9" Model A Update...First Run Video / Problem
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  1. #1
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    Default 9" Model A Update...First Run Video / Problem

    I reached a mini-milestone of sorts this morning, that being the first running
    of my 9" after 3 months of total rebuild.

    The side gears all seem to work well but could use some heavier gear lube to quieten down
    a bit. Their clearances were set using the "piece of paper" method, so none are too tight
    or too loose. The motor is giving off its usual loud hum, which I hate. There is also a
    slight "ching" I hear on occasions despite replacing the bearings in the motor.
    Also, I clearly need a new power belt.

    However, I have a problem on the QCGB. The right pin on the gear selector is not coming all
    the way upward to allow insertion of the pin into the hole. It feels like it is meshing with gears,
    but when I hold the selector up and manually turn the pulley, I do not see the lead screw turning at all.
    The GB went together easily during assembly, and "by the book". I'll have to inspect closely later.
    I hope I don't have to remove it. Any ideas appreciated.

    Anyway, here are a couple of videos for your viewing pleasure.
    Enjoy and stay safe.

    PMc

    YouTube

    YouTube

    gear-selector-prob.jpg

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    is it possible the selector arms are reversed?
    been a while since ive been into one so i may be way off, but if memory serves the arms are specific left and right....so that if a right side arm is installed on the left side the gear on that arm will be offset so that it doesnt really engage the gears on the shaft.

    manually turn the gearbox input with the left tumber engaged, you should see the shafts turning from the end of the box.

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    I have to manually turn things to get to a lot of positions too! That smooth part of the lead screw is pretty useful!

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    I just took a look at my before and after photos and I already see the problem.
    Both sides of the selector gears are supposed to be inboard in the yokes.
    I managed to install one with the gear on the outboard side, and it's the one
    giving me the problem.

    See photos.

    Thanks for input 10K.

    PMc

    thread-selectors-before-1.jpg img_0673-2.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    I have to manually turn things to get to a lot of positions too! That smooth part of the lead screw is pretty useful!
    Those gears on the selectors are free spinning and you're not supposed to have to turn the lead screw to mesh them;
    after a try or two, they should just slip into position. It's sort of like putting back gear into position; the first
    couple of times the gears won't mesh...third time is a charm!

    Although I never spray anything on my lathe with WD40, you might try using the tube applicator and squirt some
    into the little roller bearings on your selectors to free them up....if you can see or get up under there to do so.

    PMc

    thread-selector-after-1.jpg

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    Smile

    Here are some closer views of my newbie mistake. I guess I wasn't paying attention to gear orientation
    when pressing in the pins...my bad. Hate to have to disassemble my work, but I guess I have time on my hands.
    First two photo shows correct orientation of gears. Last photo shows result of my mistake.
    (I think I'm half brain-dead anyway these days!)
    Otherwise I'm pleased with how the machine runs.

    ecu-gear-select-b4.jpg ecu-gear-press-out-copy.jpg ecu-gear-select-mistake.jpg

    PS: How do I get these photos to show up in larger size instead of looking like thumbnails?

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    your pics are fine.
    just right id say.

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    Okay, thanks.
    I probably have my screen sized too small.

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    A friend sent this to me, thought I'd stick it here in case you haven't seen.
    Now THIS is a REAL lathe!
    Love the blending technique at the end.

    YouTube

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    By the way, the problem has been solved. I removed the QCGB and offending gear; flipped it around, and re-installed it on the bed. Gear selectors work and mesh fine now.
    But....not soon after I was admiring my work, I look over at the workbench
    and spotted two damn felt pieces that had dropped out. So had to remove it yet again,
    install the felts, and reassemble for the third time. It's all good now.

    PMc

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  14. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    The side gears all seem to work well but could use some heavier gear lube to quieten down
    a bit. ...
    Glad to hear you've got it all back together and running. One thing that concerns me (JMHO) is using gear lube on the side gears. There is a good chance that the lube can collect swarf, chips, etc. and result in more wear than necessary. The whole system (well almost) was designed to use oil on the gears.

