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    Maybe not the stupidest thing to hear but the thing I dislike most is "We've always done it like that here".

    Translation - "Don't tell me how to do something. I'll do what I've always done".

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    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Ten thousandths of an inch is a thou dived by ten (tenths) if you can understand others in this world.
    Weird that you would consider this statement bad in a interview or not pursue an explanation.
    Do you have a hard time finding "good, class "A" people?
    Bob
    I may be wrong but,every person in the machine trade I know considers ten thousandths of an inch to be .010 in. A thousandths divided by 10 would be 1 ten thousandths or .0001 in. or as we in the moldmaking world refer to it, tenths. The guys statement was that he could routinely work within ten thousandths (.010), not tenths of a thousandth. And yes ,we have trouble finding good people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"
    Your head of inspection is using a $15 calipers and your cheapass can't buy him an $85 set of mits to replace them with? I would ask for a raise too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"
    Either you pay low or you have no idea what's happening in the shop. Why should your head of inspection have to use his own caliper? Do you expect your machinists to have their own machines?

    OTOH maybe your reply was the stupidest thing an employer ever said to an employee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AARONT View Post
    Your head of inspection is using a $15 calipers and your cheapass can't buy him an $85 set of mits to replace them with? I would ask for a raise too.
    They probably all sing this song at work.

    Tennessee Ernie Ford Sings 16 Tons - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"
    Quote Originally Posted by AARONT View Post
    Your head of inspection is using a $15 calipers and your cheapass can't buy him an $85 set of mits to replace them with? I would ask for a raise too.
    Any of the half dozen places I worked for the man no one that worked in inspection used personal tools and no tool designated for the inspection room or department ever left there. That was to make sure the instruments were of the highest quality, professionally calibrated and stayed that way. Machinists had to provide their own basic inspection tools, the inspectors did not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swamp dweller View Post
    I may be wrong but,every person in the machine trade I know considers ten thousandths of an inch to be .010 in.
    That is slightly ambiguous; "a ten thousandths" of an inch is clearly (to me anyway) .0001", buy yeah, "ten thousandths" is ten thou., .010". Obviously In the vernacular its solved by referring to thous and tenths, but it could produce confusion

    The French don't get that many victories, but I have to grudgingly grant them and their metric system one here
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-13-2018 at 04:28 PM.

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    we do have a high end set of tools for the inspection area that don't leave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swamp dweller View Post
    I may be wrong but,every person in the machine trade I know considers ten thousandths of an inch to be .010 in. A thousandths divided by 10 would be 1 ten thousandths or .0001 in. or as we in the moldmaking world refer to it, tenths. The guys statement was that he could routinely work within ten thousandths (.010), not tenths of a thousandth. And yes ,we have trouble finding good people.
    It's ambiguous. We all know machinist lingo, but machinist lingo is technically not correct. I deal with engineers, medical professionals, etc. who are not machinists, and need to choose language which is not ambiguous. "Five ten-thousandths of an inch" is clearly .0005" in correct mathematical language. "Five tenths" is technically .5", though we all know we mean .0005". The speaker has the responsibility to know the listener and use unambiguous language that the listener will understand, and the listener has the responsibility to ask for clarification when ambiguity is detected.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"
    You don't supply certified & periodically checked tools to the inspection department but expect the inspector to supply his own?

    Please post your company so everyone who actually wants assurance of quality work can avoid you.

    PDW

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    Me to our head of inspection "hey can I borrow your caliper?"
    Them "sure" proceeds to hand me a taped up $15 hardware store caliper
    Me "is this what you check parts with everyday?"
    Them "Yes"
    Me "get a catalog and pick out a good caliper, then decide how many weeks you want it taken out of your check (usually 4-6) and let me know"
    Them "well are you going to add a raise into my check so I can get one?"
    Wow, there's a whole pile of stupid here, but not coming from the inspector.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DyanamicEDM View Post
    we do have a high end set of tools for the inspection area that don't leave.
    If there are new and used inspection gauges then production should have newer gauges than inspection. If you can't figure out why you have a problem.

