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Thread: 1925 9 inch

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    Default 1925 9 inch

    New to the forum and fairly inexperienced with lathes. Played around with one back in college and haven't touched one in a decade. I'm a mechanic at a golf course I enjoy fabricating things and have wanted one for awhile, i run into a fair amount of stuff that i could use a lathe for. Particularly the rollers on the cutting units. I picked this up for $500 over the weekend i hope it was worth it. It didn't come with a 4 jaw chuck, what is a decently priced one?




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    Welcome to forum

    Here is some info related to your Series "O" - like the unusual apron controls

    Thanks to Mr. Wells for scan

    http://www.wswells.com/data/htral/19...1913_htral.pdf

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    Every body wants a good deal and we are afraid that maybe we paid too much, It seems to me that we forget that machine tools are tools. It's not about what they cost it is about how much can they make. Some of the tools that I have, the added value is not in $ but in how much I enjoy using them. The photos you have presented show a nice clean machine, which in my possession would easily give me the amount you paid just in pure joy. Now the heart of you question. Small potential hobby machines bring a premium. Most of us guys are pretty willing to pay lots, sometimes in my part of the world, thousands, for just such a machine. A friend of mine sold his fathers 9 in south bent for $2400 in sunny flagstaff AZ. Tim

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    I'm pretty certain that I saw that lathe a couple of weeks ago when I bought my Bridgeport. The gentleman was getting on in years and selling off all of his shop machines to downsize.

    If it's the same one, from the few minutes I looked at it and saw it run it appeared to be a very nice machine is excellent condition for its age. If I had the extra cash with me at the time I would not have hesitated to bring it home with me.

    I'm glad to see it went to someone who will appreciate and make good use of it. Enjoy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by timvercoe View Post
    Every body wants a good deal and we are afraid that maybe we paid too much, It seems to me that we forget that machine tools are tools. It's not about what they cost it is about how much can they make. Some of the tools that I have, the added value is not in $ but in how much I enjoy using them. The photos you have presented show a nice clean machine, which in my possession would easily give me the amount you paid just in pure joy. Now the heart of you question. Small potential hobby machines bring a premium. Most of us guys are pretty willing to pay lots, sometimes in my part of the world, thousands, for just such a machine. A friend of mine sold his fathers 9 in south bent for $2400 in sunny flagstaff AZ. Tim

    Your right, in retrospect it was a silly comment on my part. I know just the tooling in reamers, drills, mandrels, etc. Is easily worth what i paid for it. I am absolutely ecstatic over this. Always wanted one to play with, now i have one. I am no lathe expert but working with equipment over the years you can get a sense for how well something has been maintained, and this was well maintained. There is no noticeable play in any of the bushings. There is no serious rust or rust pitting that i have found.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shpxnvz View Post
    I'm pretty certain that I saw that lathe a couple of weeks ago when I bought my Bridgeport. The gentleman was getting on in years and selling off all of his shop machines to downsize.

    If it's the same one, from the few minutes I looked at it and saw it run it appeared to be a very nice machine is excellent condition for its age. If I had the extra cash with me at the time I would not have hesitated to bring it home with me.

    I'm glad to see it went to someone who will appreciate and make good use of it. Enjoy!
    I can almost guarantee you it was. I got it from a guy that was getting on in age, wanted to downsize and told me he sold his milling machine a few weeks ago.

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    Nice machine. The price you paid was fair for what you got. You got powered horizontal feed and cross feed. I have 2 wide nines(juniors) just like yours. One I have everything to change it to a QCGB and powered crossfeed. The other is a plain Model C with a complete set of change gears. If you ever get another bench to mount that on lose the drive system you have. Get a South bend horizontal drive and a serpentine belt. You don't need the double flat pulley just get a three phase motor with a VFD. You will never regret it. Look by your headstock and you will notice a third hole in the bed with no screw in it. That is so you can mount a QCGB. They are the ones with a single tumbler. You need a lot of other stuff to make that work on that machine so don't be fooled into thinking that is all you need. It is a bolt on mod if you do get all the related gears/brackets and cover. Can use your lead screw with a little modification. Having the apron you have really makes it easier to go that route if you choose. Just remember that a steady/follow rest and a lot of other stuff from the newer SB nines will not fit that machine.

