Short/Long term future of manual/repair shops? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 26 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 518
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    808
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nopoint View Post
    Not see that up North?
    Not seeing a damn thing besides worker shortages. Companies break equipment and park it because they have a surplus of other, idle machines.

    I've seen several companies close up due to worker shortages. They can't get help, even with offering huge bonuses and benefits.

    Sent from my rotary dial flip fone

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,596
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7031
    Likes (Received)
    3909

    Default

    You can believe that a political figure head has caused problems for you if you want. I don't believe that has much weight on our current state of things.

    I don't believe times are great nor or they bad. They are in transition while the world finds a new temporary normal.

    Things are always changing. And not in ways that you, I or anyone else is going to predict.

    From my limited reading of a few different articles on the subject of supply chain problems and shortages the bottleneck seems to be places to put all the containers and how to move all the stuff. We're dealing with 20%+ more stuff than we ever have.

    I think many people are under the assumption that the ports are restricting goods and that's what I was led to believe talking with friends about it. The numbers in articles I read suggest otherwise. Ports are setting record after record for cargo coming in. The problem is consumers are buying more than the system can distribute.

    I'm so sick of hearing Trump did this or Biden is doing that. If that's what your thoughts center around please just don't type. The majority don't want to hear it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3565
    Likes (Received)
    2600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    Don't understand
    You never do and that much is very obvious.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3565
    Likes (Received)
    2600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    And here he is to make everything about Trump on queue.
    You must have missed post #15 by substandardparts, a total trump cult member, where he mentions Biden twice. You trump cult members seem to love being lied to so I thought maybe if Biden lied like trump does it would make you all feel better.

  5. Likes Bobw liked this post
  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3565
    Likes (Received)
    2600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I wonder why the ship's don't run up the coast to any number of other container ports ?

    Yes, the logistics people have the whole route planned out ahead of time, including trucks and trains to meet the containers
    at the port, but sitting for months has blown apart that schedule.

    United States container ports - Wikipedia

    Container on barge - Wikipedia
    Good point. It seems like that would be a logical way to go.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3565
    Likes (Received)
    2600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    If the linked news report is inaccurate why not provide info countering the news report? Don't understand how steel mills play into shipping issues at this time.
    Your cult god trump told the American public that there were six new steel mills being built. That was just another one of his thousands of lies. My point is that Biden is not telling us a pack of lies to make us feel better. He's trying to deal with reality as best as he can. I much prefer truth to lying no matter how much the truth hurts.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    5,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3565
    Likes (Received)
    2600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    You can believe that a political figure head has caused problems for you if you want. I don't believe that has much weight on our current state of things.

    I don't believe times are great nor or they bad. They are in transition while the world finds a new temporary normal.

    Things are always changing. And not in ways that you, I or anyone else is going to predict.

    From my limited reading of a few different articles on the subject of supply chain problems and shortages the bottleneck seems to be places to put all the containers and how to move all the stuff. We're dealing with 20%+ more stuff than we ever have.

    I think many people are under the assumption that the ports are restricting goods and that's what I was led to believe talking with friends about it. The numbers in articles I read suggest otherwise. Ports are setting record after record for cargo coming in. The problem is consumers are buying more than the system can distribute.

    I'm so sick of hearing Trump did this or Biden is doing that. If that's what your thoughts center around please just don't type. The majority don't want to hear it.
    I totally agree with you on the shipping thing and the political thing but when others start blaming Biden for the shortages I'll be here to respond to it. Post # 15 was a trump cult member spewing shit about Biden and I responded to it. That's it.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    9,755
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4688

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    And here he is to make everything about Trump on queue.
    Please spend thirty seconds to look a couple posts up then correct your message about who dragged in what.

    It's not logical that the virus would slow down port operations, btw. Ships have a very small crew, they are quarantined by themselves for several weeks on the ocean anyhow. Porttainer operators sit by themselves, truck drivers sit by themselves, stacker operators sit by themselves, minimal changes to operations would have the whole thing running fine. Maybe not 100% but close enough. Makes no sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug
    I wonder why the ship's don't run up the coast to any number of other container ports ?
    Came up by water a month ago from Seattle to the border, ships at anchor everywhere. What good does it do to drive from Los Angeles to Port Orchard to park ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood
    From my limited reading of a few different articles on the subject of supply chain problems and shortages the bottleneck seems to be places to put all the containers and how to move all the stuff. We're dealing with 20%+ more stuff than we ever have.
    Why would that be ? Curious as to the reasoning behind this ...

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    235
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    153
    Likes (Received)
    122

    Default

    What amazes me is all you clowns that haven’t figured out all politicians lie, except if you and I were politicians, then i still wouldn’t be sure about you. Lol ( my grandpa told me this while fishing on a river in northern mn) stuck with me as it is more true than not. Seems we are at a very different time than 10,20, 30 or more years ago. All this instant news ( propaganda) we have available now is a definitive cause i do believe.
    Can’t us kids all get long?


    When I find it I don’t need it
    When I need it I can’t find it!

