New-to-me 1934 South Bend 405 Workshop
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  1. #1
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    Default New-to-me 1934 South Bend 405 Workshop

    Hey all,

    I recently picked up a 9" South Bend lathe after selling my useless Crafstman 109, the seller originally posted it as a model 9A, but after I purchased it and got it home, I looked up the serial number and found out it was a 1934/35 model 405. I was a little disappointed as I've come to learn the 405 is a bit of a bastard child. But I am excited to have such an old machine, there's just something about owning and using such a cool piece of American history that really makes me proud to have it.
    The lathe didn't come with any change gears besides what was installed in it already, but it did come with a nice quick change tool post, a handful of bits and a sturdy home built table. For its age, its in good condition and runs true. For the work that I do, I'm not worried about not having the change gears as I don't think I'll be single point threading anything anytime soon. I picked it up for $400.

    I'm not sure what my plans are for it yet, I'd like change all the oil wicks and clean it up as much as possible. Not sure I want to repaint it yet as I'm just going to get it dirty again anyway.

    Does anyone know where I may be able to source new oil wicks for this machine? I found a kit for a 9A but I'm not sure if it'll work for this lathe.

    I'll post more pics a little later, I don't have any photos of it all set up in my shop yet.

    405.jpg

  2. #2
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    I believe that there was no use of wicks for that model. All they had was oil retaining felts, so almost any felt would work. The spindle is completely flow-thru as are most of the other oiling points (I can't remember any that aren't).

    Yes, it is an odd ball, but just look at it as the father of the more modern 9's. I believe that 1934 was the only year they made this model and was replaced by the model 415 in 1935.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by markd1124 View Post
    Hey all,

    I recently picked up a 9" South Bend lathe after selling my useless Crafstman 109, the seller originally posted it as a model 9A, but after I purchased it and got it home, I looked up the serial number and found out it was a 1934/35 model 405. I was a little disappointed as I've come to learn the 405 is a bit of a bastard child. But I am excited to have such an old machine, there's just something about owning and using such a cool piece of American history that really makes me proud to have it.
    The lathe didn't come with any change gears besides what was installed in it already, but it did come with a nice quick change tool post, a handful of bits and a sturdy home built table. For its age, its in good condition and runs true. For the work that I do, I'm not worried about not having the change gears as I don't think I'll be single point threading anything anytime soon. I picked it up for $400.

    I'm not sure what my plans are for it yet, I'd like change all the oil wicks and clean it up as much as possible. Not sure I want to repaint it yet as I'm just going to get it dirty again anyway.



    Does anyone know where I may be able to source new oil wicks for this machine? I found a kit for a 9A but I'm not sure if it'll work for this lathe.

    I'll post more pics a little later, I don't have any photos of it all set up in my shop yet.

    405.jpg
    I believe that is a 415, not a 405
    It has a reverse bracket and the tailstock is not open(from what I can tell from the photo)
    Ted

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    I believe that is a 415, not a 405
    It has a reverse bracket and the tailstock is not open(from what I can tell from the photo)
    Ted
    Nah the tailstock is open so you can get at the nut from either side, so its definitely a 405. I plan on taking some things apart to clean it up more this weekend being the wife is out of town and I finally have some free time on my hands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markd1124 View Post
    Nah the tailstock is open so you can get at the nut from either side, so its definitely a 405. I plan on taking some things apart to clean it up more this weekend being the wife is out of town and I finally have some free time on my hands.
    The headstock is not a 405. Perhaps it was swapped or the tailstock was...
    Is the thread of the leadscrew left-hand ???
    Ted

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    How can you tell the headstock isn't a 405? What gives it away?
    I'll look at it later to figure out if the leadscrew is a left hand or right hand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markd1124 View Post
    How can you tell the headstock isn't a 405? What gives it away?
    I'll look at it later to figure out if the leadscrew is a left hand or right hand.
    Your headstock has a reverse bracket, a 405 does not

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    Your headstock has a reverse bracket, a 405 does not
    Yeah, to reverse my 405 I had to install a separate stud and gear. Man, that makes having a 10L a dream.

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    Looks to be a turning gear laying there on the bench.How many teeth??

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    Quote Originally Posted by markd1124 View Post
    Hey all,

    I recently picked up a 9" South Bend lathe after selling my useless Crafstman 109, the seller originally posted it as a model 9A, but after I purchased it and got it home, I looked up the serial number and found out it was a 1934/35 model 405. I was a little disappointed as I've come to learn the 405 is a bit of a bastard child. But I am excited to have such an old machine, there's just something about owning and using such a cool piece of American history that really makes me proud to have it.
    The lathe didn't come with any change gears besides what was installed in it already, but it did come with a nice quick change tool post, a handful of bits and a sturdy home built table. For its age, its in good condition and runs true. For the work that I do, I'm not worried about not having the change gears as I don't think I'll be single point threading anything anytime soon. I picked it up for $400.

    I'm not sure what my plans are for it yet, I'd like change all the oil wicks and clean it up as much as possible. Not sure I want to repaint it yet as I'm just going to get it dirty again anyway.

    Does anyone know where I may be able to source new oil wicks for this machine? I found a kit for a 9A but I'm not sure if it'll work for this lathe.

    I'll post more pics a little later, I don't have any photos of it all set up in my shop yet.

    405.jpg
    Do not paint it as it may obscure what happened with the headstock. The machine is a rare find.
    I have a 1942 vintage B model workshop lathe with original paint (some of it is missing, needless to say but 30 wt turbine oil takes care of that.)The paint on yours looks like the paint on mine. just Leave it there for now.
    My machine was purchased by the Trident Metal Appliance Company at a NYC address. Not much info about those folks is available,Need I say more.There are scriber marks on the saddle where the cross slide is,so somebody was doing some repetitive work with it at one time.It is almost mint condition,nothing strange has happened to it.The serial card should reveal things about yours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by markd1124 View Post
    How can you tell the headstock isn't a 405? What gives it away?
    I'll look at it later to figure out if the leadscrew is a left hand or right hand.
    Welcome to the forums.
    First off, if It’s round, orange, fell from a tree, makes good juice and SBlatheman says it’s a zucchini THEN ITS A Zucchini!

    He’s got a reputation round here and I’d listen to what he says first

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  14. #12
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    Mark,did you ever get a look at the gear with the big holes in it? it Looks like a turning gear. If it is , it will give you finer feeds than would otherwise be possible.I have a 116 tooth one that can be used on my B model workshop lathe.


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