The worst drawings I have ever seen - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straightedge View Post
    I'm not sharing their drawings: these belong to my company! We contracted with the university and paid up front to have them design a small system, including a pressure vessel (not shown) that complies with the ASME code.
    Okay I see then, my apologies.

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    Coming from the construction world, those drawings are not bad at all. Clear on what to do, and what needs to be changed to work for the shop (thickness of blade to 5/16 min, at least the lower section). The revised drawing takes precedence over first drawing, which sounds simple enough - until you try and mesh the two. Take the first drawing and throw it out if you have too, do not let whoever needs to make the part even see round one.
    Just wait for the automated drawings - which are now becoming standard in construction (Tekla, sds, rivitt), which you will love, dimensions taken off the minor diameter of bolt 3' away to start a stair and rail, then running dimensions from light bulbs to random points to math from. I am doing a hotel with 2 stair towers (16 stories, 32 flights), all running dimensions are from the lobby desk (I think, they kind of merge to that as work point +- 4') for rails, and literally the minor diameter of a bolt on the first stair. The dxf are to paper space scale, and truncated without marks to look pretty on paper. These all meet aisc specs because automated!

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by memphisjed View Post
    Coming from the construction world, those drawings are not bad at all.
    It sounds like we've been spoiled rotten working with competent subcontractors all these years and had no idea what others are dealing with. Anybody making drawings like these would have flunked the first-year ME drafting class when I was in school. I'd love to know wtf is going on that you can get a PhD and know less than a freshman.

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  6. #24
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    Mmmm, love me some bad drafting! It’s like watching a train wreck, but you get to enjoy it longer.
    The guy probably handed this project off to some poor student who didn’t even know what class he signed up for. “Don’t worry about those mistakes, just slap a note on there and ship it out.”

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  8. #25
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    We always put BTF on our drawings. (beat to fit)

  9. #26
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    I just love the dimensions to radii tangencies. I thought all engineers had to take drafting?

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  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rewt View Post
    I just love the dimensions to radii tangencies. I thought all engineers had to take drafting?
    Not only that but look at all the double dimensioning. No wonder he had to use three place decimals on angles to avoid rounding errors.........

    Quote Originally Posted by memphisjed View Post

    Coming from the construction world, those drawings are not bad at all. ?
    Wow, glad I'm not a construction contractor.......

  12. #28
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    Wow, glad I'm not a construction contractor.......
    In my younger years did a lot of building, errors in the drawings were many.
    One in particular that sticks in my mind, two story house plans drawn by pro architect.
    Approved by building department, permit issued etc... numerous people had looked at these drawings.
    Stairs as drawn were to start about 4' inside the front door up to a landing then turn 90 deg up to second floor
    Problem was built as dimensioned on drawing bottom of stairs would be outside the front door.
    Architect tried to blame us saying we made a mistake framing the stair opening, they had sold many of these same plans nobody else had any problems.
    Big battle over that one, but they finally admitted their mistake.
    Major job to correct things.

    Ed

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  14. #29
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    Unless I'm completely mistaken, the 1/4-20 threads into the edge of the 3/16 plate isn't necessarily a problem if this is machined after welding. The tapped holes appear to be for magnets. They are drilled 4xD deep, which is a bit on the deep side, but it's into a weldment. The 1/4" of hole that projects into the plate isn't going to be holding the thread. Yes, you drilled away a tiny bit of your weld, but that' not necessarily a big deal. I've had some similar parts, though I drew them much better, where our tapped hole projected through the bottom plate of a T-joint and drilled into the weld a little bit.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielG View Post
    Unless I'm completely mistaken, the 1/4-20 threads into the edge of the 3/16 plate isn't necessarily a problem if this is machined after welding. The tapped holes appear to be for magnets. They are drilled 4xD deep, which is a bit on the deep side, but it's into a weldment. The 1/4" of hole that projects into the plate isn't going to be holding the thread. Yes, you drilled away a tiny bit of your weld, but that' not necessarily a big deal. I've had some similar parts, though I drew them much better, where our tapped hole projected through the bottom plate of a T-joint and drilled into the weld a little bit.
    Putting these drawings up is mostly for entertainment purposes. Yeah, we could all give them a pass, make some excuses, say that they didn't know this or that, but at the end of the day, these drawings look like they're made by someone who doesn't give a rat's ass about design or have the slightest curiosity to learn. They sure talked a good game. Fake it till you make it, right?

