South Bend 13, 1922
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  1. #1
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    Default South Bend 13, 1922

    I picked up a South Bend 13" lathe, 8' bed over the weekend. $1000 on Craigslist.

    S/N#: 27790, 1922 vintage.

    It appears to be a line shaft driven model. There is a 3HP Lima motor with 4 speed gearbox mounted on a casting over the headstock, belt driving the largest sheave. The motor can slide to interface other sheaves but with the gearbox, back gears and VFD this doesn't appear to be necessary.

    In what I would consider to be good shape given its age.

    I would appreciate help identifying the catalog number.

    A few pictures below. I'm mid-assembly as I'm cleaning and lubricating as I go. Should have the motor mounted tomorrow evening and will add picture of the full assembly.

    sbpartial.jpg

    sbserial.jpg

    sblima.jpg

    20190219_153142.jpg
    Last edited by hahnpv; 10-30-2019 at 09:57 PM.

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    Maybe a 65 like on page 4

    http://www.wswells.com/data/catalog/79JR/cat_79jr.pdf

    Series O in those days

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    One other question I have, the drive for the apron is a shaft with a single spline and no threads. The spline mates with a worm gear in the apron, which can drive power feed for both facing and turning operations. There are no threads on the spline and no half nut to be found.

    I'm assuming this configuration could cut at least coarse gears, if driven a single direction to account for backlash? Or did South Bend make models like this that aren't appropriate for threading? The oldest version of South Bend's "How To Run A Lathe" I can find only references splined screw shafts and using a half nut for threading.

    thanks
    philip

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    Default

    without the threaded leadscrew and halfnuts you wont be able to thread anything, you just have differnt feed rates.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hahnpv View Post
    There are no threads on the spline and no half nut to be found.
    I would say that your original leadscrew was replaced sometime over the years. Or, it could have been a special order lathe, setup for a single, simple process (but the QCGB seems to refute that).

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    Maybe helpful info from those long ago days

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf

    without the threaded leadscrew and halfnuts you wont be able to thread anything
    How true, at least in the normal single point threading lathe activity

    Is the QC gearbox chart marked with the usual available threads that can be cut, or is it a special, placarding only feed rates?

    The normal Series O QC gear box chart is on PDF page 94 in above link

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Maybe helpful info from those long ago days

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf



    How true, at least in the normal single point threading lathe activity

    Is the QC gearbox chart marked with the usual available threads that can be cut, or is it a special, placarding only feed rates?

    QC gearbox chart shows threads per inch:

    sbqcgb.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by hahnpv View Post
    QC gearbox chart shows threads per inch:

    sbqcgb.jpg
    I thought that machine looked too big to be a 13”
    It is a 16”, as shown by the index plate
    Ted

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    Quote Originally Posted by SBLatheman View Post
    I thought that machine looked too big to be a 13”
    It is a 16”, as shown by the index plate
    Ted
    The guy I bought it from insisted it was a 13, but I also noted the 16 stamped on the QCGB. Confirmed!

    What do you think about replacing the splined shaft with a leadscrew? I read another thread about buying leadscrew stock off the shelf and working the ends on the lathe. I'd have to scare up a half nut and lever as well.

    philip

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    Is that a 2.073 after LONGITUDINAL FEEDS?



    Quote Originally Posted by hahnpv View Post
    QC gearbox chart shows threads per inch:

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Is that a 2.073 after LONGITUDINAL FEEDS?
    Looks like it. I can take a closer look at home after work.

    philip

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    Quote Originally Posted by hahnpv View Post
    Looks like it. I can take a closer look at home after work.

    philip

    If so, that is a way to arrive at feeds, at least longitudinal

    Say you were set on 40 TPI.

    40 X 2.073 = 82.92 turns per inch (which is the antique way to refer to FEEDS)

    But....the reciprocal of 82.92 is 1/82.92 and that is .012" inches per revolution - the modern way to refer to feeds

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    If so, that is a way to arrive at feeds, at least longitudinal

    Say you were set on 40 TPI.

    40 X 2.073 = 82.92 turns per inch (which is the antique way to refer to FEEDS)

    But....the reciprocal of 82.92 is 1/82.92 and that is .012" inches per revolution - the modern way to refer to feeds
    Got it. Too bad it's not a whole number (2.000) that would have been more useful!

    philip


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