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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronReb View Post
    The time saved from looking for tooling plus money saved from buying shit you already have will pay for cabinets.
    Keep your eyes open for places that sell used office furniture because filing cabinets work well to keep light weight stuff stored away.

    But the biggest issue you are gonna have is getting everyone there in the habit of putting things back were they belong.
    $$$$ worth of cabinets mean jack shit if there are more tools on the headstocks and work benches than in the cabinet.
    That is exactly the issue. I cant setup a machine without running around for 3 hours trying to find tools. Not counting the other jobs I have in the shop getting in the way.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Carts? Loaded from (and returned to) a central place, but with everything you need for a job right at the machine. Depending upon the size of your shop, you can also spend a lot of time running back to get what's needed.

    Part of the trick is good enough documentation to know what you need for each job.
    Each machine does have good setup sheets, and tools that are only used on said machine. But drills, mill, taps, boring bars, inserts, ect., can almost be interchanged with any of the machines in the shop. Some of the tool holders as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by scadvice View Post
    At the end of the shift or day... a fifteen minute clean up of your machine and area is a job requirement no matter how busy the shop is. The supervisor or boss also is required to oversee and enforce. They also need to setup up a 'requirements for end of shift cleanup' document on each machine area as to what is required.

    If you want a certain standard you have to first let them know what that standard is in writing. Otherwise they will have their own ...or lack thereof.

    It needs to be enforced so that they understand it not just one of those 'passing things bosses do' and they can go on their merry little way later.

    It's called developing a shop culture.
    Usually our clean up is on Fridays, but its never to late to change that.

    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    While plenty of toolboxes/drawers are a good thing, I'm not sure how useful they are for tools in use. I like tool racks, with sized holes to stand tools up on end. However, I typically use a degradation system where slightly used tools are kept for rougher work or for possible shortening for reuse as a new tool. So rack areas should be designed with a system in mind for keeping pristine tools, slightly used, and badly damaged, all three separate.

    3/4" UHMW sheet makes a nice tool rack material. If you have the time, you can even make up end sheets with dadoes in a cabinet frame of sorts, and the UHMW is heavy enough to serve as it's own combination drawer, and drawer slide.
    We do the same, boards are drill and hung to fit standard drill,ream, mill, tap and die sizes and used tools go there. Most of the time they are not good enough to use on plastic let alone steel or aluminum.

    Our good tools are with the machines, but its not really organized as well as it could be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I like to hang box wrenches and crescent wrenches from nails/screws. Much less time than digging through a drawer.

    I have a few Vidmars I've picked up, the biggest is a 60x60x30 and it holds an insane amount of shit. My 2500 Hyster can't pick it up with the drawers in it.

    Probably the best thing I figured out is getting rid of shit I don't need. It's amazing how much shit you can accumulate.
    Your telling me! When I took over the shop at the beginning of this year, I bet I threw away 200-300 tools, all of them were absolute junk. Why they were still around will never be answered.

    Anyway Ill look into some of the things you guys suggested and get back to ya, thanks again!

  2. #22
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    Let me ask a more in depth question.

    On the cabinets that hold your tools, how do you have them marked? Alphabetical? According to the tool? And why?

  3. #23
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    Agree that your will likely be able to pay for cabinets with avoidances on new tool purchases. I would look on eBay or maybe other auction sites and look for used cabinets (Lista, Vidmar, etc.). IMO, there's only ONE way to do this right and it will take a while:

    1. Take a pretty good assessment of what you'll need for drawer sizes and heights; allow at least 10% extra for initial expansion.
    2. Organize tools by type and size; putting ONE tool in ONE bin. Give each tool a "name" that can at least reside in a spreadsheet or your job shop ERP system.
    3. Come up with a replenishment system that is ideally card based (e.g. laminated card that can be written on with a wet erase).
    4. Call the tools out on jobs per the name/storage locn (gives a "double check").

    If it's not 100%, it'll fall apart and/or need major clean-ups at regular intervals. If it's 100% organized, it stands a good chance of surviving, if you enforce it.

    That's it in a nutshell, any more ? shoot me a PM.

    Good luck, the effort is worth it!
    The Dude

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tap_or_Die View Post
    Hi guys,

    Im looking at organizing our shop. Maybe a lot. All tools are spread threw out the shop, every machine station has hundreds of loose tools, drills, endmills, taps, etc. So Im thinking a couple tool cabinets would be great so all the tools are in one place. Has anybody tried those cabinets in the unline catalog, Has 168 bins, ranging in size of course. Or any other suggestions would be good.


    For me, the biggest "aha moment" was when I won an Empty Huot fractional drill dispenser at an auction... The day after I started filling that one, I then bought several more (new)... The smaller ones are like $80 each new, and although they don't have BB guides, I greased them all before using and they are perfect for the job. I have a cheap, but accurate caliper sat by them, and if I don't recall EXACTLY which drawer I got drills from, I set them in a little tub next to the drawers, and will occasionally have a "measure and replace" session... The fractional, letter and number drawers all have the "decimal" equivalent under the label, so it's foolproof...

