New guy here starting a refurb
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default New guy here starting a refurb

    New here, thanks for the add.
    I picked up a 1941 9c and it's been well taken care of. I'm not a machinest but have brought back to life a few '40s and '50s woodworking tools.
    I've been scouring the forum and have a question on the use of the scotch brite pads. Some say use them, some say dont use them on the ways and other mating surfaces. My machine hasent been used in over 20 years and the oil on the ways looks like it turned to varnish. It's not rust. Using wd40 and a grey scotch brite a small section cleaned right up after an overnight soaking in the wd40.
    After reading some say the scotch brite might leave an abrasive residue and others say use only non abrasive kitchen scrubbers, what's the opinion on those grey scotch brite pads. I've not had to be all that careful on old saw or drill press cast tables and such.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,162
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    658
    Likes (Received)
    892

    Default

    If it's just oil varnish use a degreaser (like 'greeze off') and some of the *blue* scotchrbite pads as they have no abrasive in them. Try not to get the degreaser on the paint... I haven't had any issues with it taking off the paint on more modern machines but better safe than sorry.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,050
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3387
    Likes (Received)
    3592

    Default

    I would not use Scotch bright on ways..Oil can turn ways dark like gun blue.
    For dials I use a fine flat file to just take the dent down to original surface and that is good enough... wanting them bright a fine abrasive paper.. Wire brush or scotch bright will round the edges of the numbers.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,722
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1535
    Likes (Received)
    1761

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul-Barber View Post
    New here, thanks for the add.
    I picked up a 1941 9c and it's been well taken care of. I'm not a machinest but have brought back to life a few '40s and '50s woodworking tools.
    I've been scouring the forum and have a question on the use of the scotch brite pads. Some say use them, some say dont use them on the ways and other mating surfaces. My machine hasent been used in over 20 years and the oil on the ways looks like it turned to varnish. It's not rust. Using wd40 and a grey scotch brite a small section cleaned right up after an overnight soaking in the wd40.
    After reading some say the scotch brite might leave an abrasive residue and others say use only non abrasive kitchen scrubbers, what's the opinion on those grey scotch brite pads. I've not had to be all that careful on old saw or drill press cast tables and such.
    Grey as in ultra-fine?
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/03356565

    I think you will be fine, just be sure to clean everything afterwards. I've regularly used maroon (very-fine) to clean things and never saw a problem.

  5. Likes DavidR8 liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    347
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    60

    Default

    Using an abrasive on your ways is a bad idea - especially since it's not necessary. The abrasive fines can get into the microstructure and remain, even after cleaning, so each time something goes over it, a tiny bit of metal is removed.

    Anyway, if what you are trying to remove is just old way oil, then chemical removal is the correct ticket. Try more powerful solvents, like kerosene, diesel, mineral spirits, etc. These should have no problem removing the decades old oil.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •