Another 9" Rescued!!
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  1. #1
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    Cool Another 9" Rescued!!

    Hello crew; thought I'd give a little report on a newly-acquired 9" SB lathe. This will be my second, and needed like another hole in the head! But I tend to call it a "rescue" as it's been decades since last used. (In fact, I may have been the last one to use it...but that's another story). Needless to say, I've known about this lathe for a long time now. While I was going thru my first 9" Model A, replacing felts and a complete breakdown and re-paint, the thought occurred to me that I should make a call about this other 9" I knew about. Frankly, I didn't remember what model it was nor its condition. So I made a modest offer and the owner agreed. He told me I got it only because he knew to whom the lathe was going and that it would be well taken care of. That was nice to hear. (This lathe was not on the market).

    So I went over today (Jan 31st) to take a look and to get some pics. I didn't want to buy something with broken gears or that was too far gone. As it turns out, I believe this is a Model B 9" lathe. The serial number is kinda strange; guess I'll need to inquire and get a card on it. But it's 42052NBR9. The last NBR9 is kind strange. This may be older than my 1946 lathe. (If anyone has a guess, let me know). The lead screw at the "common work area" looks great, and the ways themselves are excellent. I can barely feel or see any kind of wear ridge. However the gears on the side have a bit more wear than I like, but they are fine.

    As you go thru the pics, you'll see a homemade wooden guard. Easy enough to find the original styles on EPay. The rear (large) drive pully looks a bit different than mine as the left side has a bigger end for the shaft, and possibly some different shaped spokes. Don't know if you can see it very well, but the power switch is sitting on what appears to be a homemade bracket bolted to the spindle. I don't yet know what that's all about.

    No idea about the motor, but its pretty big, including a big capacitor. It is wired for 110 vac. The rubber supports on the mount for this motor are shot, and the motor bangs downward, slamming the capacitor down onto the bench. Decided to unplug it and leave it off. I did not get a chance to test the split nut threading lever or the star clutch for power feeds. Everything else seems to be as expected with light surface rust. There is a 3-spoke steady-rest and a collet set that goes with it, but no other exotic attachments. Small selection of drills, bits, and rusty reamers. I has a 3-jaw chuck on the spindle and a 4-jaw in a drawer. The 3-jaw has nothing stamped on the front face, but there is a SB logo stamped on the back threaded mounting plate. I didn't look too closely at the
    4-jaw, not that it matters anyway.

    So here are a group of photos for your viewing pleasure. I intend to go take it apart next week for transport, removing the saddle/apron assembly and probably the spindle. I won't have any help when I get back to the house, so it needs to be light. I may also unbolt that motor as well as it looks heavy. I'll leave the lead screw in place for the meantime. I cannot use the bench at all...no space for it to begin with, and it doesn't seem to be very well built. When I get around to restoring this 9" lathe, I may build yet another custom bench like the one my Dad built 70 years ago. I become accustomed to it. (I thought maybe a Kennedy chest went with it, but no dice, not much in it but junk anyway). As many of you know, rescuing vintage machinery is a dreaded disease!
    Appreciate any feedback.

    PMc

    wide-right-1.jpg

    wide-left-1.jpg

    compound-chuck-1.jpg

    motor-pully-1.jpg

    rear-pullys-1.jpg

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  3. #2
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    The last guy that used this lathe was making professional old-school cinema film camera stuff. I doubt that he was the original owner.
    Last pic is of the cabinet of my current 9" Model A; I'll probably reproduce it for the 9" i just got. But getting ahead of myself; that will be many
    months down the road.

    Additional Pics.

    serial-no.jpg

    side-gears-2.jpg

    spindle-1.jpg

    gear-cover-emblems-1.jpg

    img_0434.jpg
    Last edited by mcload; 01-31-2020 at 08:27 PM. Reason: Add photo

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    Why did you build the bench like that? If the bench was rectangular, you could put in drawers for tools and things. Also, that narrow arm where most of the lathe is mounted will NOT be catching much of the flying swarf. Instead, it will end up on the floor behind the lathe, where it will be more difficult to cleanup.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    Why did you build the bench like that? If the bench was rectangular, you could put in drawers for tools and things. Also, that narrow arm where most of the lathe is mounted will NOT be catching much of the flying swarf. Instead, it will end up on the floor behind the lathe, where it will be more difficult to cleanup.
    You are sort-of right about the bench, however you are seeing it (above) partially disassembled for painting. See attached below for where I am on it now. Many things have been taken off the bench that you can't see.

    There are three deep drawers on ball bearing slides covered by a door on the left part of the bench. Those have been removed for painting. The lowest drawer holds 4 chucks, face plate and numerous dogs. Lots of other goodies in the top two as well.

