When to hire, currently sole proprietor - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1517
    Likes (Received)
    1726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hillside Fab View Post
    Fair enough, I thought there would be some out there that were tired of corporate BS, and still wanted a reason to get out of the house. Maybe I will have time to address that more next year, but I'm not planning on competing with a Boeing shop climate.

    On edit, I'm not talking about a skilled machinist anymore, and the shop definitely beats outside construction type work on the climate control front.
    Not sure about your weather, but down here ac is a MUST HAVE PERIOD. I worked in northern IN most of my life, and with the exception of a few really hot summers where it was 90+ for a couple weeks on end, you could offer guys to work early in the AM, or work half days when it is really really hot. Same goes for heat in the winter. I have read on here about some guys not heating their workspace for whatever reason. I worked one job where our heat was pretty bad and during the winter you spend the first half of Monday with a coat on, or a padded flannel jacket. NOT FUN!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1517
    Likes (Received)
    1726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by as9100d View Post
    cash is ALWAYS kind. I start at $15 an hour for every position, thats my lowest paid employee, all the way up to 6x figure salary positions and I feel I overpay what the market pays for every single position. Button pushers $20-30 depending on setup capability. Programmers $35-40 depending on how efficient add to that a profit sharing plan.
    Ok, forgive my prejudice here but I don't see AR being a very high cost of living area, maybe I am wrong depending on where?? Anyhow, how can you afford to pay 20-30$/hr for an operator? I don't know you, you don't know me, but it sounds EXACTLY like the jobs listed as something like "22-32$ hour for the right experience!" but somehow that "right experience" never seems to find it's way to your door...

    Just curious, not meaning to derail thread, but it's like there are two extremes to the skilled wages and people and pay....

    1) Guys claiming they pay VERY well and they know they need to (insert reasoning here)
    2) The business types saying to pay a guy $20/hr means they need to make the company $100/hr (or whatever) because of overhead and taxes and health ins and on and on...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    173
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    100
    Likes (Received)
    93

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Not sure about your weather, but down here ac is a MUST HAVE PERIOD. I worked in northern IN most of my life, and with the exception of a few really hot summers where it was 90+ for a couple weeks on end, you could offer guys to work early in the AM, or work half days when it is really really hot. Same goes for heat in the winter. I have read on here about some guys not heating their workspace for whatever reason. I worked one job where our heat was pretty bad and during the winter you spend the first half of Monday with a coat on, or a padded flannel jacket. NOT FUN!
    It's just me in here now, and I'm kind of a lightweight, so I do try to do all these things.

    It has been 90+ all summer, and it sucks. I bought an unused take off rooftop AC unit on CL, and need to get it installed, but I dont expect it to do much better than 80 degrees in the summer next yr. I just hope it knocks down the humidity. I suppose I need to look into air exchangers also because when it gets smoky now, I just open a door and the AC wont be able to recover.

    I will be upgrading the heat to keep it above 60 this winter. It got down in the 40s last winter, and I dont like cold fingers either.

    I think most soccer moms would still not approve of the conditions though.

  4. Likes Mike1974 liked this post
  5. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Staten Island NewYork USA
    Posts
    3,721
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1082
    Likes (Received)
    1778

    Default

    Figure out what your looking for and see what kind of help is available.

    I have production guys, CNC lathe and CNC mill people. Used to try and keep a manual person on...but that was too hit and miss so just opted to stay away from service and manual stuff.

    Early on I could only afford one person and looked for a "ME". Someone who could pretty much do it all. That would have been great...but I already had a job and not available. So then I always seemed to fall short with new hires. Or put someone on who could do a little turnign and milling, just not great at either. Then somewhere I realized find someone who can Mill OR turn and I'll do the other. That kinda worked pretty good...they knew one thing pretty well and it was just some learn our shop, learn our ways and we moved forward. Then when enough work came in steady enough I looked for someone to do turning.

    Hand as in production I found I can teach fairly quick to anyone eager to work and learn a bit...

    Also retired people who want to get out of the house can be a nice fit. Not fast...not slow..but steady and not looking to change the world...thats important. Some eager beavers want to come in and make a mark for themselves.

  6. Likes Hillside Fab, Bobw liked this post
  7. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    11,714
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    8973

    Default

    You're a smart guy, so I'm sure this will not be an issue when you decide to move forward.

    My thought on the subject is sort of inline with the other guys. I think the normal reaction is to think you need to hire someone just like yourself who is just as good as you so he can do the same work as you to the same level.

    Personally, I think you are better off to find someone who is opposite of you and who is good at things you are no so good at. Like for me, I'm terrible at repetitive tasks. I zone out and mess things up. I'm also not good at things like making sure shipments are ready to go out at the right time or remembering to pay the bills in a timely fashion. But, I can do the complex technical stuff that needs to get done.

    I'd be well served to find someone to handle those things I'm not good at and just get that completely off my plate. I think roughly the same would be true for other. No one is good at everything.

    The other thing you might want to consider is hiring two people. Or at least having a plan to hire someone else within a year. In my opinion it's difficult to manage the one owner/one employee dynamic for a long period of time. Especially if you guys are working together in a small space every day. The line between employee and friend is inevitably blurred, and that puts a real strain on things. A guy kind of needs to be able to come to work and have a chum he can relate to who is not also his boss.

    But, that's just my opinion. I did have an employee once and it worked out OK. He eventually moved on and we are still friends, so I don't think you can be mad about that.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •