High School 9A Spit and Polish - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    So I was wasting time before leaving work today and I ran across this picture in a fleabay auction for a very old SB lathe. I was surprised about how similar the countershaft drive system is to the one I am making, other than in scale. It's like the man said, there is nothing new under the sun.

    I'd love to have a place for an old horse like this one.

    Baxter

    _57.jpg

  2. #22
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    Well I am finally starting to reassemble this lathe. Here are some pictures of the finished stand and the new drive system. I have lots of little parts that still need to be either painted or polished. I hope to get it all back together this weekend.

    Baxter

    img_1506.jpgimg_1507.jpgimg_1508.jpgimg_1509.jpgimg_1510.jpg

  3. #23
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    The step pulley on the countershaft is on backwards!


    img_1511.jpgimg_1512.jpgimg_1513.jpgimg_1514.jpgimg_1515.jpg

  4. #24
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    Like I said, the step pulley is backwards, but you clearly get the idea of how it will work.

    img_1516.jpgimg_1517.jpg

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    southb-walesd.jpgsouthb-prec-.jpgp1230562.jpgHi Baxter, my first post here, nice progress and of great interest to me as ive just picked up two 9A`s in the UK (a 1942 and a 1964)The 64 one is in pretty good shape and hadnt suffered the rust on the ways like yours has .Im still learning as i knew almost nothing of South Bends until this month.They seem like great little lathes. Mine are currently in pieces and ive been spending hours with degreasing and electrolysis. Heres a couple of pics if the forum allows me to.
    Bob

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    They look nice, especially the '64. It's a very rewarding process. I have finished stripping the last of the small parts and am getting ready to paint them. Then I need to reflect the gear box and get it put back together. Then it will start to be pretty close to finished.

  7. #27
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    This machine is about 95% assembled. I still have a few items to deal with, the biggest of which is painting the gear cover. That is an eBay gear cover since the one that came with was busted.I also need to wipe all the oil off so I can get at least one set of pictures of a ristine machine before it turns dirty again.

    However, I wanted to get it up and running to see how well the drive system performed. Unfortunately, the frame I welded together was not adequately stiff to be tensioned just from one side of the frame. With the drive belt attached to the lathe, it caused the whole countershaft frame to twist when the tension lever was engaged. I ended up welding a cross brace to form a truss between the two bearing mounts. That stiffened up to the point that there is no more flex when under operating tension loads. However, I have decided it is ugly. I think, when I get around to it, I will make a new countershaft pivot assembly out of 1/2" plate. That should be sufficiently stiff and will also better reflect the original styling of the machine. Of course if I really wanted to reflect that styling I would cast that pivot assembly, but that's not happening.

    I am running a 3 phase motor with a VFD. The VFD will mount under the bench and completely out of the way and out of sight. I will have two buttons (run and stop), one switch (FWD/RVS) and one POT for adjusting motor speed. These will all get mounted in a single gang electrical box. Now, I need to decide where to mount it. Any suggestions? I am thinking of making a mount off of the base just to the left of the countershaft assembly and above the headstock. Other options are in front of the headstock on the left side of the bench, on top of the QCGB and others I have not envisioned yet. If you have any suggestions, I'd appreciate it since it is basically a blank canvas.

    Here are pics of the lath running and showing the new cross brace on the countershaft assembly.

    Baxter

    img_1542.jpgimg_1543.jpgimg_1544.jpg

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by panabax View Post
    So I was wasting time before leaving work today and I ran across this picture in a fleabay auction for a very old SB lathe. I was surprised about how similar the countershaft drive system is to the one I am making, other than in scale. It's like the man said, there is nothing new under the sun.

    I'd love to have a place for an old horse like this one.