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    looks like a winner...how about pics of what's in the drawers?

    my choice for a good budget 4 jaw- TMX 6" 4 Jaws Hard Solid Jaw Semi Steel Body Independent Lathe Chuck | eBay

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    WOW, Your O series is a thing of beauty.

    My 1922 O series had several coats and many colors of paint on it when I got it and when I cleaned it up and repainted it I wish I had known at the time it was suppose to be black.

    That black is beautiful and it seems to be in very nice shape as far as ware and tear.

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    Black may be beautiful, And that lathe does look very good. But if all your machines were black in your shop, you need at least twice as much light to see. And if you don't believe me try lighting a room with dark wood paneling, and/or Dark furniture. Even just a dark wood floor can cause Lighting problems. That is one of the reasons why gray is preferred over black. and whereas black is historically correct, for machine that is intended to be used, this may not be practical. Depending on your eyesight of course.

    stay safe and have fun.

    Joe.

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    Here's what i have in the drawers.





    I think i have a full set of gears, at least most of them.

    I've never seen a chuck like this.

    The motor running it, picture isn't all that good since i couldn't see the phone screen when taking it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommy1010 View Post
    Nice machine. The price you paid was fair for what you got. You got powered horizontal feed and cross feed. I have 2 wide nines(juniors) just like yours. One I have everything to change it to a QCGB and powered crossfeed. The other is a plain Model C with a complete set of change gears. If you ever get another bench to mount that on lose the drive system you have. Get a South bend horizontal drive and a serpentine belt. You don't need the double flat pulley just get a three phase motor with a VFD. You will never regret it. Look by your headstock and you will notice a third hole in the bed with no screw in it. That is so you can mount a QCGB. They are the ones with a single tumbler. You need a lot of other stuff to make that work on that machine so don't be fooled into thinking that is all you need. It is a bolt on mod if you do get all the related gears/brackets and cover. Can use your lead screw with a little modification. Having the apron you have really makes it easier to go that route if you choose. Just remember that a steady/follow rest and a lot of other stuff from the newer SB nines will not fit that machine.
    Thanks for the info, for now i'm happy just playing around with it as it is. I want to figure things out before i start changing a bunch of stuff. Changing the drive system would make sense, i kinda like the look of the overhead shaft but it would make sense to change it. As it is since this is sitting at work i'm going to have to come up with a guard system for those belts before too long. At least before next spring when the safety lady and the workman's comp adjuster walks through.

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    Very nice haul...you have the hard to find goodies..steady and follow.

    might want to investigate that part marked Indian Chief.

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    That part marked Indian Chief goes to that big vice you see laying on the skid. It just happened to get put in there when it was taken off the bench.

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    You sure did get a lot of stuff with that lathe, looks like lots of fun.

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    This looks like a really sweet machine. First off, it was obviously well taken care of. All too often you see machines
    of this vintage that are in rough shape, not clean, not kept in lube. Everything is there on the machine, nothing broken.
    The former owner even thought to put a non-standard flip-cover oiler on the oil hole for the clutch handle. Where
    chips would tend to pack in. That tiny feature tells volumes about who owned the lathe. Also the steel chip pan
    under the bed, somebody really cared about this machine.

    The tooling is nice. Steady rest, follower rest. There is what seems to be the correct collet adapter and draw bar
    for this lathe. The adapter may or may not fit 3C collets which is what a more modern 9" machine would use. I don't
    see any collets in the photos however.

    If you are lucky the set of gears shown are the correct ones, and are complete.

    If you plan on doing any threading then you want to fit a threading dial to the machine if you can
    find one that fits and works correctly.

    When I find a machine of this vintage in that condition, I try not to haggle it down much if the price is fair,
    if it's a private seller. And that was a pretty fair price I would say.

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    I got around to taking the chuck off (it needed cleaning, really gummy) and started playing around with a center. It looks like someone bored out the spindle to accept MT3. From what i understand isn't the head supposed to be MT2? The center i stuck in it seems to run true without wobble. I'm waiting for a new dial indicator to come in to really see though. Would it be a good idea to find the proper reamer and clean it up, or as long as it runs true just leave it be? Personally i'm leaning towards the latter, considering my current skill level with lathes is about good enough to ruin something.


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    The head should take a MT3.

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    Thanks! Like I said I don't know much. Thought I read somewhere that it was mt2.


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