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  17. #31
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    I wish I had some of the drawings I made when I designed and manufactured my own products. A lot of them were mounting plates to add an extra alternator or AC compressor to a limousine. We would start with a cardboard cut out as a mock up for the first prototype I machined. I would actually scan the piece of cardboard and then hand draw dimensions on it, crossing them out as I changed them. That was on the flat parts only. I made respectable low budget drawings for the round parts run on my lathes.

    Fortunately I did all the set-ups on the mill parts and they had wide open tolerances so the operators did not need to reference my drawings. Hit the green button and check the holes with plug gauges and bolts once in a while. Also make sure the contour checks by eye against the sample part.

    Too bad I tossed them all, it was a right of passage when the recession sunk that business. I could have won the worst drawing contest in a run away.

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  19. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I could have won the worst drawing contest in a run away.
    Crayola's and all thumbs eh ?

    That's why we are called "cartoonist's"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Straightedge View Post
    It sounds like we've been spoiled rotten working with competent subcontractors all these years and had no idea what others are dealing with. Anybody making drawings like these would have flunked the first-year ME drafting class when I was in school. I'd love to know wtf is going on that you can get a PhD and know less than a freshman.
    I've worked with a fair number of people who have PhD credentials, and what that has taught me is they only know a lot about one little thing. Aside from that, they're normal college graduates.

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  22. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Crayola's and all thumbs eh ?

    That's why we are called "cartoonist's"
    Sharpies and ball point pens.

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    It seems the person was not well educated re drawing practices. Would my guess be correct that they are from another country, perhaps one a few decades back in terms of technical knowledge?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    It seems the person was not well educated re drawing practices. Would my guess be correct that they are from another country, perhaps one a few decades back in terms of technical knowledge?
    While the last name suggests Italian descent, he talks like he was born and bred in the USA. The PhD came from the University of Central Florida, so you can draw your own conclusions about what decade they're working in. Based on the beautiful work that guys used to crank out on drafting boards 50, 100, and 150 years ago with very limited computational power at their disposal, I have a feeling that this work might be a glimpse of the future, not the past.

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  26. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straightedge View Post
    Based on the beautiful work that guys used to crank out on drafting boards 50, 100, and 150 years ago
    What do you mean 50+ years ago.. I have a customer that still has 3 drafting tables, and HE USES THEM!!

    Not very often, but occasionally. Most of the time its a sketch on some yellow notebook paper.

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    First and only drawing I made was a simple piece of rectangular cross section ductwork. Our shop added some plate triangles to close the holes at the compound miter.
    3D eliminates a lot of stupid stuff, but one still has to know how to dimension so the shop can make it and the inspector can check it. To do that, one has to know how to build things.

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  29. #39
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    What about the material on the first print? Weldable 7xxx aluminum? That doesn't look like a candidate for friction stir welding to me. Or grade 9 Tiatnium (spelling copied from drawing).

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  31. #40
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    These drawings look like a lot of stuff I used to see when I worked as a university research machinist (the official title, but functionally much broader), and like some stuff I see now as a prototype shop. One of my clients said to me that he was interested in designing the important product features, not worrying about repetitive details. I can see that as an approach, and you just have to decide that it's what you have to work with. You charge a little more for the extra "service", such as it is. OTOH, if you are paying someone for design engineering and documentation (in advance, at that) of this quality, you definitely have several bones to pick.


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