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    A bit OT again. I was working on the gear box of a Lucas HBM. Sitting on the floor in the back side just under the spindle head. My helper who happened to be Polish...lol...was under there with me and I said run get me a 3/4" long socket. He stood up fast and bang hit his head on the spindle support. Then he came back with the socket. About 10 minutes later I said get a 9/16" socket (could have been a pliers, it was 30 years ago..lol) and up he went and bang, bumped his head again...he and I had a BIG laugh...he didn't get hurt as he had a REAL HARD Head...lol The next day at the shop at lunch I gave him a present. A Hard Hat.. We laughed about that for years....lol... Never bumped his head again.....or at least when we was working for me...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    It's ambiguous. We all know machinist lingo, but machinist lingo is technically not correct. I deal with engineers, medical professionals, etc. who are not machinists, and need to choose language which is not ambiguous. "Five ten-thousandths of an inch" is clearly .0005" in correct mathematical language. "Five tenths" is technically .5", though we all know we mean .0005". The speaker has the responsibility to know the listener and use unambiguous language that the listener will understand, and the listener has the responsibility to ask for clarification when ambiguity is detected.
    Every Machinist knows five tenths is .0005. The fact we are in fact dealing in inches and not metric then you know the context as you say of a inch. That is ok we can handle more detail in this to suit your complaint like we always do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    It's ambiguous. We all know machinist lingo, but machinist lingo is technically not correct. I deal with engineers, medical professionals, etc. who are not machinists, and need to choose language which is not ambiguous. "Five ten-thousandths of an inch" is clearly .0005" in correct mathematical language. "Five tenths" is technically .5", though we all know we mean .0005". The speaker has the responsibility to know the listener and use unambiguous language that the listener will understand, and the listener has the responsibility to ask for clarification when ambiguity is detected.
    I'm trying to remember what I said back in Scotland when I still worked in inches. Not 100% sure but I think for 0.0005" I'd have said "half a thou".

    Not the same with metric as "a thou" is not only small compared to an inch "thou" but referred to as µ. Not sure how to write the pronunciation as a word Mu?

    If asked how much a µ is most will say "a thousandth of a mm" but in fact it is one millionth om a meter. Same of course but it depends on how technically correct (or pedantic) a person wishes to be.

    "The lowercase Greek letter mu (µ) is used to represent the prefix multiplier 0.000001 (10 -6 or one millionth). For example, 0.000000001 farad or 10 -9 F of capacitance is commonly written as 0.001 µF. ... In some texts, the symbol µ is an abbreviation of micrometer(s) or micron(s)."

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    Wow, Glad I don't have to pt up with that imperial cr*p!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Not the same with metric as "a thou" is not only small compared to an inch "thou" but referred to as µ. Not sure how to write the pronunciation as a word Mu?
    "Micro"... followed by Nano and Pico. Applicable to all standard units across the world except the US, Liberia and Myanmar.

    Definitions of the SI units: The twenty SI prefixes

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    Quote Originally Posted by MihiT View Post
    Wow, Glad I don't have to put up with that imperial cr*p!
    OTOH there is 100c in $1

    "In many national currencies, the cent, commonly represented by the cent sign is a monetary unit that equals ​¹⁄₁₀₀ of the basic monetary unit. Etymologically, the word cent derives from the Latin word "centum" meaning hundred."

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    This is all so confusing and not limited to imperial.
    Often I hear in a very big metric shop something like "It's out by 80 mils" where my immediate thought is.. What..??..not possible.
    The meaning was microns but "mils" is the term everyone uses and there is no way to fix this.
    Why can't they just say microns and who taught them this speak? Yet it is endemic and part of the culture.
    Not sure what they think when going to the big box store and buying 15 mil plastic rolls

    .0005 imperial is easy at "half a thou" but is .0003 a "third of a thou", "three-tenths", " point 3", "300 millionths" (wait the whole mil thing again).

    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    If there are new and used inspection gauges then production should have newer gauges than inspection. If you can't figure out why you have a problem.
    I take it you haven't been in a lot of shops. If you had you would not make such as statement. The inspection department checks the parts after the machinist made them, they are the last quality check before the customer receives them, they should always have the best inspection tools. Have you ever seen what happens to the boxes of gauge pins out on the shop floor? They disappear faster than a box of candy at an over eaters anonymous meeting. There also are a lot of areas in the shop that are hazardous to inspection equipment and taking the time to inspect what you are doing while cleaning up to keep the inspection tools pristine can be a waste of time. I have inspection tools that are dedicated to hazardous duty and I am aware of their limitations.

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