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  1. #1
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    Default compound tee nut

    So the only way i can make a tee nut for my new AXA QCTP is to turn a round one?

    i read i can make a rectangular one in the 4 jaw chuck but i cant picture how to do the stepped side cut outs...

    Maybe i could turn an over sized round one then use the 4 jaw to trim it back to rectangular shape (with round ends)

    Mark
    Complete Novice
    1935 9in model B Workshop

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    Size the blank in the 4 jaw chuck as you say. Make it the t- slot width x length equal the axa body width. Take the blank and turn the upper part of the t-nut round with diameter just small enough for the t-nut to slide into the slot. Turn the round portion in the 4-jaw so you are cutting the t-nut height. It will work fine.

    T-nuts are typically a milling job and the easiest way in a mill results in that common t-nut shape. Making a t-nut in the lathe results in the round portion because it is just easier that way. As you gain experience you will find the type of machine can have influence on the final part shape, nothing wrong with that as long as it works.

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    Hacksaw and a file, done in a few minutes.

    allan

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitno455 View Post
    Hacksaw and a file, done in a few minutes.
    allan
    That works. Another point: if you turn the large diameter oversize you can square the sides by
    putting the part into the four jaw chuck, sideways. This allows you to square off the side of the
    larger diameter on one side. Flip it around and then you need to set it in the chuck so the newly
    formed flat side is parallel to the chuck face. Often a six inch scale can be used as an improvised
    thin parallel for this.

    Remove parallel before starting spindle...

    This is a fussy job but will do what you want, a T nut that won't spin when you tighten the
    toolpost. Fussy jobs are what happens when you want to get something done and don't have

    a) a milling machine or
    b) a lathe milling attachment.

    Fussy jobs are good for learning technique.

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    I did mine with an angle grinder with a metal cutoff blade to remove most of the negative metal, then used a flap disk in the same grinder to smooth out most of the cut marks, then a file for the final touches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post

    Remove parallel before starting spindle...
    That made me laugh.

    Thanks to you all i get it now, ill end up with a rectangular tee nut but the upper raised portion will be round same dia as upper portion of compound slide slot.

    Thanks guys

  11. #7
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    [QUOTE=Ralph63;3447206]That made me laugh.

    You do understand, mine was the voice of experience, hard learned!
    Rule two is, never stand inline with the spindle when starting it up.


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