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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post

    She needs a new job...
    My wife was planning to be a teacher. She got to the point in her education where she got to play teacher in a classroom and said the hell with that and put her credits towards a bachelors in psychology instead. She makes high forties with great benefits and a nice schedule. She likes what she does and there's a lot of opportunity for moving up if she decides to go for her masters.

    She trains adults with mental health issues to hold down a job and get to the lowest level of assistance they can. In some ways it's probably a lot like teaching kids.
    Last edited by Garwood; 03-03-2018 at 09:30 AM.

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  3. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    That's why they hire scabs, change laws and (have) murdered people.
    And Jimmy Hoffa was a pleasant family man...

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  5. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    I agree with what you say about the unions, what I asked about is whether the company is legally obligated to give the same package to non-union members. I could not find anything definitive about this.

    Another question is, say a company has a large work force but they are divided by skill sets. One are machinists and the second sheet metal. The machinist's have 70 members, the sheet metal 30. The machinist's vote for a union, the sheet metal not. What conditions must the employer satisfy and what conditions must the unions?

    Tom
    I'll try to find that section of labor law...it's been a while since I sat through that class.
    But within a 'bargaining unit' the company has to pay the same, union member or not.
    The facility or company votes to unionize, not the individual trade.
    once the shop is union then individual trades can split off IIRC.
    Also, the amount of external labor for things like electricians then comes under scrutiny.

  6. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    And Jimmy Hoffa was a pleasant family man...
    He was a dick.
    Capitol on the other hand has a mandatory economic reason for acting that way.
    If a nice guy comes I. He will be run out of business by the not so nice guy.

  7. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    Capitol on the other hand has a mandatory economic reason for acting that way.
    Unions have the same incentive. Ask any non union tradesman...

  8. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    And Jimmy Hoffa was a pleasant family man...
    I'll take Jimmy over Lloyd, Jamie, the Rockefellers or JP Morgan any day ... but this is kinda cool :

    How Frank Sheeran killed Jimmy Hoffa

    Be honest now ... who would you want to have your back, Jimmy or Wall Street ?

    The Mafia is more trustworthy than our financiers.

  9. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    LOL. My wife has 16+ year old kids that can't read.

    It's called "social promotion". Basically, if you reach a certain age, you move up to another grade regardless of what you actually know.
    This is a core problem, education and how hard kids apply themselves. Talk to people who grew up in the Chinese system, want to be a success? 7 days a week and tutors into the evening. Another anecdote, friend of mine grew here but is of Chinese heritage. She's an anesthesiologist - her 4 siblings are all doctors or lawyers. Once in grade school she came home with a mark less than an A; the consequence was no TV for a year!

    I don't even know how you fix it; I didn't want to raise my kinds as slaves. However its the reality of what we are competing against - for jobs, for spots in universities, for everything. Think we're just competing against low cost labour? Give your head a huge shake; we're competing with a well educated talent that works extremely hard. Maybe we don't want that extreme, but this coddling and letting incompetence and laziness just carry on through (whether in school or work) guarantees you're not going to be great again (whatever that means).

    I suppose the winners still win, they take it upon themselves to get into medical school or whatever.... but what about the rest? Good intelligent kids who like most of them aren't super academically motivated at a young age? The Chinese force them to work for academic performance - they overcome the natural state of childhood by discipline. We otoh, by passing them, we fail them. Instead of cracking the whip and getting these kids in gear we're instead enabling the lazy behaviour by just letting it all cruise through like it doesn't matter.

    I gave my four kids great childhoods, I wouldn't have wanted them to academic slaves (and they are all doing well)....but otoh how can what we are societally doing now, social promotion, no discipline etc give us any chance of not just slipping further given what the competition is doing? We're all business guys here, we know what happens when the competition starts getting ahead

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  11. #108
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    Being a good intelligent kid does not mean you automatically have the academic smarts/intelligence even when you try very hard Similarly it doesn't mean you are going to become extremely wealthy/successful in life just because you do well academically.

    Go to any school and you will find extremely hard working students from all backgrounds just as you will find ones that don't. The extremes stand out. While it is nice to think that hard work alone will get you anywhere you want to in life reality is very different for most.