  11. Likes DrHook liked this post
  12. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES MINOR OUTLYING ISLANDS
    Posts
    9,755
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4688

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbowerks View Post
    What amazes me is all you clowns that haven’t figured out all politicians lie,
    Sure, but .... there must be a reason that the ports are all screwed up. Politicians don't have to be involved in that, the guys at Marine Terminals know what's wrong, and the Oakland Tribune should be able to report on it. wtf is wrong here that all we get for information is garbage ?

    From both sides, standardparts. No reason to drag in President Joe Biden another thousand times.

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    140
    Likes (Received)
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    You must have missed post #15 by substandardparts, a total trump cult member, where he mentions Biden twice. You trump cult members seem to love being lied to so I thought maybe if Biden lied like trump does it would make you all feel better.
    Seek help.

  14. Likes digger doug, Winterfalke, DrHook liked this post
  15. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    140
    Likes (Received)
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Sure, but .... there must be a reason that the ports are all screwed up. Politicians don't have to be involved in that, the guys at Marine Terminals know what's wrong, and the Oakland Tribune should be able to report on it. wtf is wrong here that all we get for information is garbage ?

    From both sides, standardparts. No reason to drag in President Joe Biden another thousand times.
    It's possible that other ports are not deep enough or have labor force issues--either real or perceived on past history.

    As far as mentioning "you know who" from now on.....I'll try to work on that.

  16. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,888
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1177
    Likes (Received)
    6037

    Default

    The problem I see is that a decent repair shop is based on 3 things-
    1- Existing real estate and equipment, bought at prices 20 to 50 to maybe even 100 years ago.
    2- "institutional knowledge"- that means jigs, fixtures, experience in how to do with this machine and that brand of cutting tool, a backlog of now unavailable materials, knowledge of where to buy things they dont have at Home Depot, and, sometimes, even written down information.
    3- A guy, nowadays mostly really old guy, who is willing to work his tail off for 40 years, learning stuff about making things instead of playing golf, knowing he could make more money selling insurance or flipping trailer parks.

    The real estate, in many places, is key.
    Around me, if you didnt buy a long long time ago, you are stuck paying really high rent.

    The idea of a young person starting a shop in, say, the suburbs of Seattle, would mean dropping a minimum of a million on real estate, or paying a buck or two a month per square foot. Even then, you gotta pay for wiring and air plumbing and so on- just getting a shop is a lot of money per month.

    Used manual machines are rarer, more expensive, and more worn out than ever before, rigging is expensive- what grand dad paid 20k for, to replace today is hundreds of thousands. And if you are going to quit your day job, and start a shop, you cant take 5 years to find the right deal on a used lathe. You gotta buy a huge bunch of stuff pretty much all at once to start a shop.

    And most of all- old guys get sick, get tired, and then, die.
    And its really rare a kid wants to step into dads shop. It happens, but its rare.

    So- trying to start a manual repair shop from scratch, where I live, means ponying up a really large sum- hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars.
    To make, as my father in law would say, "bupkis".
    Better places to invest the money.

    To buy an existing shop- if its where the work is, most likely, the real estate is worth more than you could ever pay.

    Recently, near me, a much beloved hardware, tool, and fastener shop closed up- not for lack of business, but, because the kids found they could net maybe a hundred grand a year for working their buns off, or, as they did, sell the land (nobody cared about the building) for $17 million.
    Not uncommon around here.
    I have seen several fab shops, and pretty much all the used machine dealers, platers, and most of the machine shops in the Seattle area cash in for, literally, millions.

    The reason they dont make Acorn platen tables in america is the land the factory sat on was worth tens of millions, and the yearly profit from selling $8000 chunks of cast iron was maybe a hundred grand.

    This is true for the entire west coast, east coast, and pretty much any metropolitan area.

    Unless you can buy an entire old shop for way under market value, it costs way more to setup a repair machine shop than you could ever justify from the "profits".

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,596
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7031
    Likes (Received)
    3909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    The problem I see is that a decent repair shop is based on 3 things-
    1- Existing real estate and equipment, bought at prices 20 to 50 to maybe even 100 years ago.
    2- "institutional knowledge"- that means jigs, fixtures, experience in how to do with this machine and that brand of cutting tool, a backlog of now unavailable materials, knowledge of where to buy things they dont have at Home Depot, and, sometimes, even written down information.
    3- A guy, nowadays mostly really old guy, who is willing to work his tail off for 40 years, learning stuff about making things instead of playing golf, knowing he could make more money selling insurance or flipping trailer parks.

    The real estate, in many places, is key.
    Around me, if you didnt buy a long long time ago, you are stuck paying really high rent.

    The idea of a young person starting a shop in, say, the suburbs of Seattle, would mean dropping a minimum of a million on real estate, or paying a buck or two a month per square foot. Even then, you gotta pay for wiring and air plumbing and so on- just getting a shop is a lot of money per month.

