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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsurgeon View Post
    The company I work for (been here over 8 years) is kind of in a state of transition. Its a small shop, fewer than 10 employees with 1 foreman. The current owner is looking to sell the business and retire.

    It appears that the owners son will be buying the business itself, downsizing quite a bit and moving to a location with lower rent. We have probably twice as many machines as we need due to a decline in business the last few years.

    That being said, they have approached me, informed me of all this and offered me the foremans position in the new downsized shop. Obviously, none of my coworkers know this yet and nothing is set in stone anyway. I was informed the current foreman will not be retaining his position in the new shop, but not by his own choice. He does not know they offered me his position, but does know about a “potential downsizing and move.”

    All that being said, it is a position I have been looking forward to having the opportunity to be in. When they first approached me I didnt put too much stake in it as it was just an idea (the sale of the business and downsizing and moving) but now its actually starting to look like it is going to happen within the next few months. They have struck a deal on new, smaller building close by and I am being asked for input on which machines to keep, their layout in the new shop and which employees to keep.

    I was told to be thinking about salary and benefits I would want to stick around, be foreman and help the son get up and running. Looking for advice on what to ask for and advice on what to do as a foreman. I can say that I have a good idea of what not to do from watching my current foreman for 8 plus years. I am currently making $25/hr ($52k/year before taxes) as a lead man with a small profit share, 3 weeks of PTO time, and 4% IRA match.
    Congratulations steelsurgeon,

    Despite what you referred to a downsized shop, you have obviously climbed the latter. There will be, (my opinion) a tremendous need for your skills in the future,
    you will have plenty of high paying positions available to you.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I thought property tax rates were pretty close throughout states, I guess not. California has over 50 counties and all their rates were pretty similar when I lived there.
    A whole lot seems to vary based on the home and land value. The higher the evaluation the more that is paid. Taxation can be variable even more than it generally is when a area is in a phase of growth. The more business and people who move in often will increase values and taxes for services. This is what happens with large cities which eventually become Metroplexes. They grow and so all the smaller towns eventually it is hard to tell when small town begins except for a sign. It is essentially one city. Taxes and values tend to get closer together.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    No offense, but you apparently have never played with the big boys. My last job at a mega corp, I was salaried at 78k when I got laid off. They paid me to relocate twice, flew me into Indonesia twice (maybe 3?), 4 star hotel, all paid meals, I more or less lived in CO for about 3 months on their dime, hotel, car rental, meals, etc. Paid car rental and hotel before I moved into FL from SC... blah blah. They are out there, even for a "lowly" machinist or programmer.

    I am so very impressed.

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  5. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by toolsteel View Post
    I live in what many ppl consider a place with "low cost of living".
    Property and homes are cheaper than many areas. Property taxes and local taxes are relatively low. In part because the citiots that have lake / vacation property get hammered at tax time. No real representation at the table because they are seasonal. My auto insurance is noticably lower. Aside from that everything else is actually more expensive. Electricity rates are higher. Food cost is MUCH higher at the 2 or 3 local grocery stores (local = within a 15 minute drive). Fuel cost is higher. Anything that you would purchase from any store is higher priced. Hardware, lumber, clothing, electronics, household goods....when possible we make a bi-weekly 60-90 minute or so run to a larger city to get all that stuff or i may pick it up on my commute. Add to that the cost of maintaining your own water and septic system.
    Not bitching about it...I love living in a rural area and will do what it takes to continue to do so. Just pointing out that the only thing other than the few items i mentioned that are lower is wages. To make what I consider a decent wage I commute....its the price I pay. I accept it.
    I always liked the small towns and the country. At this stage I do not want to be very far from what is available healthcare wise, family wise, and convenience wise. Land outside of town is no problem really because it is close enough. Many people do not really know much about their own state and the actual lay of the land. They can spend most of their life in this State or others and never really see much of it.

    They essentially take the kind of outlook of someone searching for something on Google they are led to where they are to be directed basically. The more family generations in a area will have more historical and local knowledge. They know what locals do.

  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsurgeon View Post
    This is basically how it has worked out. I took a modest bump up front ($2/hr) with the agreement we are going to revisit the compensation question in 6 months after this sale is finalized and the son is the official owner. (Son was in on the talks) I told them I dont particularly care to be salaried and wasnt going to do the system they had the previous foreman under (45 hr weeks standard, anything over that was paid straight hourly wage not 1.5x, a modified salary whatever that means). So we agreed I would stay hourly, $2/hr bump and get normal 1.5x overtime for now.

    In private talks with the son, we have determined we are in the ball park of eachother as far as what I will receive once he owns the shop. Somewhere around an additional $3/hr bump to make it ~$5/hr total, an extra week PTO, and a nice percentage profit share to stick around.

