Need some encouragement - Page 14
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 4121314
Results 261 to 278 of 278
  1. #261
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    years ago when i was drilling, one of the roughnecks working for me got the bright idea to hop in in a backhoe he had no idea how to operate to clean up a mess he had made, he managed to bump a 5,000 gallon fiberglass diesel tank cracking it enough to leak pretty bad, and of course he came to me wanting to know what to do. we pumped the fuel out into the rigs tank, got some electra clean and a wire wheel, cleaned up the crack and went to slathering jb weld into and over the crack, pumped all the fuel back into the tank, held like a charm, and no one got run off!

  2. Likes Homebrewblob, pavt liked this post
  3. #262
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmdriller41 View Post
    don't know how long it will take for me to get my skill set up to making a new spindle! and i found another buger i need to fix before i can get into to detailed a work, the shaft in the apron that engages the gears on the bed, the ones that make the compound travel up and down the bed has more slack than i realized in it, as I said earlier the more i learn about these Machines the more I'm learning what constitutes "bad", I'm not sure if its the shaft that's worn or the apron may have to sleave it?
    Shaft should be mostly steel and the apron should be iron mix. On my sb10L I had the same issue but it didnít actually affect the lathe. Bore and sleeve the apron and youíll be good, I wouldnít worry about the shaft, itíll take years to wear the sleeve back down any noticeable amount (with lubrication!)

  4. #263
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmdriller41 View Post
    years ago when i was drilling, one of the roughnecks working for me got the bright idea to hop in in a backhoe he had no idea how to operate to clean up a mess he had made, he managed to bump a 5,000 gallon fiberglass diesel tank cracking it enough to leak pretty bad, and of course he came to me wanting to know what to do. we pumped the fuel out into the rigs tank, got some electra clean and a wire wheel, cleaned up the crack and went to slathering jb weld into and over the crack, pumped all the fuel back into the tank, held like a charm, and no one got run off!
    Noice! Now THATS sketchy

  5. #264
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmdriller41 View Post
    don't know how long it will take for me to get my skill set up to making a new spindle! and i found another buger i need to fix before i can get into to detailed a work, the shaft in the apron that engages the gears on the bed, the ones that make the compound travel up and down the bed has more slack than i realized in it, as I said earlier the more i learn about these Machines the more I'm learning what constitutes "bad", I'm not sure if its the shaft that's worn or the apron may have to sleave it?
    Also I want to say, doing these repairs even if some day you decide the lathe isnít gonna work for you or even upgrade, this experience is NOT lost my friend. The more you play with these and other machines the more you find yourself using what youíve leaned on this lathe, think of it as that ďall encompassingĒ shop project your teacher made you build that looks like a pile of junk and has no purpose outside learning. Good thing about this project is it WILL have uses when you get there

  6. #265
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Pavt, I do AGREE with you the epoxy wonít melt around 120f, I think it may get softer then it is at 80f is all.
    I guess Iím just being a Nervous nelly. In my opinion I just would try to give the epoxy repair the best chance for success, JB weld for example in my experience doesnít appreciate any heat really. I think if he over time creeps down to that perfect .0007 clearance it would allow any chips or anomalies to work themselves out and wash into the Reservoirs with as little harm done as possible. Epoxy will scratch epoxy and I think a chip could wipe that repair out.

    But then again Iím a freaking handy man that replaces kitchen faucets, drywall and light bulbs but I did stay at a holiday inn Express last night
    alright guys i'm gonna show my ignorance/confusion on this post.
    my dial indicator says its in graduations of .001, i understand that to be thousandths.... ( i know i sound ridiculous but bear with me)
    earlier on a post i wrote my indicator findings just like that i believe it was .003 and .005, i took that to mean 3 thousandths and 5 thousandths, the needle only moved 3 small lines , and 5 small lines respectively.
    so home brewbob when you say nothing is .007, and made the correcting to.0007, it got me all confused? am i missing am i missing something painfully obvious to everyone else?