    Baxter

    _57.jpg
    To my eye, this photo shows a typical, and not terribly well-executed, overhead lineshaft conversion. There are a million old lineshaft machines out there where someone built a mount for an electric motor so they could use it with a water wheel or steam engine powering the whole building. Functional, yes, but not very aesthetic if you're into that side of machine ownership. We all are, just some of us are more willing to admit it than others who claim they only care about cost per operating hour, etc.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    To my eye, this photo shows a typical, and not terribly well-executed, overhead lineshaft conversion. There are a million old lineshaft machines out there where someone built a mount for an electric motor so they could use it with a water wheel or steam engine powering the whole building. Functional, yes, but not very aesthetic if you're into that side of machine ownership. We all are, just some of us are more willing to admit it than others who claim they only care about cost per operating hour, etc.
    And BTW, even the undermount drive machines use the same kind of countershaft. It's just hidden inside the leg.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by panabax View Post
    I am running a 3 phase motor with a VFD. The VFD will mount under the bench and completely out of the way and out of sight. I will have two buttons (run and stop), one switch (FWD/RVS) and one POT for adjusting motor speed. These will all get mounted in a single gang electrical box. Now, I need to decide where to mount it. Any suggestions? I am thinking of making a mount off of the base just to the left of the countershaft assembly and above the headstock. Other options are in front of the headstock on the left side of the bench, on top of the QCGB and others I have not envisioned yet. If you have any suggestions, I'd appreciate it since it is basically a blank canvas.
    I am bumping my own thread to solicit some feedback on the power/reversing switch location. In addition to the options above, I could also try to mount the switch on top of the left side back gear guard, where the factory drum switch mounted. I do not have any of the mounting hardware for the drum switch. I have seen that there is a piece that mounts to the guard and the drum switch mounts to it. Does anyone have an idea if it would be a simple matter to attach a single gang electrical box to that mounting piece instead of the drum switch? If so, I may try to locate that piece.

    Thanks,

    Baxter

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    Quote Originally Posted by panabax View Post
    I have seen that there is a piece that mounts to the guard and the drum switch mounts to it. Does anyone have an idea if it would be a simple matter to attach a single gang electrical box to that mounting piece instead of the drum switch?
    Well, the answer is yes. It is a pretty simple matter to attach a regular single gang box to the original drum switch mount.

    img_1553.jpg

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    Hi Baxter,

    Nice recovery, another South Bend saved from the scrap heap.

    I have a Hercus based on the South Bend, and went through similar processes you did. One thing I was not happy with was the rust staining on the vee ways of the bed. If you experienced a similar problem, were you able to remove them?

    Ken

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by neksmerj View Post
    One thing I was not happy with was the rust staining on the vee ways of the bed. If you experienced a similar problem, were you able to remove them?
    My machine had a lot of surface rust on the bed. I removed all the rust from the bed with the electrolysis process described above. It basically converted all of that rust back to iron. It went from reddish brown to black. The black residue then wiped off easily with a super fine scotch brite pad. I have no residual staining.

    Baxter

  14. #34
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    So, I am basically done cleaning this old lathe up. Here are the finished pictures. It is not up to Paula's standards of either paint or polish, but it is still pretty good. I stripped everything and repainted with oil based paint. I did brush it all on, so it lacks a certain elegance that comes from really doing a great spray job. Excuse the mess, my garage has been pretty well consumed by this project and I am just now starting the process of getting everything where it belongs.

    I got the legs with the auction, but the chip pan was basically toast. I made this pan out of 11 gauge sheet. The whole setup is very rigid. The pan is 24" in total depth.

    The serpentine drive system worked out great. I was planning on redoing the countershaft mount, but I do not think I will. It is a little utilitarian, but it works great and adding the single cross brace solved the flex issue I had originally experienced.

    The VFD allows full control of RPM from zero to just under 1500. I can't imagine I would ever need to spin it faster than that (I'm not sure the spindle bearings are even rated for 1500 - is there a max spindle speed on these old cast iron bearing machines?).

    Anyway, it was well worth the effort. I have my old 9A listed on the local CL. I think I currently have it listed too high ($2k), but I am in no great big hurry to move it and good 9As don't see our local CL that often. If any of you is in the Dallas area and looking for a 9A, I would certainly drop the price to something more accommodating of the community. PM if you have any interest and I will send you pictures.

    Thanks for all your help.

    Baxter


    img_1571.jpgimg_1573.jpgimg_1574.jpgimg_1577.jpgimg_1578.jpg

  15. #35
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    Well my original 9A sold pretty quickly. If you saw my recent posts, you know I just picked up a very nice Heavy 10 along with a Rockwell vertical mill. Now, I am sad to say, the lathe chronicled in this thread has got to go.

    Here is the local CL ad.

    Beautifully Restored South Bend 9A Lathe

    I know $2500 is too high. Let's say PM members get a $500 instant rebate on the asking price before the negotiation starts. I'm not trying to pimp this lathe around and I am definitely NOT in the business of buying and selling lathes. I do, however, have an OCD problem as it relates to these machines. Anyway if there are any other OCD types out there looking, this one is available. It really is a nice machine. I thought I would own it forever.

    Baxter

  16. #36
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    Nice re-built 9A. If I ever do another one, I will try the electrolysis reduction method of turning brown rust back to metal.


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