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  1. #1
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    Default 13" Southbend Chatter

    I have a new to me south bend 13" , and I am having a hell of a time getting it to cut decent without chattering. It seems to me there is likely a clearance issue or something in the head stock. I half ass tried to mess with the shims in it and didnt have too much success..

    It cuts great when I have a steady on a longer piece of stock , or a center in the tail stock which leads me to believe the headstock may in deed be vibrating. I have tried an array of different cutters as well.. I do use some carbide tooling , but even with aluminum and some very high rake inserts I still get some chatter. The finish is not too good either.

  2. #2
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    Check the lift and end play of the spindle

    YouTube

  3. Likes Kevin T, michiganbuck liked this post
  4. #3
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    Thanks I will try that.

  5. #4
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    What diameter piece are you turning? How are you holding the piece? If in a chuck, how far does it stick out of the chuck? If it's an older 3 jaw chuck there's an excellent chance the piece is not being held firmly enough and if the chuck is worn there's no chance it will ever hold anything firm enough. A good, straight 4-jaw (independent) chuck may be something that could help you before you tear into the head stock bearings.

  6. #5
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    There's a section in this South Bend bulletin on how and to what tolerance to adjust your head stock spindle and thrust bearings.

    http://www.wswells.com/data/howto/H-4.pdf

    Ted

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  8. #6
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    Did you check and make sure your headstock bolts are tight?

    Does the machine cut an unwanted taper on parts?

  9. #7
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    Spindle .0015 both ends cold. I like to feel up/down and back and forth
    Fingernail shaving tool bit or insert sharpness.
    Check chuck markings on part to see not front tapered at jaws.
    Bit/insert not correct to center line of Part.
    Compound travel to have just a little feel on gibbs and not set hanging way out.
    Tool holder not far out hanging.
    Side cutting edge too long.
    Nose radius to big
    Turning RMP too fast.(or too slow in some cases)
    To much part hang out for part diameter.
    Tool holder holding bit/insert at an angle that does not relate to desired clearance.
    I would add back and side rake but seems you have tried changing that.
    Gear/belt/pulley or something causing machine vibration.
    look at dull bit/insert with a loop to see edge only wear.
    Saddle travel not down on ways.

    I know all basic and everybody knows that but still good to think about.


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