AC motor for an old South Bend bench lathe... - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    ODP motors were commonly used....maybe it's just me,but with cheap TEFC motors available seems a waste of money.

    do you have a horizontal drive or an underdrive?

    one or two step countershaft? (big pulley)

  2. #42
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    10K,

    The motor sits under the pulley assembly and swings with the pulley unit when engaging/disengaging. Since the mounting plate is at about a 30 degree angle with the motor hanging downward any protruding receptacles for wiring or capacitor locations become a problem for mounting. The motor is horizontal and its pulley supplies drive to one larger pulley above. The problem is space... the motor nearly touched the bench when in position. I like your idea for power, I may be forced into a more problematic motor for interference issues, however.

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    I would still implore you to do some more research...IIRC that type motor is for things like fans primarily...low starting torque and not easily reversible.

    I stand to be corrected, as I am having a "moment"

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  5. #44
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    You are correct, interestingly, the motor that just went out on the machine was an old GE with the exact specs of the 6XJ57 motor - it is of a vintage where there were no bearings, just bushings. I'm guessing that was quite an old motor! The use of this lathe is for very light purposes, I never need to reverse and cut mainly wood, plastic and some aluminum for tooling fixtures for instrument building. The lathe shows its age and wouldn't hold tolerances for work with steel. So I'd like to get it working with as little adaptation as possible. Your input is quite valuable and if you have other thoughts on the issue/s, please post them!!! Oh, by the way, does anyone make belts for these old SB lathes?

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    I would be willing to bet with things adjusted properly that lathe will turn out fine work.

    But you need a motor.

    Can you post a pic of your lathe just so there can be no confusion as to what you have?


    EDIT- would get confirmation but I believe this is the modern equivalent to your old motor-

    Marathon Motors 5KC49PN6051 1/3 HP 1140 RPM 115/230V General Purpose Motor | eBay
    Last edited by iwananew10K; 03-04-2019 at 12:43 PM.

  7. #46
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    I have to admit I'm badly confused by this thread. I've read it through several times and I still don't understand the issue(s). It appears that the lathe we're discussing is a bench mounted unit with the pivoting countershaft assembly that uses an over-center lever to tighten the flat belt on the cone pulleys.

    If that's the case and if there's an issue with the motor hitting the bench, then the motor is not mounted in the correct place on the motor plate. My 9JR has a very similar configuration and with the cone pulley belt tight, there is about 9" between the center of the motor shaft and the top of the bench. This is a 56 frame motor, the same frame size as the discussion motor. Almost every 56 frame motor I'm familiar with has slotted mounting holes which would allow the motor to be moved up and down on that mount plate.

    And if the motor is on the "underside" of the motor plate which is at a 30 deg angle to the vertical, then the cone pulley drive belt is too short or the countershaft assembly is mounted too far back on the bench.

    When properly set up, there is no reason for a 56 frame motor to hit anything on that lathe.

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  9. #47
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    10K,

    That's the one!

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    Dobermann,

    You are correct on the centerline of the motor's placement. The motor that 10K above links to is the exact style of motor that was on the machine. I'm concerned that the AC wiring locations on some TEFC motors might interfere with the range of motion IF it also has the capacitor shroud. Notice on his link that the AC leads follow the small inlet location - (and I'm a DC guy, so you'll have a better idea of styles/types of AC motors!). Some of the TEFC motors I've seen have a rather "extended" AC connection, can't find the right words for a description, but I think you know what I mean...? Are there TEFC motors with the same AC connection/s as the motor in the link?

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    10K, the parts are all off the machine - would a photo still help?

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    Yes, it will still be enough to tell what you have

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    10K,

    I'll get the photos up ASAP. Is this the type of fully enclosed motor you're describing?

    Dayton Mtr, 1/4HP, 1140RPM, 115/230V 6XJ14 | Zoro.com

    Craig

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    In your environment there is no need for a TEFC motor. How old is the ODP you are replacing? An ODP cools better than an TEFC. I worked in the mining industry for 40+ years and we had thousands of ODP motors from 1 to 400 HP, ODP's much preferred over the TEFC's, a lot less "green smoke" failures on the ODP's. If you want to feel good about buying a new motor get a price on a rewind, it will be amusing.

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    Waiting for pics, as it's hard to recommend anything without knowing what you actually have...most important is pics of headstock and countershaft.

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    I'll get on it! I suspect the motor may be the original... it's a bushing motor with the old fabric twisted AC wire and 2 prong plug.

    BTW, I'm not seeing an "add photo" section on the forum. My email is [email protected] if you can send me a hello from 10K I'll reply with the photos! Thanks so much for the help, I'd like to get the old girl up and running again!

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    {I'll get on it! I suspect the motor may be the original... it's a bushing motor with the old fabric twisted AC wire and 2 prong plug.}

    O.K you do need a NEW motor..Lots of posts on here as to what motor to get.

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    Got pics...it's an old top oiler 9" with the 1 step countershaft.

    What diameter motor pulley do you have now? 1140rpm may not be the best...although you can change that motor pulley easily and single step pulleys are cheap...if you confirm your motor shaft size I'll do the best I can to find a direct replacement.

    I still feel you are better off with a different motor though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    Got pics...it's an old top oiler 9" with the 1 step countershaft.

    What diameter motor pulley do you have now? 1140rpm may not be the best...although you can change that motor pulley easily and single step pulleys are cheap...if you confirm your motor shaft size I'll do the best I can to find a direct replacement.

    I still feel you are better off with a different motor though.
    Motor pully = 4 inch (5/8" shaft about 2" past the bushing cap).

    Belt pully = 9 inches.

    Please do give me a link on the motor you'd use. The old motor had a simple plug for 115AC, If I go with a different motor will I need to rewire?

    Thanks!!

    Craig

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    the motor I would use would be 3ph/VFD.

    the thing about resilient base motors is they are quite expensive nowadays.
    I am a bit of a curmudgeon, and can not be convinced an OPD is better than a TEFC.

    IMO if you stay single phase you are better served with a 1/2HP 56 frame ~1725rpm motor...if you go 1725rpm you will need to use a ~2" motor pulley.

    You will have to drill and tap new mounting holes or ask someone to do it for you...chances are even with a new resilient base motor you would have to anyway...you *might* be able to use your old base on a new motor but even that's iffy.

    It's tough from this end.

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    I used this motor on a 9A horizontal drive and it fit perfectly with no modification. Very easy to wire to the reversing switch.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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    10K,

    Thanks for all your time on this project, it is much appreciated. If I understand you correctly, and reading back through your posts, the motor you recommend allows a reverse (as opposed to the single phase unit that was on the lathe originally). It also has overload protection and variable speed... am I missing any other advantages? I should be able to drill new mounting holes - aligning the damn thing will be fun :-)!!


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