    There are so many reasons why kids may not do as well as we think they should. Failing kids/no social promotion simply doesn't work for the vast majority, by the time they graduate they aren't any better academically. I am old enough to remember classmates 2 years older than me in elementary, they didn't make it to senior high. Older classmates who didn't make it to high school could go out and get a good paying job, not so much anymore.

    The other issue is why are we penalizing kids because they are poor, don't have the greatest parents or were born with weaker cognitive skills for academics. The issue is not social promotion, it is a lack of programs (that we used to have in schools) where kids who couldn't read or write or do math very well could still learn basic academics, shine in electives and get a good job.

    Dave

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  13. #109
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    One of the biggest problems of Seattle public schools is not having the resources to deal with kids who learn at different rates. Private schools are much better equipped to deal with kids needing special attention in certain areas like math or reading.

    City wide Seattle is currently running about 29% of school agers enrolled in private schools. That's a damn high percentage considering the costs of private education. In my immediate neighborhood a quick count tells me that percentage may be low.

    The PTA at the public school my grand son attends "strongly" suggests parents donate $600 per each of their children to supplement state funding for special needs. That PTA activism has made the school one the city's most sought after elementaries.

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    Either there was a lot of equipment duplication across the two companies, or whoever last walked away from those machines ain't expected back...

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  17. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Either there was a lot of equipment duplication across the two companies, or whoever last walked away from those machines ain't expected back...
    Easy enough for the new company to "No Quote" allot of work.

  18. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    One of the biggest problems of Seattle public schools is not having the resources to deal with kids who learn at different rates. Private schools are much better equipped to deal with kids needing special attention in certain areas like math or reading.

    City wide Seattle is currently running about 29% of school agers enrolled in private schools. That's a damn high percentage considering the costs of private education. In my immediate neighborhood a quick count tells me that percentage may be low.

    The PTA at the public school my grand son attends "strongly" suggests parents donate $600 per each of their children to supplement state funding for special needs. That PTA activism has made the school one the city's most sought after elementaries.
    Both my daughter and son went to private schools here. The teaching standard tends to be better plus, unlike public schools, "annoying" pupils can be kicked out.

    About Private Schools in Denmark - Ministry of Education

    As they receive a substantial government grant they are surprisingly inexpensive.

    How to Choose a School in Denmark via How to Live in Denmark

    School and Education | Workindenmark

  19. #114
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    Looks to me like they're getting rid of a lot of old junk that doesn't earn its square footage of floor space.

    That NILES seems to be the only thing on there from this century and with little more than 3k/hrs in 10yrs, doesn't sound like they needed it all that much in the first place.

  20. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by SND View Post
    Looks to me like they're getting rid of a lot of old junk that doesn't earn its square footage of floor space
    It does, doesn't it? A subtle indication of the overhead connected with the operation is the individualized areas of cutters, workholding, etc. surrounding some of those machines—as though they had become the exclusive domain of whoever the operator was. Not much chance that knowledge was going to be passed on...

  21. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    One of the biggest problems of Seattle public schools is not having the resources to deal with kids who learn at different rates. Private schools are much better equipped to deal with kids needing special attention in certain areas like math or reading.

    City wide Seattle is currently running about 29% of school agers enrolled in private schools. That's a damn high percentage considering the costs of private education. In my immediate neighborhood a quick count tells me that percentage may be low.

    The PTA at the public school my grand son attends "strongly" suggests parents donate $600 per each of their children to supplement state funding for special needs. That PTA activism has made the school one the city's most sought after elementaries.
    It a nice story...but not how it works.
    Typically the private and charter schools decline to serve the hard pupils, leaving them out of the system, while money is siphoned out of the public sector and stranding those kids.

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  23. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    I'll try to find that section of labor law...it's been a while since I sat through that class.
    But within a 'bargaining unit' the company has to pay the same, union member or not.
    The facility or company votes to unionize, not the individual trade.
    once the shop is union then individual trades can split off IIRC.
    Also, the amount of external labor for things like electricians then comes under scrutiny.
    Trades certainly can be a bargaining unit. I am a Union millwright and I am commonly on jobs with carpenters, pipefitters, boilermakers, operating engineers, electricians, and laborers, all working for the same company. All working under different contracts.


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