 3 months. He said how is that possible? I said well I have done PC programming and to me it's just a big printer. When I make mistake its written in metal!

    So yeah some of us don't get scared off by lots of buttons.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    I started a new job as a machine designer doing Cad design. Next day they fired the one CNC operator running a Fadal 4020. The owner asked if anyone had CNC experience. I had played with an old Bandit on a knee mill and said I would take the manual home and see if I could handle it until they hired a new guy. I ran the machine for about two months doing all the programming by hand mostly for castings and such and used macros a lot. Then they hired a very good CNC operator. I was still doing the programming. A month goes by and one day he says to me "You do some really trick programming, how many years you been doing it?" I said 3 months. He says "Yeah I know you've been here 3 months, but how many years CNC programming?" I said 3 months. He said how is that possible? I said well I have done PC programming and to me it's just a big printer. When I make mistake its written in metal!

    So yeah some of us don't get scared off by lots of buttons.
    I took a new job, moving out of state with my family. It turned out to be Yasnac I80 control and I had run/programmed only Haas and one Fanuc robodrill... Woof what a time! It took me an entire day to get the machine homed (hadn't been run in months), kept faulting out and over-travelling > which led me back to the manual as no one had a clue what was wrong, hell they could barely spell CNC LoL.... Had to get into parameters (I know some of you this is childs play) and being a Haas guy mostly it's like learning a foreign language haha. So ya, once you been in this for a while you get to sort of know what to look for when problems come up and you figure it out.

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    Showing up to work on time every day and doing what you are told is essential. Attitude is important because anyone new has much better instruction if they are likable. Sure the young fellows and gals should get along with the older and experienced characters who are everywhere in our trade.

    I worked in a shop early on where my mentor would pick up any scales and spring calipers that were left out. He put them in his box and would open the drawer and show them to you as his finds. No one touched his toolbox ever.

    He and his brother who worked there hunted rattlesnakes and would make belts out of them. Very good ones. They would bring them to work in a wooden box labeled Rattle Snakes keep back. First time I saw it I thought it was a joke. They opened it up to show me- no joke. Interesting experience and they had great stories about their fishing and hunting.

    One of the brothers would get his fishing pole and get Camo on and crawl through a Farmers field to fish on private property. He got a adrenaline kick out of it a full grown man with kids and a top notch do it all Machinist. My point is they are all great people those who grace our trade. They will help someone learn what they know but they have to like you first and you will pay homage for the directions.

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    First day...I would expect to show up a few minutes early, dressed to work, with a pen to fill out paperwork and a notepad to start taking notes.

  18. #34
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    Show up early.
    Be a good listener and be humble.
    Ask when you don't quite get it, never wing it.
    You are low man on the totem pole, understand that, swallow your pride and earn the respect of those grumpy old farts.
    Park the cell phone in the car until you are told you should use one as a calculator or maybe even viewing prints.
    Stand up straight, respectfully ask questions when things not clear, pay attention.
    It is no different than it has always been.
    I would never expect any new employee to understand my floor and processes.
    A I know cncs and all practices attitude leads to being setup to fail ......not so good and you will not be happy or treated well by the others around you.
    Bob


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