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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Dickman View Post
    I bet you could also save a ton of money by directing your employees to only flush the toilet after every other piss.
    If it's yellow let it mellow.

  2. #22
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    It would probably save more money if you shut the lights off at lunch

    Tony is much smarter than i am, but i wonder about leaving on hard drives. Of course in his business the down time is very low compared to mine

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    He's a slave owner....
    Chain them up, feed them if they meet quota.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    Chain them up, feed them if they meet quota.

    Hey...let the mind work and sometimes it comes up with ingenious ways to make a little extra -n- loose a little less.

    Sometimes the mind just has you running in circles trying to catch your tail.



    I think I found a couple good ways to come ahead a bit:

    Updated all the lighting...we now have twice the amount of light then we used to and it cost the same. Wish I had waited a bit more and went with LED...but down the road that is what I'll swap over to...brighter and less costly yet again.

    Electronic Programmable Thermostats- Temp drops automatically after we close then comes back up just before we come in. Saved several hundred even with gas price increases and its more comfortable.

    Last one is small regulators on the blow gun hoses. $9 bucks at Knuckle Busters USA, line pressure is now 40psi instead of 125. Chips and coolant still get cleared but now my compressor gets to take a break where I had it running pretty much continuously.


    Some call it being cheap...but a dollar saved is a dollar earned and every bit of reduced overhead helps the bottom line.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIM View Post
    Hey...let the mind work and sometimes it comes up with ingenious ways to make a little extra -n- loose a little less.

    Sometimes the mind just has you running in circles trying to catch your tail.



    I think I found a couple good ways to come ahead a bit:

    Updated all the lighting...we now have twice the amount of light then we used to and it cost the same. Wish I had waited a bit more and went with LED...but down the road that is what I'll swap over to...brighter and less costly yet again.

    Electronic Programmable Thermostats- Temp drops automatically after we close then comes back up just before we come in. Saved several hundred even with gas price increases and its more comfortable.

    Last one is small regulators on the blow gun hoses. $9 bucks at Knuckle Busters USA, line pressure is now 40psi instead of 125. Chips and coolant still get cleared but now my compressor gets to take a break where I had it running pretty much continuously.


    Some call it being cheap...but a dollar saved is a dollar earned and every bit of reduced overhead helps the bottom line.
    You can bill it as being 'green' as well.
    FWIW I always hated high pressure air guns.
    Way to easy to lose an eye.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Compressed air is one of the least efficient, and most expensive, forms of energy in a machine shop. I work in a lot of shops and I usually work through lunch. When the machines are idle, the typical machine shop is filled with a continuous hissing sound.
    The thing I hate most about running off a Phase-Perfect that is inside the shop. It sounds exactly like a freaking air-leak!

    Tony beat me to it. Punch the clown-nose, and leave it idle.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Many electronic devices are less tolerant of frequent switching on and off rather than just being left on. You might save some electricity, but find that after some years there's an uptick in maintenance required.
    Yes.



    ------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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  9. #28
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    Default Loctite 545

    0150584.jpg

    On the air leak front, we had a significant reduction in air consumption by having our intern spend a couple hours a week redoing PTFE taped pipe fittings with Loctite 545. I have banned PTFE tape on all new work unless plastic is involved or it needs to be pressurized immediately. Tape works well on good fittings, but there are a lot of crappy pipe fittings. Loctite is cheaper than good fittings, and seals pretty much anything.

    I had an aluminum aftercooler that was being reinstalled on a new compressor and one of the aluminum threads galled and half of it came out on the male fitting. Put it back together with Loctite 545, no leaks. You can join BSP and NPT fittings, no problem.

    The bottles take luer syringe tips and are a must for good application (20 gage is good).

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    Used to idle the CNC lathe spindle during breaks.

    900 rpm didn’t keep the bearings warmed up...

    Played with offsets to compensate every time..



    1100 rpm did...

    the machine would cut to spec every time after coming back from breaks.

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    I would have expected X axis movements / heat in the screw to play a much greater roll than spindle temp.
    ???


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIM View Post
    Last one is small regulators on the blow gun hoses. $9 bucks at Knuckle Busters USA, line pressure is now 40psi instead of 125. Chips and coolant still get cleared but now my compressor gets to take a break where I had it running pretty much continuously.
    I don't agree with this one. 40PSI will take longer to do any job than 125PSI, and you're paying for that time. If it takes a couple seconds more to blow chips, you're maybe breaking even maybe not. If it fails to blow a chip from jaws or fixture and ruins a part, you've just lost way more than you saved.

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    The pump is still pumping to 125, but you may be using less volume.

    I have been thinking the other way around...
    I would like to have an air line with 140 for blow-off, and then I could have another line for machines @ 100. Would need to be 2 different compressors to make any sense.


    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS View Post
    Used to idle the CNC lathe spindle during breaks.

    900 rpm didn’t keep the bearings warmed up...

    Played with offsets to compensate every time..



    1100 rpm did...

    the machine would cut to spec every time after coming back from breaks.
    30 posts to get useful information...thanks JS

  16. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I would have expected X axis movements / heat in the screw to play a much greater roll than spindle temp.
    ???


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Bearing preset maybe?
    If the machine follows way scales the screw doesn't matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    I don't agree with this one. 40PSI will take longer to do any job than 125PSI, and you're paying for that time. If it takes a couple seconds more to blow chips, you're maybe breaking even maybe not. If it fails to blow a chip from jaws or fixture and ruins a part, you've just lost way more than you saved.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    The pump is still pumping to 125, but you may be using less volume.

    I have been thinking the other way around...
    I would like to have an air line with 140 for blow-off, and then I could have another line for machines @ 100. Would need to be 2 different compressors to make any sense.


    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    Yes...air is squishy, so it's better to keep squished air squished, its expensive to squish it.
    So if 40 psi at the point of use works use it.

    Unlike hot water that'leaks energy' compressed gasses can hold it.

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    Every factory in the US I have been in has air leaks (except for my shop). When I lived and worked in Japan for a year at a huge Honda auto factory in Suzuka, I can't recall ANY air leaks.

    It's a small, but telling difference between the US and Japan...

    And I for one can't stand high-pressure blow offs. I regulate mine down to 30-40 psi. For us, that's enough pressure to push any chips out of the way easily enough, and no amount of time saved blowing off parts is worth an eye.

    Yeah, yeah, most wear safety glasses, but how many wear hearing protection?? The high-pitched hissing of high-pressure blow off will eat away at your hearing over time.

    ToolCat

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  20. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Every factory in the US I have been in has air leaks (except for my shop). When I lived and worked in Japan for a year at a huge Honda auto factory in Suzuka, I can't recall ANY air leaks.

    It's a small, but telling difference between the US and Japan...

    And I for one can't stand high-pressure blow offs. I regulate mine down to 30-40 psi. For us, that's enough pressure to push any chips out of the way easily enough, and no amount of time saved blowing off parts is worth an eye.

    Yeah, yeah, most wear safety glasses, but how many wear hearing protection?? The high-pitched hissing of high-pressure blow off will eat away at your hearing over time.

    ToolCat
    We may fight about other crap...but on this we are in agreement.
    Even at home there are two pressures.
    Oh...and an air amplifier is amazing for moving material

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    What are you using for a blow gun..

    I went to these..
    Letter F. They have a long nose and 3 rows of holes.. Venturi effect or something, but
    compared to all the other nozzles I've used and own, these move a ton of air without getting
    stupid on the pressure.

    McMaster-Carr
    Edit. Linking to McM is a pain.. Blow guns, then Lever handle blowguns. Then letter F.
    PN 5369k51

    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I have been thinking the other way around...
    I would like to have an air line with 140 for blow-off, and then I could have another line for machines @ 100. Would need to be 2 different compressors to make any sense.


    ---------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    I don't agree with this one. 40PSI will take longer to do any job than 125PSI, and you're paying for that time. If it takes a couple seconds more to blow chips, you're maybe breaking even maybe not. If it fails to blow a chip from jaws or fixture and ruins a part, you've just lost way more than you saved.

    I was doubtful as to whether it would work, but had to do something as I was pushing compressor to its limits.

    First regulator I hooked up was cranked to full line pressure, then I brought it down a bit, tested, brought it down some more, then some more till action dropped off then adjusted back up till I was happy. Looked at gauge and saw 40psi.
    Bought several more, did the same and all came in at 40psi. Guys didn't notice a difference but that compressor that never seemed to stop started to shut down for a bit.
    I bought a few more regulators, installed and I can really see that compressors demand has been cut way down.

    Yes, large machines still need the higher pressure to clear off heavy chips...one or two air guns with larger orifices need more pressure..but overall much less air is being used in the shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    If you want to save some nickels, run around during the lunch break and tag all the air leaks in the shop. Fix them as you can.

    Compressed air is one of the least efficient, and most expensive, forms of energy in a machine shop. I work in a lot of shops and I usually work through lunch. When the machines are idle, the typical machine shop is filled with a continuous hissing sound.
    When I was promoted to plant manager the first day I had somebody fix 1 air leak that I had listened to for over a year.
    Two months later the lady paying the electric bill tells me it dropped from $600 a month to $300! I told her it would drop even more when I got the 3 hp compressor running instead of using the 25 hp all the time.

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