Setting up an area for punch presses
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  1. #1
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    Default Setting up an area for punch presses

    I'm asking for what kind of considerations to make, setting up for a group of punch presses. 5 units, ranging from 22 to 85 ton.
    Like which way should they face?
    How much room around them?
    Are they placed square or angled to the floor plan, like common for mills and lathes? I don't have stock feeders or uncoilers yet.
    My first intuition says to place them staggered, facing 'forward' with the smallest to the rear, as the material and output is of course smaller. This might also consume less floor space.

    obi_presses.jpg obi-presses-3.jpg

    These machines will occupy space with a fully equipped toolroom.

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    I see the Blisshttps://www.blisspressusa.com/product-category/stamping-presses/?utm_campaign=Presses&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=p pc&utm_term=%2Bbliss%20%2Bpunch%20%2Bpress&utm_con tent=2085401x719499546136511433 and Heim & Rousselle Stamping Presses - The Heim Group
    are still in business. Write or call them for these questions.

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    Depends on lots of things.

    Do your dies run left to right or right to left? Both?

    what kind of derealers do you have? how big? how fast will they operate?

    If they're on the slow side, you may to dig a pit for slack. This takes up lots of room.

    How big are your stock rolls? Do you need forklift sized maneuver room for them? or do you have an overhead crane?

    Is it a trolley style or a boom type? The boom needs floor space.

    And we won't even start with specialty floor pads pored for heavy hitters.......

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    Thanks sirs, off to a great start.
    I didn't take any dies, diesets offered were beat up in my estimation. No reels, feeders or ancillaries as yet. Can't imagine such volume that strip feeders, maybe a reel won't get it going at least. Economically speaking and considering my age I'll give them a chance to support themselves - it takes money to make money. I think forming and piercing will occur sooner than full on blanking.
    I've decided to set them askew to a wall, where floor slab and wall meet but do not actually contact. Also FAR as I can get from the jig bore! That area was not utilized well so it turned into 'oh later, storage'. Well now IS later; culling surplus & gaining square feet. This will make enough room for the riggers and their forklift. I'll leave 18" between the upright frames and the wall. The smallest will be near the inside corner, largest at the open end.
    Attachment 261472
    This makes sense, each closest to one of two doors "their" material proportionally speaking, would arrive.
    So, this is just a start. Willing to collect whatever additional opinions surface. I do wish I'd bought anti-vibe pads at least for the 85 ton air-cushion. Too big for me to raise, until I find a pair of toe-jacks.
    Nobody ever said this work was easy. It's rewarding; that's enough for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Toolmaker51 View Post
    . Also FAR as I can get from the jig bore!

    THAT was almost exactl;y what I was gunna say!

    "As far away from anything that says "SIP" on the side!"


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Make sure to leave room for your forklift to turn in with whatever size dies need to fit in the press. I know these are only small ones, but the larger ones you have will probably need to be loaded with a forklift. Goo thing to keep in mind if you get some larger presses in eventually

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    THAT was almost exactl;y what I was gunna say!

    "As far away from anything that says "SIP" on the side!"


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    A Moore Jig bore has a small foot print.

    Saw cut, excavate about 2' deep, and pour a "fully isolated slab" for the Jig bore.

    No need isolating the shop fridge et all from the shaking eh ?

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    Safety First-- are those all Full Rev Mechanicals? It seams only the 85 ton might be updated with an air clutch(but can't tell for sure without seeing the other side).

    Guarding becomes paramount..... no need to repeat here-- there is a lively thread in the commerce forum as a fellow was selling full rev presses.

    Anyway, I put my presses on isolation pads, except for less than 25 ton. Having at lease space for a cart of parts on either side if the press is a good start. You may want to have sufficient space to maneuver a ladder around the press for inspection and maintenance. For me, end forming longer items is a need and I have to allow space for that in the layout. I have angled presses for the occasional strip feed or dedicate the one on the end of the row for that purpose. You likely won't have all presses running simultaneously.

    I don't like loading presses with a forklift-- I'd invest in a couple of die carts. I like them and they are easy to use and safe.

    If you are new to stamping-- make sure folks are trained. I saw presses coming out of a neighbors shop that were crashed due to an incorrect shut height(couple months apart from each other).

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