    Before this, I had several drill indexes, with a few empty holes, and duplicates scattered everywhere. Now, I can simply look at each drawer, and decide what I need to re-order anything of. It saves me a LOT of time, and takes up a lot less room, especially as they stack on top of each other.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tap_or_Die View Post
    That is exactly the issue. I cant setup a machine without running around for 3 hours trying to find tools. Not counting the other jobs I have in the shop getting in the way.



    Each machine does have good setup sheets, and tools that are only used on said machine. But drills, mill, taps, boring bars, inserts, ect., can almost be interchanged with any of the machines in the shop. Some of the tool holders as well.


    Well - a toolholder that is currently being used elsewhere kant really be changed, but as far as drills, I have twists in a Hout drill cabinet. You know - the big one with 4 drawers and holds at least a package qty of each drill size, fraction, number, and letter, plus a big drawer in the bottom for storage of TL, S&D, or just extras...

    I don't hafta look for twist drills!

    I doo however like to use a good used drill for a short run - should one exist, and this is where I spend too much time (in the name of no "waste"). We have a cpl drawers dedicated to used/good drills that come off of that machine, but it can take time to sort through them all. I really want to pony up and git yet another 4 drawer cabinet for just used drills.

    There is a cpl drawers that we keep most of the smaller (1.25 or smaller?) spades, Sumo's, Gen3's. Ass_u_ming that the tool that you need aint currently in some app elsewhere of course. (quite possibly just hanging out - not necessarily in use always either...

    Another drawer just for taps. New and used.

    Standard inserts are mostly in one drawer. A used one should go in the first pocket of the pack if applicable.

    Wrenches that are common set-up tools - live right on the machine.


    On the cabinets that hold your tools, how do you have them marked? Alphabetical? According to the tool? And why?
    Alphabetical?





    By size. Whether it is a collet, an insert, shank size, SIZE (number) werks for me.


    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tap_or_Die View Post
    Let me ask a more in depth question.

    On the cabinets that hold your tools, how do you have them marked? Alphabetical? According to the tool? And why?
    Typically there is a drawer label slot where you can put "Drills: fractional, number and letter" or whatever is in there. Then you roll it out and see additional labels (one on each bin) with the location bin, tool name and size info "i.e. 1-B-15" (drawer 1, row B, spot 15,) next row is DF-15 (code for fractional drill 15) and the description line say 5/32" (i.e. so three lines total).

    If you do this in Excel, you can give the guys a printout sorted several ways. That way, if you add a special reamer size that doesn't fit with the originals (sits in another drawer), they can find it (looking at the report sorted by type and size, it will tell them that the X.XXX size reamer is in 4-C-18 spot and not the 2-G-XX where all the others are). In theory, this is only needed for new job set-ups or one-offs where you make the shop let the call. If it's a repeater, you want to document this and get the tool info to print out on the job router.

    The Dude

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  11. #27
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    Our machines are all old, we end up making special 't' nuts for them. The last batch we made were specific for one machine. I actually stamped the end of each 't' nut 'SP' (small planer), and put them in one of those blue storage bins that clip to a rack on the wall.

    I recon, in another couple of dozen years each machine will have its own set of identifiable 't' nuts..... hours of frustration saved

    ( or in reality we will still end up with 2 crappy 3/4 whit nuts, that jam in the slots , with a piece of M20 wedged in them on the radial arm )

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    A Brother P-Touch label maker and a bunch of laminated tape cartridges of different widths will make your life a LOT easier. It will take a while to get stuff labeled, and you'll wonder about how many cartridges you are going to have to buy...... but it will be WELL WORTH IT in the long run.

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  14. #29
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    Ox for dealing with drills I have the Hout cabinets for drills but I normally only keep new drills in them. I have a couple of sets of the individual indexes, the folding ones and I put them out closest to the machines. I use them to supply the drills for the machines and when one gets dull or gets under a shelf, I go get a new one from the Hout cabinet. Works very good for all but the odd drills and that is what I use the space in the back of the Hout cabinet drawers for.

    Of course I also have a few blocks of wood or plastic where I keep tap drills and taps in and those are also close to the machines. Not everything is perfect but at least I have not come into the issue of sorting through boxes of mixed drills yet.

    Charles

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    These are *great* for organizing...

    Gripper and Round Jars with Caps

    I bought several dozen of them. I use them in the engineering shop. The square ones fit evenly in a double-wide x 7" deep Lista drawer. (IIRC 6 deep x 14 wide or so) These are all labeled with the P-touch. They store bolts, nuts, air fittings, wire clamps, and a wide variety of other small bits and pieces we keep stock of. I keep drills, taps, reamers and end mills in the small round ones. They are cheap and the bottles are tough.

