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  1. #21
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    To the original title,
    NO and in caps.
    Bob

  2. #22
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    I've shown potential customers samples of the work we did in my shop. Pretty much a similar situation with a guy bringing samples of his work to show me.

    As others have said, I would expect him to have detailed knowledge of the machining processes.

    Actually I've never hired an experienced machinist. I've hired guys who obviously had the aptitude to learn though.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jobshopblog.com View Post
    They probably don't have the right to bring them since they should have been properly tagged and dispositioned in the shop if they were defective or put into inventory if they were good, but the comments about the interviewer are spot on. I've done a lot of interviews and never had anyone bring parts they made. If they did, they'd better be ready to speak about them in great detail (including what the shop policy was for handling and disposition of defective material).
    Ehhh, I don't agree. I have brought a bag full of parts to every interview but they were my own parts I designed and made. If an interviewer assumed they were stolen parts and passed on my due to that - their loss. But you raise an interesting point - you *should* ask how they have the parts and they should easily be able to give a rational and qualified explanation.

  5. #24
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    I have had people show me parts they have made, projects they were involved with, machines they worked on along with beautiful resumes and letters of recommendation. I have also had spouses come in to translate for them, friends to vouch for their abilities.

    I love machine work, parts and projects as much as I enjoy seeing machinery and talking with their friends and family.
    A great resume can be a pleasure to read.
    A letter of recommendation is great, nice to hear good things from others

    So I say bring it all in, I'm interested for sure.


    Now do I rest much on what I see and hear...unfortunately not. Well, maybe I spoke too soon. Show me a part and can't tell me how it was made my BS meter is online and running.

    In truth, I want to hear what your capable of. Some experience background...I'll ask a couple questions related to the approach you would take on a job or part...some idea of speeds and feeds, they would use. We'll talk about wages, whats expected and then I want to put them on the floor to make a part or part of a part. Not free, but at the wage they request...and we really talk after.

    Sorry...truth is I have had people come through my door with such great BS stories, they had me believing I was going to be taking notes from them when they got started.
    Such high hopes till they got started and MY MACHINES were not right, THEY didn't hold sizes or they couldn't get the reamer to cut right...as it was running backwards. I've had guys show up with their tools...a PLASTIC caliper in their back pocket. Guys walk over to the lathe when we discussed Bridgeport. "Certified" TIG welders ask me why the wire is not feeding out of the TIG torch. CNC machinists skip the parallel in the vise approach and eyeball the part. Had them ask what the G-Code was for drilling..or grab a 3/8" endmill to face the top of a part when the facemill was sitting right there. I've had them ask me how to pickup the edge of a part, not understand why the HSS drill should not glow red...

    So, yeah I'm interested...but seeing the skill set on the floor is what I need and what interests me when hiring.



    I have only received one letter of recommendation from a gent that owned an Areo-Space Machine shop. This kid standing in front on me was his prodigy, running the place till he retired. According to that letter there was no task he could not tackle, ran all manuals and CNC's.
    Later I found out...that the guy was actually senile and took a liking to this kid. They toyed around in the back of the shop till the family closed the place up.
    I figured it out right after I had the kid run his first job for me. Instead of using offsets to bring the endmill into the mean, he just re-ran the program. ON all the parts, so while that did kinda brought the sizes into the mean...he didn't know you can't run a Form Tap Drill twice. Yup, he took good parts a hair over the mean and well in tolerance and reran them bring sizes right on...but drilling out the formed threads ruining the parts. Maybe an honest mistake...aside from the lack of offset knowledge. It went downhill from there...
    Family from areospace place called me back a week or two later as I left a message when calling to verify his resume. They were just finishing up emptying the space. In short, their opinion was he was a first rate BS artist and apologized for their fathers letter.

    ...and then I've had people come in that could not speak the language. Offered a resume by way of a spouse who translated a little. Give him something to make and he'll show you tooling he would use and program the machine. In no time flat he had great tooling picked out and a GOOD program written along with a job at his asking salary.

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  7. #25
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    Maybe the reverse of what OP asked, but I have been asked how to make a part being shown a print. I interviewed at a place that asked me if I could square a sawcut only (no 2 surfaces parallel) block in a Bridgeport, then he asked me to explain the process which I did. (I didn't take the job, however I was offered it)

    I interviewed at another place that showed me a print and I explained how I would setup, what sort of tools, etc. They said thank you and never called back. I know* I could have made that part the way I described. I don't know if they were expecting something else or a BS artist interviewed after me or what....

    * I get all shops are different, so maybe I missed a step they would have done or...?

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post

    * I get all shops are different, so maybe I missed a step they would have done or...?

    If they expect you to run a part the same as they do...they want robot.


    Just like there are several ways to skin a cat..there are multiple ways to make a good part in a good amount of time and not break a bunch of tooling in the process.


    When I ask a person to explain how they would tackle a job...what I want to hear more then anything is the thought process with some idea of tooling they would like to use.

    It can be very telling even on simple jobs..like holding on saw cut surfaces instead of stock, tight location .500 +/-.002 holes are "just drilled" no spotting, no interpolation, no reaming just a 1/2" drill

    ...and even with that. I'd hint around if I thought they just missed or overlooked something...a 1/2" drill will get you in that tolerance?

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  11. #27
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    An old timer I worked with in the 60s had gone to Detroit during the depression because there was always a little work in the job shops making parts for automobiles. One day the owner of the shop brought up a young Jewish boy and told Art this was his new helper. He had a brand new tool box and when Art picked it up, there was nothing in it. The boy explained that he needed a week's pay bad, so he spent the last money he had on the box and told the owner he had experience. He promised to do anything Art told him to do if he didn't turn him in. Art didn't and found that he was a real hustler and fast learner. After he got on his feet, he wanted Art to quit and open a clothing store, but Art decided to stay with machining. Then he said "His name was Robert Hall, and I've worried about that ever since."

    Bill

  12. #28
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    A machinist replied to a job ad of mine.....he had a suitcase full of commendations and references.....and he also had all the beautifully made parts of a model loco...I put him on ,and sure enough he was straight away making stuff in my time with my materials.He was really good ,tho ,never needed to do anything twice,which is what cost money in the maintenance trade......but within 12 months he got restless ,and moved on.Never stayed anywhere more that a year ,from his references.


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