    Used manual machines are rarer, more expensive, and more worn out than ever before, rigging is expensive- what grand dad paid 20k for, to replace today is hundreds of thousands. And if you are going to quit your day job, and start a shop, you cant take 5 years to find the right deal on a used lathe. You gotta buy a huge bunch of stuff pretty much all at once to start a shop.

    And most of all- old guys get sick, get tired, and then, die.
    And its really rare a kid wants to step into dads shop. It happens, but its rare.

    So- trying to start a manual repair shop from scratch, where I live, means ponying up a really large sum- hundreds and hundreds of thousands of dollars.
    To make, as my father in law would say, "bupkis".
    Better places to invest the money.

    To buy an existing shop- if its where the work is, most likely, the real estate is worth more than you could ever pay.

    Recently, near me, a much beloved hardware, tool, and fastener shop closed up- not for lack of business, but, because the kids found they could net maybe a hundred grand a year for working their buns off, or, as they did, sell the land (nobody cared about the building) for $17 million.
    Not uncommon around here.
    I have seen several fab shops, and pretty much all the used machine dealers, platers, and most of the machine shops in the Seattle area cash in for, literally, millions.

    The reason they dont make Acorn platen tables in america is the land the factory sat on was worth tens of millions, and the yearly profit from selling $8000 chunks of cast iron was maybe a hundred grand.

    This is true for the entire west coast, east coast, and pretty much any metropolitan area.

    Unless you can buy an entire old shop for way under market value, it costs way more to setup a repair machine shop than you could ever justify from the "profits".
    That makes good sense. I bought decent used machines over the past 16 years and built my shop a little bigger than what I needed for my primary CNC stuff. I've got room for a few bigger machines, a 5 ton bridge crane and can turn a semi and 53' trailer around in my driveway. My 7K sq ft building is in my back yard in a rural area. The dirt's still worth a fortune, but no more than any other place I could setup shop.

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    3,337
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3294
    Likes (Received)
    2087

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    The dirt's still worth a fortune
    There have been a few farms popping up for sale around my area, modern nice looking doublewide plus a barn, sitting on a few hundred acres of alfalfa field, 1.5 million is the lowest price I've seen. I don't know what alfalfa sells for, but suspect you'd have to grow something else to cover the mortgage.

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    5,072
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    1832

    Default

    Ive been chased by real estate prices ...left my big shop 20 years ago,then sold out my yard a year ago,now Im getting flyers in the letter box offering $5M for my house land where Ive just finished building a small 1500sq ft shop to set up what machines I havent scrapped this last year.....Everyone says the same ....for instance ,someone starting out with a truck ,trailer ,excavator needs a bit of a yard within a reasonable distance of worksites .......now with speculation gone mad ,he d be looking at 100 miles away ........Stupid low interst rates is the root cause ...speculators with free money .....making fortunes,when realistically ,they should be in bankruptcy for their risk taking.

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    5,072
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    1832

    Default

    Another result of crazy land prices ,is yuppie-fication of areas where you could have a truck,bit of a repair shop,storage yard,and all these idiots (mainly rich retired) will complain to council about a barking dog a mile away,or truck on the road at 5 am......and worse ,these yupppie idiots are legal experts and force councils to stop activities that have been operating for 100 years without problems.

  21. Likes russler, Fancuku liked this post
  22. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    5,143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4821
    Likes (Received)
    964

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    Our current president could do what our last president did and lie to us. He could just tell us that the ports are running 24/7 and the shortages are caused by the Chinese or blame someone else. Instead he relies on reality and tells us that his goal is to see ports running 24/7.

    I wonder how those six new steel mills that our last president told us about are doing.
    Why did you decide to land here B? Was it too interesting and pertinent a discussion for you that you wish to crash? Why don’t you give it a break or at least avoid messing up a good thread?

    So you may think you are a pet yet maybe you are not and so what maybe “go cry about it why don’t you” then at least you would be doing something else rather than haunting someplace again.

  23. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,892
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    140
    Likes (Received)
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Another result of crazy land prices ,is yuppie-fication of areas where you could have a truck,bit of a repair shop,storage yard,and all these idiots (mainly rich retired) will complain to council about a barking dog a mile away,or truck on the road at 5 am......and worse ,these yupppie idiots are legal experts and force councils to stop activities that have been operating for 100 years without problems.
    Here in the U.S. it's somewhat the same-- Show me an auto racing facility or maybe an airport and it seems people gravitate and build near it. In the Midwest most major cities have square miles of unused former industrial sites and if they were lucky to have the buildings demolished or burned down the land has sat idle for decades. Usually the city just about has to pay developers to build something on it. Those areas are unlikely to experience gentrification

  24. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    631
    Likes (Received)
    711

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trueturning View Post
    Why did you decide to land here B? Was it too interesting and pertinent a discussion for you that you wish to crash? Why don’t you give it a break or at least avoid messing up a good thread?

    So you may think you are a pet yet maybe you are not and so what maybe “go cry about it why don’t you” then at least you would be doing something else rather than haunting someplace again.
    You should ask yourself that same set of questions.

    Serious question: If you don't mind sharing, what is your occupation?


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •