Paint Color For 1946 9" Model A
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  1. #1
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    Default Paint Color For 1946 9" Model A

    Dear Group:
    I'm doing another dismantling, cleanup, and repaint of my 9" Model A SB lathe. Frankly, I've grown tired of the same old light/dark gray lathe on a gray bench against a gray wall. Doing some image searches on this forum, I ran across this really sharp looking SB is what appears to be some kind of an opalescent blue.
    I'm not quite sure what model this lathe is, but would guess a heavy 10 (I'm sure to be wrong about that!).

    Does anyone have any information about this color and was this a standard color someone could order?

    Thanks in advance.

    i-twtltzh-l.jpg

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    Take the photo to a Benjamin Moore store and tell them you want that color in whatever suitable paint

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Dear Group:
    I'm doing another dismantling, cleanup, and repaint of my 9" Model A SB lathe. Frankly, I've grown tired of the same old light/dark gray lathe on a gray bench against a gray wall. Doing some image searches on this forum, I ran across this really sharp looking SB is what appears to be some kind of an opalescent blue.
    I'm not quite sure what model this lathe is, but would guess a heavy 10 (I'm sure to be wrong about that!).

    Does anyone have any information about this color and was this a standard color someone could order?

    Thanks in advance.

    i-twtltzh-l.jpg
    I suggest you paint it "Masculine Pink." See Keith Rucker's YouTube video at <YouTube> if you haven't already.

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    In the 1960's, you could get any color offered by most paint manufacturers. You could get one tone, two tone, three tone and even more. You just had to specify the paint number and manufacturer and what paint you wanted where.

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    I can tell you without doubt that South Bend never painted a lathe that color. Sometimes I wonder how so much energy can be devoted to the color of the machine. It machines the same whether it's safety orange, pink, black or blue. It's your lathe, paint it whatever color you want but did you get the lathe to be a display in your living room or to make stuff. If you make stuff, the paint will suffer rather badly so it really doesn't matter what color it is.

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    There was a very nice green John Oder showed us a few years ago. Brush painted if I remember right. It was an easy on the eye antique color. I have seen the photo posted several times on PM but haven’t seen it lately. Anyone know the photo I’m talking about?

    Here it is in post #173

    Hendey 14 by 6 Tie-Bar Rehab

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobermann View Post
    I can tell you without doubt that South Bend never painted a lathe that color. Sometimes I wonder how so much energy can be devoted to the color of the machine. It machines the same whether it's safety orange, pink, black or blue. It's your lathe, paint it whatever color you want but did you get the lathe to be a display in your living room or to make stuff. If you make stuff, the paint will suffer rather badly so it really doesn't matter what color it is.
    Thanks Doberman, you are correct that paint will eventually suffer from use. I use mine lightly just on hobby stuff. If I were doing production work, a 1946 SB lathe would be the wrong machine to use. Perhaps too much time on my hands and over-thinking this. But yes, living room would be okay with me. Here's a pic of my "shop"; lathe in far back wall.
    Thank you for responding.


    _pkm0935-copy.jpg

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    Pat Black's Hendey was a beauty thats for sure. There were other examples that were "japanned" that appealed to my eye, I wish now that I had saved the pictures. Dobermann sort of hit the nail on the head about painting it to suit yourself,if you like a certain look then why not? I think sometimes people get a little caught up in what is period correct or what hue the factory would have used on a certain date,which is fine,but when it comes down to it it is a machine tool,the paint was on it to keep it from rusting, not to help get parts done. I don't like gray, probably from my Navy days, but when it came time to paint my 10L my cheap nature won out because I had a can of it on hand and used it... (nice shop by the way, way too uncluttered for my disorganized mind,but certainly would be a great escape area) Jim

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    Thanks Jim; I agree.
    I was in the Navy myself; early 70's; NAS Alameda

    Believe me, this small space can get cluttered very easily (like with this lathe project), to the point where I can't walk around,
    which bugs me to no end. When it's a mess, I don't want to go out there, which defeats the purpose. Wish I had a small vertical mill.

    P Mc

    atlas-shaper.jpg

    lathe-shaper.jpg

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    Seabees for me.Also early 70's. Keep an eye for a Rockwell 21-100, not a large footprint,can be disassembled and moved part by part if necessary. A Burke Millrite would be another good choice, although a little larger. Jim

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    You are exactly right! My Dad had a 21-100 that I used all the time. He gave it away before I had a chance to put dibs on it.
    It was a really sweet machine and just the right size.
    There's one on eBay now, and the guy has cut the price 30%. If it weren't in Rhode Island, I'd go take a look at it. (I'm in Texas)
    Yes, I should keep my eyes open, they are out there.
    Thanks!

    rockwell-v-mill.jpg

    https://www.ebay.com/i/174104058158?...SABEgIKG_D_BwE

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Dear Group:
    I'm doing another dismantling, cleanup, and repaint of my 9" Model A SB lathe. Frankly, I've grown tired of the same old light/dark gray lathe on a gray bench against a gray wall. Doing some image searches on this forum, I ran across this really sharp looking SB is what appears to be some kind of an opalescent blue.
    I'm not quite sure what model this lathe is, but would guess a heavy 10 (I'm sure to be wrong about that!).

    Does anyone have any information about this color and was this a standard color someone could order?

    Thanks in advance.

    i-twtltzh-l.jpg
    You can probaly tip in a trace of blue and a bit of white and match that yerself off ignorant machine-tool grey.

    For more choices?

    Just wander through any major auto dealer's trade-in lot, a Walmart carpark or such, any medium sunny day. Note make and year of whatever colour lights yer fire, go online, get the paint code, and Ditzler or such will have it. Most need clearcoated as well.

