Another 9" Rescued!! - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    That would look great with a QCGB. I may have the QCGB and lead screw for that machine buried in my stash of SB stuff. Need bed length. PM me if interested.

  2. #22
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    Just thought I'd post an update of sorts. I went over to where the lathe was this morning and began tearing it down for transport. Everything went smoothly and had it done and loaded in the truck within an hour. (My daughter was not pleased that I used her yoga mat to protect my truck bed!).

    I finally had a look at the motor plate and it seems that it might be original. General Electric; 110 vac; 1/2 HP; 1725 RPM. One of the rubber mounting rings on the frame is shot, causing the motor to bang down on the bench when activated. Surely I can find an outfit in Houston that can go through this motor and make it semi-new again.

    I also found 3 separate numbers on the lathe bed casting itself (besides the serial number stamp). One uses slotted screws, the other two use brads cause they are inside the webbing arches. One number is 1W4NK5; another is BPM; and the last is 8017 (or is that a B?).
    I searched the forum for bed casting number info and found nothing, not that it really matters anyway. The minutia will cause a brain disorder!

    So the bed and all these parts are safely inside in AC under my project car. It will be a few months until I get around to building it up as I've got one other 9" ahead of it in line.

    Here are some photos, and thank you for your interest and thoughts.

    lathe-bed-stripped-3.jpg motor-plate-.jpg lathe-bed-casting-number-1.jpg lathe-bed-casting-number-2.jpg lathe-bed-casting-number-3.jpg

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommy1010 View Post
    That would look great with a QCGB. I may have the QCGB and lead screw for that machine buried in my stash of SB stuff. Need bed length. PM me if interested.
    Yes, not only would it look good with a QCGB, it would be so much more user friendly! But I tend to be somewhat of a stickler about authenticity and originality. But at the same time, I realize additions like a QCGB happen all the time with these little 9" lathes. (And besides, we're not talking about a rare barn find Corvette where everything is important about the numbers!).

    So yes, I'm interested, but currently without the wampum to buy it right now. BTW, the bed length is 4 feet.

    Thanks for the post!

  4. #24
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    I'm looking for an authentic "turnbuckle" nut for a SB 9". Its basically the long threaded coupler between the two tensioning rods.
    The hardware style I have works fine of course, just looking for the real deal, if not too expensive. EPay has them, but you have to buy the
    entire assembly, and they aren't cheap. Just wondering if someone has one rolling around in bottom of parts bin.
    Thanks.

    PMc

  5. #25
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    Default Additional "As Found" Pics

    Just posting a few additional pics of condition as found.
    Not bad; just dirty and dry.

    apron-front-before.jpg apron-rear-before.jpg saddle-top-before.jpg saddle-under-before-1.jpg crossfeed-before-1.jpg

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  7. #26
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    What are those purple things on the saddle?

  8. #27
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    You're seeing the purple towel thru some holes in the saddle.

  9. #28
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    Don't forget the screw on the apron star wheel is LEFT-HAND thread.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yan Wo View Post
    Don't forget the screw on the apron star wheel is LEFT-HAND thread.
    Really?!!
    :-)

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    You're seeing the purple towel thru some holes in the saddle.
    Duh! It looked three dimensional in the picture. I thought that it was someone's idea of a felt substitute.

  12. #31
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    I have a B model workshop lathe and have made a sleeve that allows compounding of the gears that come with the machine.This allows you to make some not to shabby metric and oddball US threads.Someone on this forum does the calculations based on what gears you have.He will probably pop in here in a while.The B lathe is a versatile machine.I would not put a QC box on it.If you find a so called turning gear it gives a very fine power feed.The one I have is 116 tooth.It also is used in some of the metric and oddball setups.Enjoy.

  13. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by k3vyl View Post
    I have a B model workshop lathe and have made a sleeve that allows compounding of the gears that come with the machine.This allows you to make some not to shabby metric and oddball US threads.Someone on this forum does the calculations based on what gears you have.He will probably pop in here in a while.The B lathe is a versatile machine.I would not put a QC box on it.If you find a so called turning gear it gives a very fine power feed.The one I have is 116 tooth.It also is used in some of the metric and oddball setups.Enjoy.
    Great post K3, thanks. Yes, I probably will keep it a B-Model, and besides, I've never turned threads using a manual gear change machine.
    Might be something I'd like to try.
    I would most definitely like to find a definitive book on how to use the Model B and C gearing system.
    I'm not quite sure I know what you are talking about when you mention "turning gear". Is this something extra?
    Thanks.

    PMc

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    I have a separate question that's a bit off-topic. Ive been looking for a well-made hand pump oil can, and ran across
    a Swiss-made brand called REILANG. Boy do they look nice. I'd rather pay a little more for a quality can or two rather than
    having a dozen that leak all the time.
    So I watched this video and ordered one tonight.

    YouTube

    Towards the end, the cut to an oiler being used on a nice-looking 9A.
    This is between 2:13 and 2:54 on the video.

    Question, how does a person get the steel portions like nuts and handles so polished, almost as if chrome plated?
    Can steel really be made that bright on a buffing wheel?

    Thanks

    PMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Question, how does a person get the steel portions like nuts and handles so polished, almost as if chrome plated?
    Can steel really be made that bright on a buffing wheel?
    Yes, it can. The trick is keeping the rust off it when it is that bright.

  16. #35
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    I was told that the turning gear was made for the C model workshop lathe which has only longitudinal power feed,using the lead screw and split nut. The large gear goes on the lead screw to get a fine feed.
    The B model has a fine feed by virtue of the apron gears. Adding the turning gear makes it even finer. The one I have is 116 tooth and is marked turning gear.

  17. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    Yes, it can. The trick is keeping the rust off it when it is that bright.
    Okay thanks. Looks like I need to get some better buffing compounds for steel.
    And a tighter sewn buffing wheel. The one I have is old and sheds like crazy.

  18. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by k3vyl View Post
    I was told that the turning gear was made for the C model workshop lathe which has only longitudinal power feed,using the lead screw and split nut. The large gear goes on the lead screw to get a fine feed.
    The B model has a fine feed by virtue of the apron gears. Adding the turning gear makes it even finer. The one I have is 116 tooth and is marked turning gear.
    Thanks for the info; I'm trying to get my head around this. You mention you made a sleeve that allows compounding? I thought that if you
    altered the speed of the lead screw, you would be altering it's ratio in relation to the gears that determine the thread pitch. Again,
    I need some sort of book or instruction manual. Maybe send a pic of this sleeve you made? Thanks for your patience.

  19. #38
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    Shops that clean and tidy are indeed like an alien environment to me... and I marvel at whatever aptitudes folks possess to achieve such witchcraft.

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  21. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by car2 View Post
    Shops that clean and tidy are indeed like an alien environment to me... and I marvel at whatever aptitudes folks possess to achieve such witchcraft.
    Thanks...I think! Yes, I've heard that before from friends but not nearly as eloquently as you put it! Well said!
    All I can say is that it's a sickness; a disease; I'm guilty as charged. Maybe too much time on my hands, but I don't think so.
    If only you could see it now!! So full of crap I can barely walk in it. But yeah, it will eventually
    get straightened out. (I'm nearly 70 and I don't put up with hot, nasty garages anymore)!

    Part of the issue is that it's an attached garage with the door next to kitchen.
    I want to be able to go out there, shut the door, listen to some tunes and/or work on the lathe or table saw
    without getting the bottoms of my socks black as night.

    Here's a couple more pics, including what it looked like when we moved in...hot August in Texas no less. I did the epoxy
    floors myself; took months. With exception to running 220 out to another breaker box in the garage (which required an electrician),
    I also eventually installed a mini-split AC unit myself. There were only TWO AC outlets in the whole garage, so I installed about six 4-outlet
    boxes everywhere, each on their own circuit. (Hell, I have to do everything myself!). I insulated the bare garage doors with foam then attached
    thin plywood that I stained. The lights are LED 8 footers.

    I installed two electric lifts in the ceiling to lift the fiberglass body off that car (one of only two known to exist)

    History of the Venus – The Fabulous Venus!

    Sorry for going off-topic.


    garage-before-purchase-copy.jpg garage-2-small.jpg garage-workbench-small.jpg
    Last edited by mcload; 02-08-2020 at 03:52 PM.

  22. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    Yes, it can. The trick is keeping the rust off it when it is that bright.
    Hint: move to Utah.

  23. Likes mcload liked this post

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