Reputable shop to restore Heavy 10 ways in Salt Lake City, Utah area?
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  1. #1
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    Default Reputable shop to restore Heavy 10 ways in Salt Lake City, Utah area?

    I was just given a Heavy 10 lathe from my grandfather. I've used it a few times for projects as a kid, and I'm very honored and excited to have it in my own garage now. There is a very noticeable stretch of a low spot near the chuck which I would assume is from wear in the most commonly utilized space on the ways over the last 50+ years. I can tighten the apron down and have it completely loose on that short section, but when I move it to the rear it will cinch down where it isn't nearly as worn.

    I've searched and read through some posts on this forum. It appears I need to have the bed ground and scraped to restore it get the best flatness/precision possible. I don't currently feel like enduring a learning curve of learning scraping on my own, and I don't have grinding equipment. I would really like to have this done right, and done right the first time.

    I'm located around Salt Lake City, Utah. Is there a shop anyone has used they would recommend, or someone who has experience and a good reputation for this kind of work?

    Thank you

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    you will probably have better luck in the reconditioning part of the forum.

  4. #3
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    Roberts Rebuilds – Rebuilder of metal working machinery does excellent work.
    Disclosure: I am friends with the owner and have seen a lot of their work.

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    There is more to it than to just grinding the bed. To do the job right it usually costs about $3,000 in labor. For that price you could buy another Heavy 10 with a harden bed and use the best parts from each for a rebuild.

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    As noted it will be expensive so don't worry about location, if the shipping is too expensive you'll never afford the actual rebuild.

    Seem to recall there was someone in the Kansas/Missouri area that was doing amazing Heavy 10 rebuilds. Can't recall where I heard that, maybe Richard King?

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    I would suggest taking that carriage lock test with a LARGE grain...any number of factors can contribute to it binding of which bed/saddle wear is only part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbo.USMC View Post
    I was just given a Heavy 10 lathe from my grandfather. I've used it a few times for projects as a kid, and I'm very honored and excited to have it in my own garage now....
    Just use it. You'll be surprised how much that won't affect your work.

  10. #8
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    Agreed, just clean it up and use it as-is, it will still make good parts. If you need "super" precision, you need a different lathe.

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  12. #9
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    Get out paper and pencil and draw a side view of the cutter touching the work.

    Simple...draw a circle and a horizontal line supported by a box.

    Bottom of box make an inverted v to represent the ways.

    Now focus on the circle representing your work

    The line is your cutting edge.

    Now vary the edge in verticle place up or down by say 0.050 and you see little difference in depth of cut.

    You can do some math to see but not that much.

    Yes it will be different than the unworn area but most of your work will usually be within the worn area so it will not change much.

    Long shaft different maybe.

    Just learn how to use it as is and look for a better one.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    this is his G'dad's lathe...I don't think he wants another one?

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    Yes, it might be Granddad's lathe but by the time he gets finished grinding/scraping the bed, re-fitting the headstock, carriage, QC gearbox, lead screw, and tailstock to the "new" bed, it won't really be Granddad's lathe, will it. I agree with the recommendation to use it and enjoy it as it is and look for a better SB or even a different lathe if extreme precision is the goal.

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  17. #12
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    Here's a graphic illustration of what bed wear does to a part's diameter. I used an,IMO, excessive amount of wear- .050"

    As you can see, it only really adds up on small parts.

    tool-drop.jpg

  18. #13
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    Thanks for the replies everyone. I believe if I'm being honest with myself, it probably won't be a real problem in the actual use it will see from me. I guess I just have a desire to make this thing as pristine as it can be, but it sounds like it may not be worth the headache and money it would require to re-work it.

  19. #14
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    You will be surprised how well a old lathe will work or cut with some TLC and some emery cloth and a file. I know Axel Fors and he's in Salt Lake City. I would suggest you do the dismantling, cleaning and have him plane the bed and cross slide and you do the rest. I can help you online, on the phone or you can attend one of my scraping classes sometime. Also one of my students might step and help if they live near you. A.W. Fors Machine Shop


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