Picked up my Grandfathers Heavy 10
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    Default Picked up my Grandfathers Heavy 10

    I just got back from a 2000 mile round-trip journey where I picked up my grandfathers Heavy 10. I vaguely remember watching him run it when I was about 4. He passed away when I was 5.

    One of my uncles had it for about 25 years and he decided he wasn't going to do anything with it so he gave it to his brother. He had it about 5 years and decided it would better off in my hands. I feel a great deal of responsibility to get it going again.

    I am excited to get started on it, but also I'm a little intimidated. All the levers and feeds move great. No noticeable play in the headstock. But I would like to go through it and clean, adjust, and lube everything. I replaced the power cable already since it had been damaged at some point in the last 30 years. Surprisingly it started right up and sounds smooth.

    This picture is after vacuuming the years of dust and dirt accumulation off, and already it looks much better. I soaked it in WD-40 so when I come back to it in a few days hopefully the dried up oil will come off easier. I plan on just cleaning it instead of fully restoring and painting it. For one I just don't have the time to get into all of that, and second I think its cool seeing all the chips, nicks, and scratches from years of use. Any tips on cleaning it without damaging the paint?

    This is my first lathe. I have always wanted one and I am excited to learn how to use it. I got a lot of attachments and tooling with it. Most of which I dont know what they are or how to use them. I added pics of things I dont how to identify. I suspect some of these are for a milling machine which he didn't have in his home shop. Can you guys identify any of these?

    I would like to add a quick change tool holder and DRO if possible. Is this achievable? If so where do I need to go for parts?



    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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    Congratulations, hope you put it to use. Do a google search for "How to Run a Lathe", its a SouthBend publication available online, hard copies can be found also if you prefer a paper version. Rebuild instructions and felt kits are available on ebay.

    Second pic is a boring bar holder, 5th pick is a milling attachment for the lathe, worth keeping but not real useable.

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    Quick change tool post (qctp) very achievable.

    Aloris style qctp come in sizes: axa, bxa, cxa, ca, and da.

    I think you need bxa, but maybe axa size.

    Aloris being american made is most expensive. But there are also copies and chinese brands running down to stupid cheap.

    To determin your size. remove current tool post. Measure directly from top of compound rest to centerline of spindle. Keep that number handy.

    Aloris website shows spec on tools. Bxa:
    Super-Precision Tool Post BXA

    Note dimension C in the pic.

    Now look at a tool holder dimension:
    Turning and Facing Holder BXA-1

    Top of Dimension D in this pic can only travel to a max of the top dimension C in tool post pic. Where your tool tip will be at a max of dimension A in this pic.

    So that is the max height, but it can go lower. You're matching that to the lathe centerline measurement you took.

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    I'm fascinated by the machine in the seconds last pic - I've been looking at it but I'm struggling. It seems like a holder to hold something at a precise angle, or rock between two angles...for sharpening a gouge chisel? Not even close probably. Or peeling potatoes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anatol View Post
    I'm fascinated by the machine in the seconds last pic - I've been looking at it but I'm struggling. It seems like a holder to hold something at a precise angle, or rock between two angles...for sharpening a gouge chisel? Not even close probably. Or peeling potatoes?
    My uncle says it is for silver soldering bandsaw blades together. I dont see how it works. I thought maybe someone here would know.

    Does anyone know anything about the L.Q.R and J.A.N stamps next to the serial number means?

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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    > My uncle says it is for silver soldering bandsaw blades together

    ok, that makes sense - getting them aligned in both planes is crucial. You'd clamp each end separately then use screws to align before soldering. I wonder if you'd scarf the blade ends?
    BTW - some big bandsaws came with a built in blade welder.
    I'm interested in such gizmos for historical reasons. I guess you wouldn't buy it unless you had to join such blades once a week or so. Not the sort of thing you'd see in a home shop.

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    Looks like it was setting for a time..

    Be sure the headstock is getting oil.
    Good to oil all the oil places and give bare metal oil rag wipe. there may even be an oil place at both ends of the motor so perhaps 4 drops each there.

    I would take a fine-tooth (good quality)flat-file and go over the bed to just remove all the high bugs and nicks, with not taking any from the original manufacture's original surfaces.

    Don't spray with spray solvents because that drives chips and dirt into works.
    Don't wire brush numbered dials.
    Do handpick away chips, and oil wipe all metal even the gears.
    A drip oil can is standard for that machine/not spray stuff.

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    First to buy/have.
    A set of used HSS tool bits off eBay. (so to understand tool bits)
    A tail drill chuck,
    Headstock chuck (I like a 4jaw)
    A center drill.
    A 60*center for your head and tail.
    A 60* thread fish and folding thread gauge.
    A digital caliper ($30 one good enough for starters)
    An indicator and way to hold it. (off eBay used is OK for starters)
    A set of HSS jobber drills can be handy. (Harbor freight set for starters OK.)
    Buy a few lathe dogs off eBay.
    A simple set of thread wires
    A magnifying loop.
    A one-inch micrometer. (Bargain $30 brand OK.)
    The book How to Run a Lathe.
    A simple bench grinder can be handy, and a simple drill press.