    As earlier JMHO

    -Ron

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    Cool

    I agree with you Ron, but to a certain extent. I did have lighter oil on them for awhile during run-in, but just
    as an experiment, I tried the gear oil to see if there was a difference in the sound as they sounded a bit "jingly".
    There was not. I recall using a sticky spray-on type grease decades ago. I did quieten the gears, but I didn't
    like that crap and washed it off. I don't think I've ever used grease.

    However, I assume you were looking at the video where I had none of the covers yet on the lathe.
    They have since been installed (photos below) and I can guarantee you that it will take
    quite a lot of high flying chips to find their way onto the side gears. Nor do I use compressed
    air for that matter.

    Two other lines of thought. Oil is oil, and 90 wt. gear oil is oil. As I read somewhere, if
    its good enough for the punishment that gears get in a car's rear-end, it's certainly okay
    for these little cast iron gears, if not better. Makes sense to me.

    What is really paramount is that a lathe, any lathe,
    needs oil and it needs it frequently. I have seen so many lathes that have just been dried up
    for years due to laziness or ignorance or neglect. I still specifically use Spinesstic for the spindle, and,
    the next weight oil (on the list) for QCGB and all other oiling points. I don't use the gear oil anywhere
    else. So it's all good. She's oily, very happy, and in better shape than ever for a 74 year old!
    I do appreciate your opinions and feedback.

    PMc

    img_0757.jpg img_0758.jpg
    Last edited by mcload; 04-08-2020 at 11:04 AM.

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    I understand about the gear covers but my concern is that chips, swarf, misc. bits seem to fly EVERYWHERE, even places that seem to defy physics in my shop. Unless something is hermetically sealed, and even then I have doubts, the little bits will somehow find a way in. Yes, the covers help minimize this but still don't prevent it.

    That being said, it looks like you've done a great job on the rebuild. Wish my lathe looked so good.

    Best regards,

    -Ron

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalCarnage View Post
    I understand about the gear covers but my concern is that chips, swarf, misc. bits seem to fly EVERYWHERE, even places that seem to defy physics in my shop. Unless something is hermetically sealed, and even then I have doubts, the little bits will somehow find a way in. Yes, the covers help minimize this but still don't prevent it.

    That being said, it looks like you've done a great job on the rebuild. Wish my lathe looked so good.

    Best regards,

    -Ron
    Thank you for the kind words Ron!

    I agree that nothing is for certain when it comes to "swarfage" (gee, I love that word) getting into everything. I guess thats where good maintenance comes in. I wish I could say that she gets a workout every other day, but that's usually not the case anymore. If I were busy with "production work", I wouldn't have had time to rejuvenate it. That's just the way it is these days.

    I have another 9" waiting in the wings for a makeover, that being a '59 B-Model 9". Not in a big hurry to start it either as I still have a few T's to cross on this one. I may also want to first build a cabinet/stand for it just to be able to assemble as I go along. I plan on a butcher-block top on this one, and it won't be "L" shaped.

    I finally figured out where I want the fwd/reverse switch. My plan is to mount it elevated just above the tailstock (by a few inches) near the end of the bed. Before, it was directly up near the motor where I had to reach over the spinning work to shut it off/on. Although I never had any problems, it was just not a good location as the switch got quite nasty from swarf. Given how crowded it is on the left with QC gearbox, I decide on the right end where nothing really happens and there is plenty of real estate. I have never cared for switches being mounted on top of the gear covers either...just personal preference.

    I have made a custom ½" mounting plate for the switch which will be supported by a 1" alum rod. The rod will be supported by a used mounting arm designed to hold the swinging gear-cover door. (I already have an extra one holding the light). All I need to do is turn down one end to ½" and the upper end to ¾" diameter to fit the plate.
    But I don't yet have my compound rests put back together to do any turning. Hopefully will this weekend when I get a 10-28 tape from McMaster.

    Although it looks great for photos, I think the 3-jaw chuck I currently have on the machine is just a tad heavy for the spindle. I do have a bunch of smaller 3 and 4-jaw chucks that are lighter and have less overhang. That big chuck was something my Dad cooked up. I do wish these 9" lathes had actual bearings in the headstock as opposed to "floating on spindle oil". But you can't beat how easy they are to assemble/disassemble by one person.

    I guess that's it for now. Carry on and stay safe!

    PMc

    dial.jpg Attachment 284413


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