    Or do as John suggested. B-M has stock colour charts - i picked their own "Chinaberry Red" as close to a '72 BMW in "Malaga" I was once fond of, and had them mix another gallon in "Rock Moss Green" from the formula posted "Right here, on PM" some years ago.

    Both are in their "Super Spec" single-component Alkyd industrial coatings line. They carry a primer in grey to match that chemistry,

    Easy stuff to use, serious durable, brushed, sprayed, or mini-rollered on, and unlike many of the usually toxic two-compoment exotics, it can be "spot" touched-up easily, later.

    It will "cross-link" faster if yah can "incubate" it a warming shelter, especially this time of year.

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    Might I suggest "new" CAT yellow...

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    Might I suggest "new" CAT yellow...
    Yuck. Reminds me of caring for diapered infants with digestive disorders...



    But I've seen a sort of butter or margerine "cream yellow" or "french vanilla" ice cream colour - intake side of the gastro-intestinal system, rather than exhaust end - show up right nicely on small machine tools. "Ivory" is another.

    How about desert food colours? Egg cream, Lemon Chiffon, Coconut cream, even Raspberry sorbet?

    "Pissed-AT-you, nut" pastel green or "mint" ice cream colour is another that is easier on the eyes than baby-poop/Osha green. Optical and dental industry use to use something like it before they went to mostly white.

    OTOH? I'm lazy enough to just run a roller of ignorant interior latex over the WALL back of it and change THAT colour now and then for "contrast".


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    Quote Originally Posted by mach2 View Post
    There was a very nice green John Oder showed us a few years ago. Brush painted if I remember right. It was an easy on the eye antique color. I have seen the photo posted several times on PM but haven’t seen it lately. Anyone know the photo I’m talking about?

    Here it is in post #173

    Hendey 14 by 6 Tie-Bar Rehab
    I have the "Rock Moss Green" formula on the gallon can lid - Benjamin-Moore "Super Spec" mix - if yah can't find it.

    Downside is it is a colour that doesn't SUIT just any-old thing - not even my Burke #4 restore.

    The OLD War Two, "war finish" Reliance motor housing for my '42 and '44 10EE, OTOH, it's a fair choice vs "moderm" Reliance green.

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    Okay thanks guys...I think! I went through about half of the "lathe pics" sticky, and there was every
    color of lathe imaginable...some looked good, others kinda strange for my tastes.
    But I get the point.

    PMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Okay thanks guys...I think! I went through about half of the "lathe pics" sticky, and there was every
    color of lathe imaginable

    Not YET, there ain't. But we are working on that....

    ...some looked good, others kinda strange for my tastes.
    But I get the point.
    Who you callin' "strange", odd-eyes?



    Dunno about South Bender tribal mores, but hafta figure more than a few Monarch 10EE have been painted a "personal choice" colour selected to send the message:

    "MY LATHE NOW, ... dammit! Just F**K OFF and pick yer OWN damned colour!"

    So we do....


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    its been years since i used Benjamin Moore products....its was good stuff when i did.
    i have very recently used Sherwin Williams All Surface enamel (oil base)
    and got fantastic results....flowed very well off a good quality natural bristle brush and ACTUALLY dried well enough to handle within 24hrs..wasnt overly aromatic either.

    do not be tempted to use a satin or low gloss paint....much of the qualties you want in a paint are related to the gloss...and after a very short time gloss will DEgloss almost to a satin anyway.
    i never use primer just straight to clean or even bare surface...never had an issue regarding adhesion or chipping......i always use two coats, the first one thinned about 10-20% (depending on temperature) the 2nd unthinned.
    YMMV.

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    Thanks. I ended up using the light gray Sherwin Williams oil enamel. I did use the Rustoleum spray primer after stripping and cleaning the bare metal (soap & water, then laq. thinner, then alcohol). Applied (brush) minimum of 3 coats of enamel. I plan on a couple coats of Rustoleum clear enamel too. Sure does make a difference in using good brushes! Thinning a good idea for 1st coat.

    But currently, I'm stripping all the paint off of the custom wood bench; have cut through 4 older coats so far. While I'm doing this messy
    job, I have all of the newly painted parts in a large enclosed box with a 75 watt bulb inside for heat. It keeps interior temp at about 110 degrees.
    Figure I'd leave these to cure hard until I'm ready for reassembly. Not in a hurry, but want to get this finished.

    PMc

    img_0413.jpg img_0434.jpg img_0436-2.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0425.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Thanks. I ended up using the light gray Sherwin Williams oil enamel. I did use the Rustoleum spray primer after stripping and cleaning the bare metal (soap & water, then laq. thinner, then alcohol). Applied (brush) minimum of 3 coats of enamel. I plan on a couple coats of Rustoleum clear enamel too. Sure does make a difference in using good brushes! Thinning a good idea for 1st coat.

    But currently, I'm stripping all the paint off of the custom wood bench; have cut through 4 older coats so far. While I'm doing this messy
    job, I have all of the newly painted parts in a large enclosed box with a 75 watt bulb inside for heat. It keeps interior temp at about 110 degrees.
    Figure I'd leave these to cure hard until I'm ready for reassembly. Not in a hurry, but want to get this finished.

    PMc

    img_0436-2.jpg
    South Bends should always be nicely kitted-out and painted.

    I won't never make then a Craven, nor even a Sheldon, but it kinda takes the STING out of it!



    As to refinisheg WOOD? Learnt how fast yah could build from scratch with native hardwoods, well seasoned. Or even cabinet-grade ply and decent veneers or laminates, teen-years.

    My way of messing with old paint and varnish, anything much less than serious-good solid hardwoods under?

    Fire-up the table saw.

    Trees just grow, after all.



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