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Thread: Starting a Shop

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokstarr999 View Post
    My understanding now is that I just need the building and a permit to operate and I'm in business. I can operate off my social at first and get the fictitious business name and tax ID set up at a later time.
    You can rent a building probably without a permit of any sort, I've never been asked for one.

    But I think your not going to get the permit of occupancy until you have done the fictitious name statement and then applied for a business licence. After which you will then get a Fire dept inspection then the occupancy permit. In theory you probably shouldn't be up and running without the occupancy certificate.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokstarr999 View Post
    I had thought about putting a manual lathe and mill in my garage and starting there. I'm not sure what size Haas I would be able to put in the garage, but even a small Haas would not be enough equipment to do work for my ex-employer. I could do some stuff though.
    All you need is some stuff. Don't concern yourself with all of the work. I'd let someone else have the manual work. it'll sink you.
    Another thing that you appear to have is leverage. If your ex employer wants you to have that work as much as you want it then perhaps they would be open to partial financing and COD.

    Another avenue that I've gone down is finding a nearby machine shop and partner with them on the work (not the business). Business owners will listen to every word you say if you are able to bring a ton of work with you. From there you take 10% commission on sales and be up front with your plan of job shopping from your garage.
    Customer gets taken care of, you have a check every payday and 10% of sales buys you that Haas.

    There is risk in this as well. But much lower that your current mindset.

    Not really sure what your opportunity consists of.

    Controversial perhaps, but gut says only offer slightly above scrap prices for ALL of the machines.

    What kind of work is it?
    How many worked in the shop? Who is making their parts right now?

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by procuring View Post
    All you need is some stuff. Don't concern yourself with all of the work. I'd let someone else have the manual work. it'll sink you.
    Another thing that you appear to have is leverage. If your ex employer wants you to have that work as much as you want it then perhaps they would be open to partial financing and COD.

    Another avenue that I've gone down is finding a nearby machine shop and partner with them on the work (not the business). Business owners will listen to every word you say if you are able to bring a ton of work with you. From there you take 10% commission on sales and be up front with your plan of job shopping from your garage.
    Customer gets taken care of, you have a check every payday and 10% of sales buys you that Haas.

    There is risk in this as well. But much lower that your current mindset.

    Not really sure what your opportunity consists of.

    Controversial perhaps, but gut says only offer slightly above scrap prices for ALL of the machines.

    What kind of work is it?
    How many worked in the shop? Who is making their parts right now?
    The opportunity would be the ability to get the equipment and get it moved at no upfront cost. Of course I'd have to start paying for it after 3 months or so, but it would be on a monthly basis. So my upfront costs would consist of everything else...secure the building, get the lights on, buy a compressor, get the machines leveled and wired up and go to work. My ex said he would supply the material initially until I could start procuring my own. The huge downside is the condition of the CNC equipment. That's what the 20k is for...just in case. Securing a building is a little more challenging than it was made out to be, but I have an agent looking for a space. Getting a landlord to agree to a lease with a startup is also a challenge from what I hear.

    Mostly one off work, very small QTY's. Parts are currently sourced locally.

  4. #84
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    Leasing a commercial/industrial suite around here:
    1) You need to be in business already (DBA or LLC minimum).
    2) You will need liability ins. before you get the keys. (this is the main reason for #1)
    3) And, you will need first/last/security $$$.

    The insurance is the biggest wrench in the works. But, you wont get in a commercial property without it. Prepare for some sticker shock when you see the policy.
    Especially if you are looking at industrial plaza type spaces. They (the property manager) will tell you what coverage you need. You take that to the insurance company.
    Ins. company will write the policy the way the property manager dictates. You pay, a lot.

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  6. #85
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    Be very leery of partners. I was all in line to resign and go in with an acquaintance who has a better business brain than me. Timing was critical. All of a sudden he stopped answering calls and when I saw him at work the business was not the topic. A month past the first milestone I asked him for some info. I offered to take a photo - he gave it to me - ' I will never need it' he said! The website developer quoted us 'about $5k.' A year later it turns out my friend is very ill - he looks like he escaped from Auschwitz. I told the developer-man and asked about the cost of the website - now $1500 - a number I could have afforded on my own. Providence or bad luck? I don't know.

    If the machines are that old would they not sell them at scrap value to the former 'worthy employee.'

  7. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by gwelo62 View Post
    Be very leery of partners. .....website developer quoted us 'about $5k.' A year later .... asked about the cost of the website - now $1500 - a number I could have afforded on my own. Providence or bad luck? I don't know.

    If it only costed you $3500 for that valuable lesson then I'm jealous and you made out like a bandit!!!
    Congrats.



    If the machines are that old would they not sell them at scrap value to the former 'worthy employee.'
    Correct!!!!! My offer would have been only slightly more than scrap pricing. And you'd still be doing them a huge favor.

  8. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by gwelo62 View Post
    ....very ill - he looks like he escaped from Auschwitz.

    THAT IS JUST INSENSITIVE!!!!!!

    My grandfather was burned at Auschwitz!!!!


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