Brand new PRISTINE 6"x18" Atlas/Craftmans lathe
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    Default Brand new PRISTINE 6"x18" Atlas/Craftmans lathe

    I am not sure if this is the right place to put this or ask,but I thought I'd pick someone's brain.I found someone who has a "brand new"(still in the box) 6"x18" Atlas/Craftsman lathe.Its a perfect size for me and the work and parts I want to make,I know its not a more "robust" lathe. It has some limited tooling,mainly the single point tool post holders.I think there's a right,left,I think its either a strait post and a knurling too or both?.There's only a face plate,maybe a lathe dog,no 3 or 4 jaw chuck.I have no idea how hard it would be to acquire the chucks because the lathe is useless to me without them.Its got some extra gears too.I can't recall what else?He wants allot of money for the lathe due to its pristine condition,which I think is still "too high" despite the lathe never being used.I don't know how to price machines,so what would be a fair price based on the new condition of the machine,but the limited tooling?

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    If you want a working machine, you'd be much better off (and dollars ahead) to buy one of the better CN lathes. I know it goes against the grain here, but the "Bear Brand" may offer something that meets your needs, has more guts and brawn, and is cheaper as a new tool.

    Only reason to buy this NIB older machine is to find a bigger sucker to flip it to, and there's no guarantee you'll wind up making a buck from that transaction.

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    That's true,I am thinking about "the sucker factor" but I would not be buying it(if I did) to flip it.Its nice that it is "brand new".I have no idea when Sears stopped selling these?40 years ago or more?However that novelty wears off considering it is lacking two of the most important tools needed and that's the 3-jaw and 4-jaw chuck.Not much good to me without those two things and that significantly dwindles its value(in my mind) despite its pristine condition.Its most alluring qualities (to me)are its size and I think it runs off a standard 110v,but I am not sure?I am not familiar with what a CN lathe is(or is that abbreviated for Chinese?),so if you have a moment,by all means please do educate me.

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    You may end up being frustrated, depending on what it is you want to do. Most likely if it's NOS then you'll be paying a large premium for that, which would be far better spent on a South Bend 9A. Far far more capable, no change gears, bigger spindle through hole (not by much but it makes a difference) and still relatively easy to move around or fit in a small workshop.

    I'm in the process of putting a SB 9" lathe back together and can't wait to pass on my Atlas 618. It's super well tooled, as accurate as I can be, but it's still a small relatively flexible lathe. That said though, it's proved a forgiving lathe to learn on and I've made a lot of neat stuff with it.

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    Leave it for a collector, IMO. There are better lathes for less money if you want a user.

    Also, read the rules, Atlas/Craftsman is off limits here.

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    First off the A____ brand is banned from discussion on this site, just call it a Clausing. I'm not familiar with the 6" model, is it a change gear or does it have a quick change gear box? If change gear note that they are a pia, its so much easier with a QCGB. Chucks should be easy to find on ebay. Not sure its worth a premium price, unless you are a collector and plan on leaving it in the box to age and appreciate in value.

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    Sorry,I did not read the rules.I didn't know where to post something like this.I know its not a Southbend.I actually would be happier with a Southbend 9a if I could find one locally,but its hard to find something like that out here.Its not like the rust belt on the west.However,I know someone who I met recently who might have one(not sure yet).



    Also, read the rules, Atlas/Craftsman is off limits here.

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    they're change gear lathes. Not a major deal, but if you can get a lathe with a quick change gear box for similar money it's an easy choice to make.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpolacchi View Post
    but its hard to find something like that out here.Its not like the rust belt on the west.
    widen your search parameters in both distance and model. Logan and Sheldon (and others) all made 9-11" lathes that are equivalent or even better than South Bends, depending on who you ask. Use Search Tempest and put a distance limit that you can drive there and back in a day if you need to (250 miles?) and see what pops up. Ask on here too, this lot are a bunch of inveterate machine tool junkies and probably have a 9-11" lathe tucked in a corner that they've forgotten about

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    Yes, CN is the country code for China. The "Bear Brand" is Grizzly, just one of the vendors of Chinese lathes around the country. I'd look for a new machine, one with a quick-change gearbox to allow easier speed and threading changes, and get the biggest machine you can handle (with friends), as there's always a situation where you wish you had a little more space to work in.

    Stiffness and power are key to a lathe, you can find machines with 220V single phase motors (compatible with standard household power if you have access to both incoming phases), and my take on this is "buy once, moan once". Get something that will make you happy with it for years, rather than wishing you'd bought bigger/better within a month.

    Perhaps we should ask about your experience level - have you used lathes before? That would potentially change my advice...

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    I'll probably not be getting it(due to a number of factors I'm already aware of) and again..."apologies" I wasn't really paying attention to rules.Mainly I was inquiring opinions of the subject,nothing more.

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    I know one.I just have to ask him if he has the southbend or not.

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    I've been out of the trades for a while now,but yes I have used all kinds of lathes.I learned on a Southbend,used them,Clausing,Cincinatti,Monarch lathes,mills and surface grinders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpolacchi View Post
    I've been out of the trades for a while now,but yes I have used all kinds of lathes.I learned on a Southbend,used them,Clausing,Cincinatti,Monarch lathes,mills and surface grinders.
    If you used "real" lathes, you would not be at all happy with the NIB A/C lathe. Find a better option...

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    "He wants a lot of money for the lathe..."

    All boils down to this: $100, not a lot. $1000 too much of a lot.

    Three factors:

    1) cost
    2) condition
    3) proximity

    Consider the addional expense of tooling you will need to purchase.

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    Another thing to keep in mind as your quest goes on is that if you keep the brand originally mentioned at the top of this post on your list of options , they made alot of parts out of Zamak . Zamak is s pretty funky compound . Folks have been known to put all their gears or other Zamak parts in a bag or drawer for safe keeping only to find when they open the bag / drawer that there is only a pile of funky grey dust left . That will runi your day/month just as much as dropping a 4 jaw chuck on yer toe
    animal

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    I already have a lead on a better lathe suited for me(I think?).Not sure if he will sell it,but maybe he will?Its a small watchmaker's type of lathe I think?Masterson I think it is?Or is it a Manson?No idea how much they cost?I've found that some of those small machines can be pricey and have very expensive tooling.I'm looking for something small for mainly turning and can hold some decent tolerances.Not necessarily for chasing threads,maybe turn a taper if need be?I don't know much about these small lathes either.There were so many different manufactures,makes and models of lathes made over the past 120 years I don't know them all.

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    I have actually never heard of an Atlas or Craftsman lathe up until about 2-3 years ago when I met someone who had one.That was the first time I had seen one.

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    A decent condition logan lathe will likely do better work, be more fun, and last longer than a new small Cr lathe. likely you will have another $500 to bring the Cr up to usefulness.

    Likely $600 for a no-equipment CR lathe would be max.
    and with that likely, you will have $1200 into it...the price of an OK logan or South Bend or the like.

    QT: [a small watchmaker's lathe] another limited use lathe...

    I guess a hobby guy could make pens with such a lathe and have fun doing that. Yes once it was tooled up for making pens.

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    Well there are “real” lathes and hobby lathes.
    The atlas/craftsman have always been a hobby lathe.

    Folks out there making money and keeping the world turning using real production lathes in shop environments is what bred lathes for over 100 years into the machines they are now.

    So industry set the standard and hobbyists followed

    As said if you’ve ran a production lathe then you’ll quickly find out how bad all the hobby lathes are, they can do good work but as I said the bloodline/evolution is completely different.

    Get a machine that kept America rolling, not a toy for your garage work bench, you wont regret it.

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