How to Remove a Stuck Chuck -- Tutorial - Page 5
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  1. #81
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    I'll volunteer for stupid. I did break a tooth on the bull gear removing a chuck. It is easy to do. I did this on my 10k when it was a year old. I engaged the back gear and used a dead blow hammer on the chuck wrench. It was the shock that broke the tooth. The chuck was not stuck. Since that time, I engage both the high gear pin and put it in back gear at the same time and then just smoothly pull on the chuck wrench. This has always been sufficient to remove the chuck assuming the threads are both clean and oiled.

  2. #82
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    I broke a back gear tooth off my 9 inch the first day I owned it. Sort of made me sick to my stomach. I'm use to bigger heavier machine gears. It was a nice gear. I'm going to attempt a repair with brass rod and a mill. My brazing experience on cast iron isn't too bad.

  3. #83
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    I know that this is an old thread, but I had a stuck chuck and was looking for ways to free it. I had been trying, on and off for some time but it just wouldn't budge. I soaked it with Kroil a bunch of times and let it sit, trying to free it the next day. I have seen so many lathes on E-Bay with one or two broken teeth on the back gears so there was no way that I was going to use the back gears in this endeavor, or so I thought. In the past two days I intensified my efforts because I have a backlog of several projects that need some lathe work. Yesterday I started trying to use some shock treatment with a wood block against the jaws and a one pound hammer. But I did not use the back gears, I just used the motor with the pulleys set for their slowest speed to resist the blows. Still, it did not come free.

    Here is my possible contribution to this discussion. Yesterday I thought of trying an application of WD-40 on top of the Kroil that I had applied the previous two days. It did not work yesterday. But tonight I was trying to set up to try the technique suggested by Mr Borton, below. I found a pipe clamp with a four or five foot section of pipe and I was clamping it to one of the chuck's jaws. I had locked the rotation with the back gears because I felt that this was fairly safe if I was not going to apply a lot of weight or hammer on it. So I got the pipe clamp on the chuck (with some cardboard to protect the chuck) and I decided to just put a little pressure on the pipe, and not even at the far end, only about two feet from the chuck. I pushed down with a moderate amount of force and, BINGO, the chuck unscrewed as easy as you please.

    Now I can not say exactly what did it. Was it the accumulation of a couple of days of hammering? Was it the Kroil, finally working? Was it the combination of Kroil and WD-40? I really can not say. But if this happens again, you can bet that I will be trying that combination of oils again. Take it for what it is worth. It is certainly worth trying before other methods that may be potentially more dangerous.



    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Borton View Post
    Put a long bar in the jaws of the chuck as was said in the above post! Hang a bucket on the end of the bar with as much weight in it as you can get!
    Go to bed and when you get up the next morning the bucket will be setting on the floor and the chuck loss form lath! Be sure to use a long bar not a short one!

  4. #84
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    Well, here we are, 14 years after I posted the tutorial. I hope it has helped a few folks with stuck chucks. It certainly spurred some really good conversation! Here is the same 13 inch South Bend, still threading and chambering barrels, albeit in a different place. I keep that wrench handy "just in case" and have used it a couple of times since the original posting. Someone asked about getting a stuck faceplate off, and, as you can see, I use a faceplace with a collet chuck because I often turn between centers using a 5C Center. My comment on the stuck faceplate is that the principle is the same as a chuck when removing it. I haven't stuck this one yet, but tomorrow is always just around the corner!
    South Bend 13 by jakefromclemson, on Flickr

    Bill Jacobs (aka "Clemson")

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  6. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clemson View Post
    Well, here we are, 14 years after I posted the tutorial. I hope it has helped a few folks with stuck chucks. It certainly spurred some really good conversation!
    Bill Jacobs (aka "Clemson")
    I managed to get a 6 inch Buck stuck hard to my 10L spindle quite a few years back. Used the "put in back gear, long handle wrench on jaws and rubber mallet to the wrench" technique but w/ no luck. Fully aware that if I went too hard at it I'd break a tooth. No joy, chuck wouldn't budge.

    Made a clamp out of alum like you did. But broke the alum clamp!

    Made another clamp out of steel. That was what it took to get the chuck off. Put the clamp away for future use should it ever be reqd again.

    My thread on the topic about a week and a half after the OP's original post back in 2008...

    Stuck Chuck on 10L, & It's Not Rusted On

  7. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clemson View Post
    Well, here we are, 14 years after I posted the tutorial....
    I must be caught in some kind of temporal loop. I'll have to go check the calibration on my flux capacitor.

  8. #87
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    Default Thank you Everyone!

    Got my chuck off today. After trying many variations of suggestions in this thread.

    First I want to say thank you to all who have given advice!

    Here is the combo that worked on my SB 10k:

    1. Strap wrench on largest cone pulley, with a 3 foot extension arm of steel tubing on the strap wrench handle.

    2.7/8 inch piece of steel hex bar in the stuck three jaw, with a socket placed on the end, and an 18 inch straight bar placed into the socket. Three foot extension pipe placed over the handle of straight bar.

    3. While two of us torqued the two bars, a third squarely smacked the chuck with a rubber dead blow mallet.

    ONLY when we added the smacking with the dead blow did it come off. Torquing with the two bars alone wasn’t enough...the tapping with the dead blow AT THE SAME TIME as we applied torque was the deciding factor in my case.

    I couldn’t of done it without help from this forum so thank you everyone. I hope my added suggestion helps someone as much as the earlier forum posts here helped me.


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