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    Default 10K Help

    A little help please. I have just acquired a 1956 10 Light that needs a little attention. The compound screw has a slight bend that causes a tight spot with every turn. I've disassembled to the screw and collar bushing. The question is: does the screw simply press out of the bushing? The parts list shows no screw or other attachment methods. Anyone care to put me on the right track? Many thanks.

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    Mike,

    I'm assuming this is the situation you're referring to? http://www.wswells.com/data/parts/948D.pdf

    If so, the screw cannot be removed without disassembling the hand wheel components and removing the graduated dial front and back housing that screws into the compound casting. If you remove those pieces the screw simply comes off.

    If I've misunderstood, my apologies.
    Stephen

    Edit: it's been a while since I've had mine apart, you may not need to remove the bushing for the dial that screws into the casting, only the handwheel components and the graduated dial. You'll also likely need to remove the bolt holding the feed nut to the compound base. Remove the gib and it should come apart fairly easy, remove the nut with the screw and don't bother trying to unscrew it as I believe the shoulder on the screw is inside the compound casting, it would have to come out through the bottom. That said it's late and its been a while, I might be completely wrong.

    Additionally, if you've done all of this and the shaft is tight in the collar bushing then you've found the problem, something is causing binding in the bushing. I would think that bend would have to be fairly substantial to cause that level of resistance. You either have a major burr catching or a chip lodged between the two. If it is in fact bent that much you'll likely need to replace the screw and nut IMO.

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    Yes, all has been disassembled. Two pieces are left, the screw and the collar bush. The collar spins freely, but does not slide off. It looks like it shoul just fall off. Puzzling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Lee View Post
    Yes, all has been disassembled. Two pieces are left, the screw and the collar bush. The collar spins freely, but does not slide off. It looks like it shoul just fall off. Puzzling.
    So the screw and #18 are stuck in the casting? Or is the graduated dial stuck? Make sure you take out the oil set screw where the bushing threads in, unlikely as it may be it might be over tightened and wearing against the screw causing a burr.

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    No. #18 will not come off the compound screw, though it spins freely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Lee View Post
    No. #18 will not come off the compound screw, though it spins freely.
    I think some pictures might help at this point. Can you remove #18 from the casting? It shouldn't take much force, there should be a hole for a spanner in the underside of the bushing. Make extra sure #19 is removed first as it can destroy the bushing thread.

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    many times the binding is actually a misalignment of the nut...can sometimes be remedied by simply loosening the nut locking screw and winding the compound all the way back...the nut can be in there tight , a couple light raps if so to free it up..

    if all is disassembled and 18 won't slide off it likely took a hit on the handle and put a little kink in it...if that is the case you can hold the bushing(18) threads in your chuck(not actually clamped on them, but letting the chuck jaw ends bear on the back side of the bushing)and use the tailstock with a center in it to gently press it.

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    I can't figure out how to post pictures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Lee View Post
    I can't figure out how to post pictures.
    To be honest, it's often easier to use a hosting service like imgur, I guess I use it wrong as well as it seems to always scale my images down to a blurry mess.

    I suggest you try 10K's suggestion, I was under the impression that you had the compound completely apart and still couldn't get the screw out. If it's still threaded in the nut then you should take that apart first.

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    Yes, that's it. 18 won't slide off. I'll give it a press today. Thanks you for the help.

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    Gmail
    Here's a pic of the bushing on the screw. Spins very nicely but does not want to slide off.

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    It probably has a little ridge of metal that has been raised by the handle being tightened. If possible push the lead screw as far into the housing as possible and try to file it off. Other alternative is just press it off and plan on replacing the bushing....

    Tim

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    I really wish I could see your pic....but we ARE talking about the compound???

    NOT the cross slide? They assemble totally different if it's a large dial, you cannot press the cross feed or it WILL break, it has a hidden pin.

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    Thanks to all. The compound bushing pressed off the screw very easily. As was suggested, there must have been a burr. I didn't find anything but massaged the surfaces a bit with some crocus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    I really wish I could see your pic....but we ARE talking about the compound???

    NOT the cross slide? They assemble totally different if it's a large dial, you cannot press the cross feed or it WILL break, it has a hidden pin.
    Would you mind telling me more about the hidden pin and the breakage of the large dial assemblies? Thanks.

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    It only applies to the large dial cross feed assemblies....there is no pin in the compound dial assemblies small or large.

    For some reason I cannot see your pic...but am glad you got it without incident.

    Here is a good pic of the large dial assembly,it has thrust bearings thus the different design- you can see the "top hat" piece with the little 1/8" pin holding it, sometimes those pins can be hard to see....BTW there is no reason to take it apart unless there is a problem.
    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...37-reduced.jpg

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    As I said earlier, the compound dial is off. I have been able to address the reason for disassembly, other than to clean things up. There was a lumpy feeling when turning the screw, as though it was bent. With the gib removed, the compound top would shift left and right while turning thr handle. Once apart, I could see the bend. It was at the narrow section of the screw. I chucked it up and did a little tap-tap-tap. Good as new. Thanks again to those who replied.

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    I was referring to the cross slide large dial assembles, sometimes guys think they just HAVE to take something apart even if there's no actual problem.

    What you did was perfectly appropriate, you had a problem and you fixed it.

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    I'm hip to that. I've fixed many an unbroken thing over the years. Age has instilled either wisdom or fear. I leave the working works working. This is my first lathe. I am having a ball going through it. The saddle is in a clean smooth state. I'm now deep into the apron. Absolutely fascinating. The process of the rebuild solidifies my understanding of the use of the machine. Can't wait to clean up the quick change.

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