    The big opening you see on right is covered on both sides by doors, and contains more bigger items like steady rests and collet collection. When I plan on cutting a lot and making chips, I usually swing up an additional chip catcher that covers that area in back. It normally lays flat on hinges against the backside. So all things considered, it's a GREAT bench and not just another rectangular base that looks like an inverted door.

    My garage is quite small so I try to maintain minimum "footprint" on machines where possible. I can relatively easily slide this lathe and bench fully into a corner when not in use.

    Thanks!

    PMc

    Still working on it!
    bench-progress.jpg

    garage-1.jpg

    garage-2.jpg
    Last edited by mcload; 02-01-2020 at 08:43 AM.

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    Though I wouldn't mind starting with a bench like this, but would have to build in some storage cabinets.
    Would save me some time, but certainly not money!

    bench.jpg

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    Is your bench made out of wood?

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    Yes Sir it is. Remember, it is 70 years old; I didn't make it.
    But it is stout enough for a little 9-incher.

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    Default Nice

    Looks like you have a nice project on your hands and from the looks of your shop the skill to do a first class job, good on ya and have fun
    Look forward to the progress of the rebuild

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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by 3512B View Post
    Looks like you have a nice project on your hands and from the looks of your shop the skill to do a first class job, good on ya and have fun
    Look forward to the progress of the rebuild
    Many thanks! Yes, fun and sense of accomplishment is paramount!
    (But I really should be working on my project car!).

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    Nice man cave. I could never have a setup like that as a working shop as it would be trashed in a matter of days, but a great home for light/rare machine use.
    Good luck with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tobnpr View Post
    Nice man cave. I could never have a setup like that as a working shop as it would be trashed in a matter of days, but a great home for light/rare machine use.
    Good luck with it.
    Many thanks for posting.
    Yep, the garage started like all others...hot, dirty, minimum available power.
    It's not like this all the time unfortunately, but I try to keep it neat.

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    Just an observation about the belt pulleys differences. There is a clear difference between my 1946 SB 9-incher and the one I just got a few days ago. The '46 has 6 spokes while the other has only 3.
    I hope it's still from a SB and not from another manufacturer. Guess I need to look at some photos on-line.
    Not a big deal in regards to operational use.

    Update: I have seen this 3-spoke on other SB lathes on Internet, so it's authentic. I just don't know the year.


    10-22-pulley.jpg motor-pully-cu.jpg
    Last edited by mcload; 02-01-2020 at 04:22 PM. Reason: update

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    I just found this lathe on the PDF of serial numbers, and it looks like this lathe was built in 1929! WOW.
    The other letters bare out that it had a standard gear change set-up and regular spindle hole.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    I just found this lathe on the PDF of serial numbers, and it looks like this lathe was built in 1929! WOW.
    The other letters bare out that it had a standard gear change set-up and regular spindle hole.
    I don't think so. IIRC, SB started making the lathes like yours around 1935-6. They also reset their numbering system in the 1945-50 time frame, so there might be identical numbers, one pre-switch and one post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    I don't think so. IIRC, SB started making the lathes like yours around 1935-6. They also reset their numbering system in the 1945-50 time frame, so there might be identical numbers, one pre-switch and one post.
    Okay thanks for the heads up...I didn't know about resetting serial numbers.
    It did seem like quite a stretch to think that 9" was made so long ago.
    Will have to get a serial number search and card I guess.

    PMc

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    Have you been to "The SBL Workshop" here?

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    I would guess it's a 1957 Model 677, 12 speed, I can't guess the Bed length, Z(3-1/2') or A(4')

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by swells View Post
    I would guess it's a 1957 Model 677, 12 speed, I can't guess the Bed length, Z(3-1/2') or A(4')

    Steve
    I came up with sometime in late 1956 as the ship date, but it's just an swag from the chart. There is a 42029NAR9 lathe in the database that seemed to have been shipped in '56.

    According to the serial number, this 9" started life as a Model B.

    EDIT: And I see that it still IS a Model B! Getting my different threads confused!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    I came up with sometime in late 1956 as the ship date, but it's just an swag from the chart. There is a 42029NAR9 lathe in the database that seemed to have been shipped in '56.

    According to the serial number, this 9" started life as a Model B.

    EDIT: And I see that it still IS a Model B! Getting my different threads confused!
    Many thanks for the research!! Yes, I did take a look at that "new" PDF which is where I came up with the erroneous mfg year.
    Not sure how I did that quite frankly. 1956 sound much more reasonable and believable.
    I go load it up tomorrow (Monday). I'm not sure of the bed length either. I just assume 4 footer.
    Thanks again!

    compound-chuck-1.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    Have you been to "The SBL Workshop" here?
    Yes I did.


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