  7. #266
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Also I want to say, doing these repairs even if some day you decide the lathe isn’t gonna work for you or even upgrade, this experience is NOT lost my friend. The more you play with these and other machines the more you find yourself using what you’ve leaned on this lathe, think of it as that “all encompassing” shop project your teacher made you build that looks like a pile of junk and has no purpose outside learning. Good thing about this project is it WILL have uses when you get there
    100 % true, not mention its good for the soul to be in the shop!

  8. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  9. #267
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Jmdriller41 my name has a L after the b lol itís blob but donít worry as I ALWAYS get called bob on here haha, I prefer Homebrew.
    And Iím TERRIBLE with numbers and always have (one reason I actually took up machining to help fix myself.

    So 1.0000 is 1 inch
    0.1000 is 1/10 of a inch (this is where it gets tricky as this is a 1 tenth of 1 inch)
    0.0100 is 1/100 of inch
    0.0010 is 1/1000 ( 1 thou)
    0.0001 is 1/10,000 is 1 TEN thousandths
    My SB16 calls for 0.0007 MINIMUM bearing clearance (yours may too)

    When you hear tenth or tenth indicator itís Referencing the ten thousandths (.0001) not tens (.100)

    You was completely CORRECT about your measurements, your DIAL indicator is NOT a tenth indicator (.0001)

    but a thousandth indicator (.001) like you thought

    I have a Starrett 3908A tenth indicator (0.0001) with a MAX TRAVEL of .008



    when i said nothing is .007 i ment in MY POSTS I WAS INCORECTLY saying .007 but ment to say .0007
    any of my posts that say .007 is REALLY .0007 not .007 sorry about that!!!

  10. #268
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Roget that Homebrew, same here on the numbers, at some point in my thirties i just started being terrible with numbers, and names and like I've said before thought this hobby would be a good way to slow my noodle down and help me focus, unfortunately i didn't bring my books to work with me this time to review the specks. when i posted the readings i got and nobody was "like man your screwed" i just assumed that was close enough, I also obviously have a problem with blind assumptions! put that on my list to work on.

  11. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  12. #269
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
    Posts
    538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    357
    Likes (Received)
    291

    Default experience

    Yep, the experience will be worth a lot in the future. Most south bends are basically similar. The stuff you learned on one will work on another mostly. Like that apron shaft. They ran a steel shaft on the raw cast iron so they do wear out after a while. A $2 bronze bushing from the hardware store can fix it.

    Shop time is when i find my peace of mind.

  13. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  14. #270
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    I would go on to say that these skills learned on this lathe would extend far beyond southbend lathes, boring and sleeving a hole isn’t specific to this project

  15. #271
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    927
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    482
    Likes (Received)
    290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmdriller41 View Post
    alright guys i'm gonna show my ignorance/confusion on this post.
    my dial indicator says its in graduations of .001, i understand that to be thousandths.... ( i know i sound ridiculous but bear with me)
    earlier on a post i wrote my indicator findings just like that i believe it was .003 and .005, i took that to mean 3 thousandths and 5 thousandths, the needle only moved 3 small lines , and 5 small lines respectively.
    Just to clarify, the way you are reading indicator is correct.

    Not just lathes. On a great variety of machines, engines, etc. . . Look to be in the vicinity of .001" on clearance for oil. On engines, main bearings, rod bearing, wrist pins. . .All types of manufactures and sizes. the spec is about .001". The actual spec may read .00098", but noone will spit hairs like that. They will say .001".

    Same with bushings in gears that run on shafts. Its all about .001". There are minor variances due to temperatures of machines, or what type oils. But on very general terms, I see specs that fall in like this on a great many things: .0009" to .00125". Which is just a C hair over or under .001".

    The actual spec of your machine is .0007" to .001". That was with all new parts.