    It may not be the deal some would take but this is a relatively low stress job, in a small shop close to home, and to get anything more, my commute have to atleast double. I dont feel like I am being screwed. If anything, Ill do this for a while or so and move on with a little more gained experience and a resume boost.
    Congrats. You swung a deal that works for you and you are reaping benefits from your abilities.
    You didnt ask for this advice...but...WTF we are on Practical Machinist...lol.
    I have been in and out of supervision at various times. Lead by example....dont ask someone to do something that you are unwilling to do. When you end up with a disagreement with an employee (and you will) Take it off the shop floor. I worked for a guy for a very short period of time who would have confrontational discussions with employees on the shop floor in front of co-workers. He lost good people because when confronted that way people are forced to react....and sometimes that reaction is not what you would expect. Its time to acquire a new set of skills.

    Good luck

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  8. #106
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    I am in a similar situation myself. My foremen has been at out shop since 89 and I have been his little sidekick for around 8yrs. Within the next 5-7 yrs he will retire, the owners are going to retire and their 2 sons will take over and the transition will be in full swing. I haven't received the best training to take his spot but in the future the 2 sons and I know what we want to change, and revise and we are just going to go at it and see what happens.

    Seems like you have a good opportunity to revamp the shop with the new owner and make it "your" shop floor. Always pros and cons in situations like these, but if you go in positive and the new owner is on board, you can really turn a place around. I hope it works out with either decision you make.

  9. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by toolsteel View Post
    When you end up with a disagreement with an employee (and you will) Take it off the shop floor. I worked for a guy for a very short period of time who would have confrontational discussions with employees on the shop floor in front of co-workers. He lost good people because when confronted that way people are forced to react....and sometimes that reaction is not what you would expect. Its time to acquire a new set of skills.

    Good luck
    That is good advice, no one wants to be embarrassed in front of their peers, especially in this day and age.
    I violated that commandment one time, and I have no issue doing it. I even got a polite reprimand from a higher up that I really needed to work on my people skills, that was the last straw working for that company. This was over a safety violation a guy vehemently denied committing that I watched him do. When he started talking back I gave him both barrels in front of god and everybody. That pretty much started a personal battle that did not end till I left. The place was non union, but had a lot of union like practices. You could not can someone who passed probation unless you built a case that got approval passed 3 rungs up the ladder.

  10. #108
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    Where I was ,as soon as the father had transferred the business (but still held veto over spending over a certain amount),and retired to a hobby vineyard ,the sons wife started to bring the two boys in for childminding when there was no school......in short order,it was kids in the office at 8am,I had to take them to school at 9,and pickup at 3,son and wife would go out shopping ,and ask me to look after the kids until 6.....When the father found out,he accused me of disloyalty.....with the "I trusted you-----etc lecture",and I left ......but I gotta admit it was a lot of fun riding mini motorbikes around the sales lot,and having cookouts in the back yard.

  11. #109
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    Default Offered Foreman Position-Need Tips/Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by toolsteel View Post
    Congrats. You swung a deal that works for you and you are reaping benefits from your abilities.
    You didnt ask for this advice...but...WTF we are on Practical Machinist...lol.
    I have been in and out of supervision at various times. Lead by example....dont ask someone to do something that you are unwilling to do. When you end up with a disagreement with an employee (and you will) Take it off the shop floor. I worked for a guy for a very short period of time who would have confrontational discussions with employees on the shop floor in front of co-workers. He lost good people because when confronted that way people are forced to react....and sometimes that reaction is not what you would expect. Its time to acquire a new set of skills.

    Good luck
    Thanks for that advice. I already try to do the lead by example thing in other aspects of my life and will try to here as well. As far as disagreements, I agree with you and would like to think its obvious that airing out grievances is best done behind closed doors, but we all know its not obvious enough to some people. I will do my best. I am fairly level headed, it takes a lot to really get me worked up which should be a good thing in this position I think.

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  13. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Where I was ,as soon as the father had transferred the business (but still held veto over spending over a certain amount),and retired to a hobby vineyard ,the sons wife started to bring the two boys in for childminding when there was no school......in short order,it was kids in the office at 8am,I had to take them to school at 9,and pickup at 3,son and wife would go out shopping ,and ask me to look after the kids until 6.....When the father found out,he accused me of disloyalty.....with the "I trusted you-----etc lecture",and I left ......but I gotta admit it was a lot of fun riding mini motorbikes around the sales lot,and having cookouts in the back yard.
    Yeah thats a clusterf***. I would not stick around for that.

  14. #111
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    You would have stayed if there was ...minibikes...

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