    The first project make a T handle tap wrench with having a 2” deep drilled hole at the but end, so to go on a shaft stub held in tor tail drill chuck. Make it with center a drill in both ends and running between centers for the practice.
    Next project a perfect measured screw thread. (with using your 3 wires.)
    Next a mild (soft) center for your headstock (starting with a between centers part.)This becomes your chuck tickle center. Yes, you have to cut/turn a perfect taper, that is why you do it between centers so you can check it and put it back in the machine with no change. I think a morris #3 at 602 per foot but you have to look that up so you know how to find information. So Machinery Handbook should go on your list(used off ebay Ok)

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    A simple lathe video
    Metal Lathe Basics Tutorial | How To Use A Metal Lathe - YouTube

    Tubalcain Videos are among the best for beginner lathe guys.

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    I would really encourage you to do a total teardown and replace felts. - unless you know this has been done recently.
    Why - good felts are crucial for lubrication.
    Speaking from (current) experience restoring a 10K: The ones I pulled out were all set solid with years of grime and gunk, some with a glittery surface like they's been sprinkled with party glitter (yikes!) .
    Note that in its many years, it has probably been lubricated with wrong oils that gum up felts, hold particles in suspension etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tallfreak View Post
    My uncle says it is for silver soldering bandsaw blades together. I dont see how it works. I thought maybe someone here would know.

    Does anyone know anything about the L.Q.R and J.A.N stamps next to the serial number means?

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    It's a bandsaw blade tooth setter. Should be a camshaft underneath and a place for a crank handle.

    For that rare someone that gives a hoot.
    The left adjustment raises or lowers the 2 flat shoes for diff. blade widths. Adj on right is sprung to open the "vise" that holds the blade. The yoke in the center rocks to and fro. It has a finger in each arm to set the tooth left or right. Uppermost is the driving pawl to advance the blade. All done with a camshaft under the tool.
    Last edited by Ray Behner; 08-03-2021 at 07:54 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anatol View Post
    I would really encourage you to do a total teardown and replace felts. - unless you know this has been done recently.
    Why - good felts are crucial for lubrication.
    Speaking from (current) experience restoring a 10K: The ones I pulled out were all set solid with years of grime and gunk, some with a glittery surface like they's been sprinkled with party glitter (yikes!) .
    Note that in its many years, it has probably been lubricated with wrong oils that gum up felts, hold particles in suspension etc.
    I'd agree, though op mentioned he does not have time.

    At the very least I'd highly recommend replacing spindle felts. Not as brutal as tearing down the machine. But the spindle is very crucial.

    Another very good upside to replacing spindle felts. You will be setting oil clearance and end thrust on spindle during assembly. The process of doing that, reading a dial indicator, doing checks, and checks, and checks. . . Is very much like setting up work to be turned. But you're doing it before you put power to the machine. Real good way to get acquainted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    First to buy/have.
    A set of used HSS tool bits off eBay. (so to understand tool bits)
    A tail drill chuck,
    Headstock chuck (I like a 4jaw)
    A center drill.
    A 60*center for your head and tail.
    A 60* thread fish and folding thread gauge.
    A digital caliper ($30 one good enough for starters)
    An indicator and way to hold it. (off eBay used is OK for starters)
    A set of HSS jobber drills can be handy. (Harbor freight set for starters OK.)
    Buy a few lathe dogs off eBay.
    A simple set of thread wires
    A magnifying loop.
    A one-inch micrometer. (Bargain $30 brand OK.)
    The book How to Run a Lathe.
    A simple bench grinder can be handy, and a simple drill press.

    The first project make a T handle tap wrench with having a 2” deep drilled hole at the but end, so to go on a shaft stub held in tor tail drill chuck. Make it with center a drill in both ends and running between centers for the practice.
    Next project a perfect measured screw thread. (with using your 3 wires.)
    Next a mild (soft) center for your headstock (starting with a between centers part.)This becomes your chuck tickle center. Yes, you have to cut/turn a perfect taper, that is why you do it between centers so you can check it and put it back in the machine with no change. I think a morris #3 at 602 per foot but you have to look that up so you know how to find information. So Machinery Handbook should go on your list(used off ebay Ok)
    I have most of what you listed already. The lathe came with probably 80+ HSS bits and lots of HSS stock along with some carbide bits and center drills. I have a 3 jaw and 4 jaw and about 20 colletts. I have a live center and a few dead centers. Not sure what it is called but a 3 jaw dead center. I will post more pictures when I get everything out and on my shelves.

    I have been watching machining videos including tubalcain for years although now that I have a lathe I will probably rewatch them since I have a way to apply that knowledge.

    I really appreciate the help, guys. I dont plan on running the lathe any more until I go through it and replace felts and clean and lube. It will probably take me a few months with my busy schedule these days.

    Does anyone know how to use the band saw tooth setter? I dont currently have a working bandsaw but I have a Rockwell wood cutter that I am going through and slowing down for metal cutting.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by tallfreak View Post

    Does anyone know how to use the band saw tooth setter? I dont currently have a working bandsaw but I have a Rockwell wood cutter that I am going through and slowing down for metal cutting.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
    This section gets traffic from a lot of folks, but for that tooth setter I'd post in the Antique section. People there tend to be more in tune with some stuff like that. Start a thread with some nice pics at different angles, it'll get some attention:
    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...y-and-history/

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    anyone know anything about the L.Q.R and J.A.N stamps
    J.A. N. is usually for Joint Army Navy - which I suppose was a government purchasing outfit

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    Kroil and a brass brush will take off old waxified oil and surface rust. Also leaves a protective film of oil behind.

    Grab yourself a rebuild kit off of E-bay. Well worth the money and you get a book, set of oils, new felts and a gasket for your apron sump. Ask the seller to kindly sort and label the felts for you - saves some hair pulling later.

    I use an 'AXA' brand (not size) multifix clone from Germany. Good quality and left enough money over after the fact for some nice Kennametal tool holders, plus inserts (compared to Aloris' pricing).

    Worth considering insert tooling to start off with. It is difficult to learn machining *and* tool grinding at the same time. If you get one wrong, you'll likely struggle with the other and not know which skill set is at fault. WNMGs, etc. make it simple and affordable at $1 per cutting edge. Then you can learn how to grind custom tools and will have the requisite background knowledge to tell what's cutting right and what isn't.

    Looking at about 50 to 80 hours to strip it completely down, clean it thoroughly and put it all back together. Can cut down on that by making a complete audit of every last specialty tool you're going to need and getting them all ordered in advance. Oddball outside pin wrenches, split screwdrivers, claw pullers, small hydraulic press, engine hoist and chains (if removing bed), etc.

    DRO conversions are possible, but will require drilling into castings and will (IMHO) irreversibly ruin the aesthetic of the machine and/or preclude the possibility of running a follower rest. DROs are handy but not strictly necessary for home shop machining. Especially on a machine old enough to have soft ways with some wear on them. Better to spend the money on a good set of metrology tools first. Brand-name digital calipers, quality indicators and a nice Noga holder, inside calipers, a micrometer or two and some sand paper*, etc. If I had to chose between the two, I'd put my hypothetical one and only DRO kit on a milling machine instead of my lathe.

    See this series here to decide if a DRO is right for you: Installing a DRO Pros DRO on a South Bend 13" Lathe Series: Part 1 - YouTube

    (* Sand paper emits abrasive residue, be sure to protect and wipe down your ways when precision polishing.)

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    This seems more like a setter, with having a crank and a spring-loaded hammer. Perhaps the lever on the backside of yours activates a press or hammed action. Perhaps turn yours around and take a photo on the other side.

    antique band saw tooth setter? - Bing

    There is nothing wrong with using inserts but in lathe work, there are special shapes that have no catalog inserts. So in my opinion one should have some cutting tool wisdom learned. Many problems with chatter, distortion, and surface finish are the result of poor cutting tool geometry(shape).

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    The time you spend now making sure that the places that need oil are getting oil will be well spent when you consider that the alternative is damaged spindle surfaces and worn out gears... you say you feel a responsibility to do it right, giving the old girl some new life's blood is the least you should do. (no flame here, just my opinion) Oh, and welcome to the forum if someone has not already said that. Jim

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    Speaking of gears, CRC extreme duty open gear and chain lube works well for the 'open' portions of the gear train. It's got moly and graphite... good stuff. Just make a test squirt on a paper towel first because it's messy. Makes those noisy straight-cut gears run a lot quieter after a few applications too.

    Soft/fine wire wheel on a bench grinder is good for cleaning gear teeth. Maybe grab two or three because you'll likely burn through them with the amount of cleaning that has to be done on these machines. Leather/canvas apron and close-fitting safety glasses/face shield strongly recommended so your eyes stay safe and laundry water doesn't come out black. Nothing like picking two dozen steel wires out of your suddenly filthy shirt.

    Looks like you might have a toolroom model on your hands too. Taper attachment is real handy if it turns out you want to pick up more antique machinery to work on later. Need a #9 B&S arbor? No problem!

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    I'd at the very least replace the spindle oiler wicks.
    BE SURE what you are doing before removing spindle caps to replace felts. You may have the bronze bearings with adjusters, or you may have the cast iron bearings with super-finished spindle. I'm thinking you might have the latter.
    If bronze bearings, You MUST remove the two small screws in each bearing cap before pulling the cap. All covered in HTRAL. If cast iron bearings, there will not be the two small screws in the center of each cap, you can remove the two large bolts and remove the cap.

    One other item, on the front of the bed casting, down below about where you have the tailstock in the photo, may be a small brass tag that says "This Machine Conforms to the (something) of the War Production Board" - meaning it's a war baby. My 1941 single tumbler 13 has the same JAN stamp and has this tag.

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