    I would NOT personally try to be inside of .001" with your repair. First try to get your clearances just inside of .002". You can run at .002", if need be. In general I think if you hit in between .001" to .002" you are fine. But I'd really like .00125" to .0015", would be my favorite for you and your repair, so 1 1/4 thousandths to 1 1/2 thousandths.

    Your .001" indicator is fine. You don't need a .0001" indicator for what you are doing.

  16. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  17. #272
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    927
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    482
    Likes (Received)
    290

    Default

    I really and truly hate to bring up oils. It will no doubt start a sh$# storm of replies, lol.

    Here's what I can tell you. I do work in the commercial marine industry. Tugs and barges, and primarily in petroleum industry. I am not a chemist, but I do go into refineries and talk to wide range of people, and see a wide range of machinery and equipment. Some things I have learned, first and foremost: Any lube is better than NO LUBE, which is how I find many of these old machine shop machines, .

    Next, not just South Bend, but many machine shop machines, the recommended oils are generally based off a mineral oil. There are different grades of this mineral oil, but they evolve from the same place, or same material we'll say. The thinner of those oils we call spindle oil which has a viscosity of 10 @ 40C/104F. Moving up the scale in thickness, still mineral oil, a popular oil is Mobile DTE Heavy/Medium. It comes from the same processes, but it is rated 65 @ 40C/104F viscosity.

    Now a couple of funny things. A variety of machine shop machines, not just South Bend, recommend that Mobile DTE series directly, or it is now the modern equivalent. Its a little funny because mobile themselves call for its use in turbines and circulating systems:
    https://www.mobil.com/en/lubricants/...E-Named-Series

    In a marine lube cross reference chart, also as turbine oil:
    http://www.shipserv.com/ShipServ/pag...0REFERENCE.pdf

    And one grade also listed as hydraulic oil, though from the same processes:
    Mobil DTE 24 hydraulic oil (5 Gal. Pail)

    I have gone through this a bit because I have other machines, an Oerlikon mill, and a recently acquired Monarch 61 series, that have more serious gear boxes. Both recommend DTE oils, but in examining them, the gears, bearings, clutches, forks, etc., its very simliar in design and spec to gear boxes I see in the marine field where they often use diesel engine oil as lube, 15w40. And those run a 100,000 hours easily under hard conditions, and hold spec.

    Anyway, spindle oil #6 10 @ 40c/104F:
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60002110

    Or Spindle oil #10 22 @ 40c/104F
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60002136

    Or Just an FYI, ATF is a very good grade synthetic Hydraulic oil is 30 @ 40c/104F.

    Mobile DTE heavy/medium:
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/00265462

    If you google a variety of ways, and include practical machinist in the search on oils, you will find a ton of threads and discussions. Some good links if you want to travel down that rabbit hole:
    DTE Numbered and DTE Named Oils - The differences explained

    what oil?

    mixing grades of oil, Mobil DTE light+ heavy, =medium?

    I bring all this up, because for you and your spindle, I'd go with a slightly loose tolerance as discussed .00125 to .0015". And a slighlty heavier oil, either spindle oil #10 22 @ 40C, or ATF which is 30 @ 40C.

  18. Likes pavt, jmdriller41 liked this post
  19. #273
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Hey jmdriller41, I was reading back a few posts and thought I might comment on the chucks again.

    If you already know this then disregard but I thought I mention it. as I know it, theres 2 main types of chucks Your gonna worry about regardless of number of jaws, a (universal/scroll) chuck AND a INDEPENDENT chuck.

    The scroll chucks are “self centering” and all jaws move together to close at once on the part at the same time.

    And independent chucks where each jaw has its own “chuck key screw” to adjust them independently.

    And I agree with Texasgunsmith, going below .0015 is sketchy with that epoxy, I would let it work itself out and let the epoxy polish up from running before closing the clearance any.
    If your gonna use a scroll to check runout then you need to mount the test bar AND turn it down until it’s running true AND THEN you check runout, you can’t chuck a deep well Snap on socket in a scroll chuck and zero it out for the most part


    Of course there’s exceptions to everything and this is a rather crude explanation and There’s more chuck types then potato chips out there

    If you was trying to center your test bar with a scroll chuck then I will pray for you lol cause that’s practically a waste of time.

