South Bend 16 Toolroom Lathe - The Adventure Begins... - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    I think it's time to consider a little self medicating....OCD is kicking in.

    Just kidding, whatever will be fine there short of a hammer and chisel...heck, that might even be ok although I cannot recommend it.

    That looks to be as fine condition SB of that vintage I have seen.

    Great score.
    Thanks so much! The more I time I spend with it the more I want to do right by it. The previous two civilian owners are a Japanese father and then went to his son who is now in his 70's. The son is a super skilled well rounded industrial equipment mechanic who took really good care of it. I am keeping my fingers crossed that there won't be any big surprises!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHook View Post
    Looks to be a twin to mine- right down to the gaudy yellow paint... does anyone know what the significance of the yellow was? Mine has much more yellow, was built in 1943, and is also a "war board" lathe, 183-E.
    Re color: I figured that the operations that it was setup for had some of the controls flagged with color. Maybe the ones you DO NOT TOUCH or the only ones you can! I am trying to find any pictures of where it may have been used. It has a Raritan Arsenal Bomb plate on the end of the casting with a number 58 on it and has a painted stencil on the headstock end with a 1008.

    condition_008.jpg

    cleaner_022.jpg

    It would be awesome to come across a picture like this where I could see my stencil!

    soldiers.jpg

  4. #23
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    Some more progress was made last night.

    cleaning_006.jpg

    cleaning_011.jpg

    cleaning_008.jpg

    cleaning_003.jpg

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    I just picked up a 16" x 8 SB so i will be watching this closely!! Good luck Kevin! Post lots of pictures

  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ETRem1 View Post
    I just picked up a 16" x 8 SB so i will be watching this closely!! Good luck Kevin! Post lots of pictures
    Good on you. I just read the lathe renovation guide that comes with some of the re-build kits and I need to take a deep breath and a second look because at first glance it did look a little overwhelming to follow all the steps in there! In the beginning somewhere it says the lathes need to be broken down every 7-10 years and freshened up with the kit parts! I am pretty sure this kind of regimen was not adhered to for the entire life of the tool. Maybe for the first 30 years of it's life when the military had it but I can't see a small island mechanic take their tool out of service to overhaul it! Which means that I probably really need to do the entire process which means that I am not using it!

    On the brighter side I was poking around a little more in the building where I found the lathe and found an older Wilton C2 Vise that I can also use in my garage/shop. That I can overhaul without a manual! It will also be useful to me going forward with the lathe but it would be way more fun to have a functional lathe to help restore a vise than the other way around!

  8. #26
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    Hi Kevin,

    You will not regret taking the lathe apart, and refitting it with new felts, etc. It may seem like a daunting task right now, but, step by step, it isn't all that hard.

    There are oiling points, that aren't that obvious, until you get things torn down. If I recall correctly, at the quick change gear box, there is an intermediate shaft, which has a slotted screw at each end, at both sides of the gear box. these are two oiling points. The shaft is end drilled, then cross-drilled to oil the shaft.

    In addition, at the front of the gear box, upper left corner, there should be a small oiling hole, connected to a brass tube. The sliding gear selector, has to be slid into the correct location, for this brass tube to deliver oil to the sliding gear selector's gear. On mine, this gear had froze to the shaft with rust, due to lack of lubrication. The NOS screw and feed selector chart that I purchased for my lathe, had the incorrect info on the gear selector placement for oiling, for my particular vintage of lathe, but if you have the original chart, you should be fine. Although, I would check to see that the tube is actually in place, and directing the oil to the gear.

    Brian

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Hi Kevin,

    You will not regret taking the lathe apart, and refitting it with new felts, etc. It may seem like a daunting task right now, but, step by step, it isn't all that hard.

    There are oiling points, that aren't that obvious, until you get things torn down. If I recall correctly, at the quick change gear box, there is an intermediate shaft, which has a slotted screw at each end, at both sides of the gear box. these are two oiling points. The shaft is end drilled, then cross-drilled to oil the shaft.

    In addition, at the front of the gear box, upper left corner, there should be a small oiling hole, connected to a brass tube. The sliding gear selector, has to be slid into the correct location, for this brass tube to deliver oil to the sliding gear selector's gear. On mine, this gear had froze to the shaft with rust, due to lack of lubrication. The NOS screw and feed selector chart that I purchased for my lathe, had the incorrect info on the gear selector placement for oiling, for my particular vintage of lathe, but if you have the original chart, you should be fine. Although, I would check to see that the tube is actually in place, and directing the oil to the gear.

    Brian
    Thanks for the encouragement! I actually read most of the restoration guide again last night and it didn't look as bad as the first pass. I will need to create the space to work orderly. Since bringing home the lathe and making room for it a lot of stuff is in the way!

  11. #28
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    The hardest part of a full teardown is managing the mountain of small parts. Do yourself a favor and order 20-30 thick plastic zip-loc bags right now. Get the thickest ones you can buy and label, label, label with small bags inside of bigger bags. You’ll thank yourself later, I promise!