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  17. #31
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    One other things I forgot...if you enter all your tools into a spreadsheet (three columns of many rows, each tool on a row with storage bin, name, description), you can do what's called a "mail merge". Imagine a table of first name, last name, address, city, etc. You can basically make all the labels at one like on the small return address labels. If you don't know how to do it, just youtube it or, better yet, give a special project to the "shop PC nerd" who likely already knows how!

    The Dude

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tap_or_Die View Post
    Let me ask a more in depth question.

    On the cabinets that hold your tools, how do you have them marked? Alphabetical? According to the tool? And why?
    I only have a few of the cabinets and boxes labelled so far. The labels just identify the type(s) of tools in the drawer or on the shelf. They are for quick reference so that if someone is looking for a type of tool they can scan the box quickly to find where it is. The labels are mainly for the benefit of people who don't spend a lot of time in the shop, but occasionally need to get a tool.

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    I can't help but think that the biggest problem might be to get people putting tools back into the cupboards or drawers they came from no matter how many get bought. The BIG issue IMO will be an attitude problem. Things seem to have drifted for so long it's now so that the company is forced to do something. Force isn't exactly a good motivator.

    "I made the machinist an offer he couldn't refuse" ???????

    Anyway good luck - you'll need it

    Gordon

    I looked in YouTube for ideas but could only find this. Not what's wanted in this thread but fascinating to watch.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NbNcG3uSqw

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    Great ideas guys, i say ideas but Im sure these have all been in use for a long time. Just happens that our shop has never been organized at all. First hurdle is going to be the initial cost of buying the tool cabinets. From what I can gather Ill need anywhere from 2000-4500 budget, but it needs to be done. Now I have to get the C/O to okay it. Being a small shop Ill have to push him a bit but I think he'll bite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by IronReb View Post
    I made tooling to do a job once and have held onto it for about 8 years now.
    We were having a house cleaning a few months ago and I decided to chunk all of it because it has been over 8 years since we did this job and
    last heard there was a machine shop running these parts at 300 pieces a year so no way I will ever need that tooling I made again.

    WRONG!!
    The customer we did this for 8 years ago now wants us to do 150 pieces a year and the other shop do the balance....SOB!!!
    5s in a machine shop is a big no-no in my book.... to a point. cleaning and organization is still needed. which reminds me to listen to my last statement.

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    I like a shadow board for tools that are needed at the machine. The coolest ones I ever used were at a medical manufacturing facility. We took 1" thick white plastic and milled the shape of every tool needed plus a little clearance and a finger groove to remove the tools from the pockets. Each board was custom to each machine all throughout the facility. The shadow board was then attached to the work bench on about a 75* angle. It was totally obvious if something was missing like the every absent pack of metric allen wrenches. We would always get complements on customer tours.

  25. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by snocat_trf View Post
    5s in a machine shop is a big no-no in my book.... to a point. cleaning and organization is still needed. which reminds me to listen to my last statement.
    You mean having a set of tools for one specific job, and another set of tools (even though they could be the same) for another job? That to me is just a waste of money. However having a 5s style to specific machine boxes make a lot of sense. Especially for hand/setup tools and jaws/tool holders that only pertain to that machine. Makes for fast setups and easy put away.


    Quote Originally Posted by bw_4000 View Post
    I like a shadow board for tools that are needed at the machine. The coolest ones I ever used were at a medical manufacturing facility. We took 1" thick white plastic and milled the shape of every tool needed plus a little clearance and a finger groove to remove the tools from the pockets. Each board was custom to each machine all throughout the facility. The shadow board was then attached to the work bench on about a 75* angle. It was totally obvious if something was missing like the every absent pack of metric allen wrenches. We would always get complements on customer tours.
    I have thought about shadow boards, but making them would take a lot of my time, and just buying a cabinet sounds much easier. If I have to reorganize in the future I would have to make new shadow boards. Cabinets all I have to do is move some things around and re-tag the drawer.

  26. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bw_4000 View Post
    I like a shadow board for tools that are needed at the machine. The coolest ones I ever used were at a medical manufacturing facility. We took 1" thick white plastic and milled the shape of every tool needed plus a little clearance and a finger groove to remove the tools from the pockets. Each board was custom to each machine all throughout the facility. The shadow board was then attached to the work bench on about a 75* angle. It was totally obvious if something was missing like the every absent pack of metric allen wrenches. We would always get complements on customer tours.
    I hate shadow boards, they take up far too much space. A properly organized toolbox or cabinet is just as fast and takes up 1/10 the space. Unless you have to do Aerospace/Medical work where tool tracking has to be done on every step of a job, there is no reason to waste the real estate.

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    Of course it happens on the days following my chance to start organizing the shop. Im in need of a 9/32 sm drill, nothing fancy, but guess what......I DONT HAVE ONE!!!!!!!.

    Things are getting ready to change!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonytn36 View Post
    These are *great* for organizing...
    Gripper and Round Jars with Caps
    Costco sells the 32 oz ones, but they are filled with cashews and other mixed nuts.

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