    You need a 4 jaw INDEPENDENT chuck.

    As a hobbyist I HIGHLY suggest you avoid a 4 jaw Scroll chuck and make sure if your gonna get a 4 jaw it’s an independent chuck

  20. #274
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Man thanks for taking time for such a detailed post! i really need that info as i was struggling trying to figure out what to put in there, I was subscribing to the "any oil is better than no oil" method. I was about to put some high dollar QUincen synthetic compressor oil in it...buddy of mine had given me 2 buckets of it years ago. figured if it was goo enough for those fancy compressors we put a ton of hours on it would have been slick enough for the old lathe, but now i have some actual experience! thank you much

    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    I really and truly hate to bring up oils. It will no doubt start a sh$# storm of replies, lol.

    Here's what I can tell you. I do work in the commercial marine industry. Tugs and barges, and primarily in petroleum industry. I am not a chemist, but I do go into refineries and talk to wide range of people, and see a wide range of machinery and equipment. Some things I have learned, first and foremost: Any lube is better than NO LUBE, which is how I find many of these old machine shop machines, .

    Next, not just South Bend, but many machine shop machines, the recommended oils are generally based off a mineral oil. There are different grades of this mineral oil, but they evolve from the same place, or same material we'll say. The thinner of those oils we call spindle oil which has a viscosity of 10 @ 40C/104F. Moving up the scale in thickness, still mineral oil, a popular oil is Mobile DTE Heavy/Medium. It comes from the same processes, but it is rated 65 @ 40C/104F viscosity.

    Now a couple of funny things. A variety of machine shop machines, not just South Bend, recommend that Mobile DTE series directly, or it is now the modern equivalent. Its a little funny because mobile themselves call for its use in turbines and circulating systems:
    Mobil DTE™ Oil Named Series

    In a marine lube cross reference chart, also as turbine oil:
    http://www.shipserv.com/ShipServ/pag...0REFERENCE.pdf

    And one grade also listed as hydraulic oil, though from the same processes:
    Mobil DTE 24 hydraulic oil (5 Gal. Pail)

    I have gone through this a bit because I have other machines, an Oerlikon mill, and a recently acquired Monarch 61 series, that have more serious gear boxes. Both recommend DTE oils, but in examining them, the gears, bearings, clutches, forks, etc., its very simliar in design and spec to gear boxes I see in the marine field where they often use diesel engine oil as lube, 15w40. And those run a 100,000 hours easily under hard conditions, and hold spec.

    Anyway, spindle oil #6 10 @ 40c/104F:
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60002110

    Or Spindle oil #10 22 @ 40c/104F
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60002136

    Or Just an FYI, ATF is a very good grade synthetic Hydraulic oil is 30 @ 40c/104F.

    Mobile DTE heavy/medium:
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/00265462

    If you google a variety of ways, and include practical machinist in the search on oils, you will find a ton of threads and discussions. Some good links if you want to travel down that rabbit hole:
    DTE Numbered and DTE Named Oils - The differences explained

    what oil?

    mixing grades of oil, Mobil DTE light+ heavy, =medium?

    I bring all this up, because for you and your spindle, I'd go with a slightly loose tolerance as discussed .00125 to .0015". And a slighlty heavier oil, either spindle oil #10 22 @ 40C, or ATF which is 30 @ 40C.

  21. #275
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Again men, thanks for the detailed posts! yea after spending practically all day (going back and forth after stopping before i lost my mind) trying to dial in on that socket i was like there has got to be a better way! I'll be keeping my eyes out for a 4 jaw, got quite a few tools on the list! Sounds silly but i need to locate me a good tool box to keep al this stuff separate in, m other one is slap full anyway, and i don't want my Farmer cousins ( who are terribly rough on my tools) digging around trashing my indicators & etc..., and oddly tool boxes seem to be one of those things that everyone on ebay thing are made of gold?
    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Hey jmdriller41, I was reading back a few posts and thought I might comment on the chucks again.