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    Quote Originally Posted by thomasutley View Post
    The hardest part of a full teardown is managing the mountain of small parts. Do yourself a favor and order 20-30 thick plastic zip-loc bags right now. Get the thickest ones you can buy and label, label, label with small bags inside of bigger bags. You’ll thank yourself later, I promise!
    I am thinking one section at a time just to stay in control of my work space...we'll see how it goes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    I am thinking one section at a time just to stay in control of my work space...we'll see how it goes.
    You're smarter than you know. When I did mine, I broke the entire machine down thinking that way I could finish all the painting at once. In hindsight, I wish I had tackled each major subassembly on its own, including paint. Much more manageable than trying to document and remember what parts go where, especially fasteners and gears, many of which look similar but are not interchangeable. You're on the right track.

    When you get to the underdrive assembly, do yourself another favor and remove the motor and countershaft assembly from the bottom. Working through the access panel holes is not only difficult but a good way to break a part or pinch your hand. The 16" machine has a collar on the big pivot shaft that lets the countershaft assembly tilt for changing the belt. Make sure that setscrew is loose before trying to drive the pin out through the leg casting. Other than that one screw, the big taper pin that holds the 4-groove sheave to the countershaft itself can be a bear to get out. Carefully drill the center out of the pin from the small end to create about a 3/8" to 1/4" solid "bulkhead" near the far end of the pin. Driving against this bulkhead stretches the pin rather than compressing it driving it directly from the small end. Replacement taper pins are cheap, don't worry about trying to save it if it doesn't move after 2-3 solid blows.

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  17. #31
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    IDK- if this thing is running well I think the last thing I'd do is tear it all down....plus it looks way cool like it is.

    I would start with a clean/flush/oil and run first.

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    Looks possibly like the rather limited production Model 'N'. A super lathe. I have one also.

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    I have developed my own instruction sheets for the controls on this lathe if you would like a set. One diagram is for turning and facing. The second is for threading. This model ("N") is quite unique in setting up the controls since it is a single gearbox lever machine. Let me know if interested and I will provide them to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmbanwarth View Post
    I have developed my own instruction sheets for the controls on this lathe if you would like a set. One diagram is for turning and facing. The second is for threading. This model ("N") is quite unique in setting up the controls since it is a single gearbox lever machine. Let me know if interested and I will provide them to you.
    Oh my goodness yes I would love to have a look at anything that can help me understand it better and be productive.

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    it is for sure not an N series...it does not have the push/pull knob selector.
    it has the 3 position lever of the R/S/T series.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    IDK- if this thing is running well I think the last thing I'd do is tear it all down....plus it looks way cool like it is.

    I would start with a clean/flush/oil and run first.
    This is definitely on my mind after I get through a basic clean up! I bet the felts have not been changed in a coons age so I want to look at one of the big assembly's and see whats going on there and then form a plan around the rest of the tool. I like the way it looks too!

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    Congrats! I’m glad you got it. Just a word on the “scrubbing” process, I usually start with the least abrasive medium/process, so don’t start with scotchbrite!!! (That is quite abrasive)

    I start with;
    1) plastic pot scrubbers, plastic scrapers and rags,
    2) copper pot scrubbers, bronze wool,
    3)very careful use of steel scrapers and single edge razor blades on flat bare iron (keep a piece of 600-1000 superfine automotive finishing paper handy to touch up the scraper if you feel it start to dig in because it gets nicked), steel wool, and stainless pot scrubbers.

    Wasn’t sure about the “ not repainting” , BUT, seeing the stencil, well hell no!! Gotta save that and any other original markings, good on ya!

    It may seem daunting but don’t get overwhelmed, just keep making progress, just one step at a time gets you there.

    Ps, purple industrial degreaser is your friend, but it WILL attack paint.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    Congrats! I’m glad you got it. Just a word on the “scrubbing” process, I usually start with the least abrasive medium/process, so don’t start with scotchbrite!!! (That is quite abrasive)

    I start with;
    1) plastic pot scrubbers, plastic scrapers and rags,
    2) copper pot scrubbers, bronze wool,
    3)very careful use of steel scrapers and single edge razor blades on flat bare iron (keep a piece of 600-1000 superfine automotive finishing paper handy to touch up the scraper if you feel it start to dig in because it gets nicked), steel wool, and stainless pot scrubbers.

    Wasn’t sure about the “ not repainting” , BUT, seeing the stencil, well hell no!! Gotta save that and any other original markings, good on ya!

    It may seem daunting but don’t get overwhelmed, just keep making progress, just one step at a time gets you there.

    Ps, purple industrial degreaser is your friend, but it WILL attack paint.
    Thanks, all good stuff to consider. I have no time frame so no real rush but it's been just a little here and a little there. The pedestal area and under the headstock area remains but I am getting ready to hit that a panel at a time. Then on to seeing just what shape we are in!

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  28. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    it is for sure not an N series...it does not have the push/pull knob selector.
    it has the 3 position lever of the R/S/T series.
    I see now that you are correct. It is not an N series. So, my operating guide would not apply.

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    Kevin,
    As another member pointed out, I was incorrect and yours is not a Series "N", so my operating guide would not apply. Sorry.
    Dave


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