9" South Bend, No 415YO, to buy or not to buy? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsAmoreEel View Post
    It has change gears. The ones currently in it are in good shape, but it does not have any extras.
    Based on this alone, HARD PASS.

    You either want something with a quick change gear box (preferred) or one that has a COMPLETE set of change gears. The former being the better way to go by far.

    Personally, I would never buy HF junk. Skip it.

    I would recommend being patient, if you can. You can also check to see if there are any makerspaces near you that may have a lathe you can learn on and use. It's how I got started.

    Be patient. And either build up a budget or be prepared to have a project. You never know what's under all that grease and grime until you clean it off. I would never have known how bad the half nuts were on my lathe until I took the apron apart.

    Old vs. new. You can probably tell which is which.

    half-nut-comparison.jpg

  2. #22
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    Sorry to offend, Homebrewblob. Personally, I was put off that the site even required that info. I also didn't know that people traded directly on here. I had really only browsed as far as the stickied threads on SB lathes.

    Glad to confirm my suspicions on the HF. I guess you can't trust inexperienced hobbyists on youtube.

    It seems I'll be playing the patience game. Eventually a nice deal will come my way, and I'll have the finances to take it. In the meantime I'll have to work on other projects.

    Unfortunately, my area is too rural to support maker's spaces. I've thought about looking for classes at the local community college to learn more machining skills.

  3. #23
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    I'll add my vote to the Buy side.
    I've bought and sold a number of SB 9s and 10k over the years. Last week I bought a 9A very complete, but the ways were worn past what I deemed worth spending time on, so I passed it on to someone less demanding. Now, if a partial 9C turned up with a nice bed, I sure would have kept that A and made a nice lathe between the two, and sold off the extras. Good 9" beds are getting hard to find. If you can see flaking in the busy section in front of the chuck, it's gold to me.

    With all that in mind, if this lathe turned up locally, I'd buy it. I might negotiate that down and try to buy it under $300. Tailstocks are plentiful, and it's not that hard to get one matched to the spindle. Toolpost is easy, just order a QCTP set and some toolholders. Chucks are easy - I just posted one on ebay 5 minutes ago, original Cushman 5" from a 9A, also have several 4-jaws I have not advertised.

    As to change gears, I rarely thread on my lathes. And if you aren't threading, you can put off buying those ($125) half-nuts. I suspect the OP could get by fine on one speed. More likely, he will be hand-feeding most of the time, and disengage those noisy gears.
    The main thing I don't like about the 9C is the lack of automatic apron feed. That's a must have for me. OTOH most of the small projects I use my lathe for can be done just fine on a 9C.

    So I'd buy it, and add what it needs. When a better lathe comes along (it will) then you will be a smarter shopper. The SB will then sell for what you have in it, and likely more.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsAmoreEel View Post
    I'm more concerned about my data sitting in a server at amazon than I am about any actual people tracking me down.
    Unless you are taking extraordinarily complex steps, Google, Amazon, etc., all know where you are - there is no need for any tracking you down. Shoot, even this board knows where you are (but not the participants).

    But I do agree with you in not wanting to put your personal data on the internet.

  6. #25
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    the best thing to do with the HF lathe shaped object is dump in the recycle barrel . junk for any real work.

  7. #26
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    Since you say you don't know anything about lathes, why are you hung up on a South Bend brand? There are a number of other good lathes that will work perfectly well for the "hobbiest" level activity. Why not broaden your search a little and look for Sheldon, Clausing, Atlas, Rockwell, and other metal lathes as well. You could very well find something better than what you're looking at now.

  8. #27
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    Since you say you don't know anything about lathes, why are you hung up on a South Bend brand?
    I'm not, an SB 9 is the just the first lathe I've come across in my area that is in my size and price range. I'd love to come across comparable machines from other brands as well.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    Unless you are taking extraordinarily complex steps, Google, Amazon, etc., all know where you are - there is no need for any tracking you down. Shoot, even this board knows where you are (but not the participants). But I do agree with you in not wanting to put your personal data on the internet.
    Realistically, the days of Internet privacy have been long gone for years, if not decades. The very minute you boot up your computer
    or phone, you are being tracked, including by the government. Start going to various websites, incl this one, and tracking "cookies" are
    automatically loaded into your device. These cookies remain in your computer INDEFINITELY unless you remove them, which I do every night
    when I shut down. Just remember that your computer is an intrusion into your privacy and it can get hacked at any given moment. You are
    fighting a losing battle.


    -------------------
    By the way, I'd also stay away from very old machines. Try to find something that was made in the 50's or 60's. The good thing about South Bend lathes is the sheer number they made and sold, making availability of parts something you can usually count on. Off-brands, possibly not so much. (I'd love to sell you a 9" SB I've "restored", but it will be a couple months before it's ready to list, and will probably be out of your budget).
    Don't count out a SB 10" either, even though a bit bigger and heavier....they are wonderful machines too!

    BTW, "SBLatheman" (Ted) on this site is a good source for NOS parts should you ever need them...there are others too like Rex TX and Tommy 1010
    (Interesting that this post has gotten so much response without seeing a single photo!)


    PMc

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    I'd add Logan to your list to look out for. I had a couple of them over the last 10 years and liked them (only sold due to redundancy). They're good old American Iron and the OEM is still supporting them. Small parts, gears, lead screws, etc. can be had new without breaking the bank. Castings are pretty spendy, but available. Their layout and construction is comparable to SB, but they liked using roller bearings in the head stock, and they had an interesting enclosed belt drive system. One of mine was a model 200 without the QC gearbox, but had no change gears other than what was on it. I watched eBay and pieced together a nearly complete set for less than $200 all together, and also had my half nuts re-machined by a seller on there for $175 I think, before selling the lathe.

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  12. #30
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    If you can afford to drive a ways, I can recommend shopping at HGR industrial surplus (hgrinc.com). A lot of what they have is used factory machines. Probably the lowest prices you'll find anywhere. And yes I've seen them offer crates and boxes full of change gears and chucks.

  13. #31
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    It seems this thread has died.

    Thanks again, everyone, for the help. It turns out I just had to expand my search radius on CL and I started seeing a lot more lathes. Going to go look at a 12" Atlas complete with 2 chucks and some tooling this weekend, asking 1500.

  14. #32
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    Sounds to me like too much missing darnit. I'd actually want the gearbox but lacking that I'd sure want a pretty complete pile of change gears.

    Otherwise these are great little machines. The flat belts are faster shifting than they look like they'd be and fast polishing is the only thing handicapped by the old fashioned spindle bushings. Of course if you wanted to take on batch collet work you'd want the gearbox.

    If you had a complete pile of change gears I'd say the Southbend is preferable to the little hobby lathes with their plastic feed gears but lacking those critical things that this one lacks I'd say keep looking.


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