    If you already know this then disregard but I thought I mention it. as I know it, theres 2 main types of chucks Your gonna worry about regardless of number of jaws, a (universal/scroll) chuck AND a INDEPENDENT chuck.

    The scroll chucks are “self centering” and all jaws move together to close at once on the part at the same time.

    And independent chucks where each jaw has its own “chuck key screw” to adjust them independently.

    And I agree with Texasgunsmith, going below .0015 is sketchy with that epoxy, I would let it work itself out and let the epoxy polish up from running before closing the clearance any.
    If your gonna use a scroll to check runout then you need to mount the test bar AND turn it down until it’s running true AND THEN you check runout, you can’t chuck a deep well Snap on socket in a scroll chuck and zero it out for the most part


    Of course there’s exceptions to everything and this is a rather crude explanation and There’s more chuck types then potato chips out there

    If you was trying to center your test bar with a scroll chuck then I will pray for you lol cause that’s practically a waste of time.

    You need a 4 jaw INDEPENDENT chuck.

    As a hobbyist I HIGHLY suggest you avoid a 4 jaw Scroll chuck and make sure if your gonna get a 4 jaw it’s an independent chuck

  22. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  23. #276
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Louisiana
    Posts
    132
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    I also didn't realize there was anything other than scroll chucks! i had seen youtube videos were guys were doing work on rectangular work, and i was like how the hell are they making that chuck do that?!
    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    Hey jmdriller41, I was reading back a few posts and thought I might comment on the chucks again.
    thanks again!

    If you already know this then disregard but I thought I mention it. as I know it, theres 2 main types of chucks Your gonna worry about regardless of number of jaws, a (universal/scroll) chuck AND a INDEPENDENT chuck.

    The scroll chucks are “self centering” and all jaws move together to close at once on the part at the same time.

    And independent chucks where each jaw has its own “chuck key screw” to adjust them independently.

    And I agree with Texasgunsmith, going below .0015 is sketchy with that epoxy, I would let it work itself out and let the epoxy polish up from running before closing the clearance any.
    If your gonna use a scroll to check runout then you need to mount the test bar AND turn it down until it’s running true AND THEN you check runout, you can’t chuck a deep well Snap on socket in a scroll chuck and zero it out for the most part


    Of course there’s exceptions to everything and this is a rather crude explanation and There’s more chuck types then potato chips out there

    If you was trying to center your test bar with a scroll chuck then I will pray for you lol cause that’s practically a waste of time.

    You need a 4 jaw INDEPENDENT chuck.

    As a hobbyist I HIGHLY suggest you avoid a 4 jaw Scroll chuck and make sure if your gonna get a 4 jaw it’s an independent chuck

  24. Likes Homebrewblob liked this post
  25. #277
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    248
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    158
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Haha I noticed you was talking about trying to zero on a socket using your scroll and I was like “that’s a waste of time!”

    Scrolls are good for work where your going to turn the part to size (allowing the part to be centered and true) and/or you need speed to pump parts out that [edit: may or may not] require the OD turned.

    I’m still looking for my 4 jaw independent too! I only have a 6 jaw scroll atm.

    And your right about flea-bay tool boxes, god help you if it’s got “Kennedy” anywhere on the box, you’ll need to remortgage your house!

  26. Likes texasgunsmith liked this post
  27. #278
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    927
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    482
    Likes (Received)
    290

    Default

    Aside from choosing your spindle oil, the Mobil DTE heavy/medium is not a terrible choice for everything else, apron, qcgb, ways etc. That's assuming you want to simplify how many oils you're using. Something in the sae 20w to sae 30w range.

  28. Likes jmdriller41 liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •