South Bend 16 Toolroom Lathe - The Adventure Begins... - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    Here is the main gear I got out of the assy. No felt was left in it but my main worry now is the rough surface. Can I use it if I clean up the ridges? I have a small surface table block I could clean up the face by rubbing this on some flat media paper or an oilstone but I dont know if that is ok. There appears to be an embedded chip in the face too. I haven't tried to remove it I wanted to get some advice here first. Thanks for any input or suggestions of how to proceed.

    Attachment 254157

    Attachment 254158

    The other side of this gear has some interesting features too.
    Has anyone seen marks like these on a gear? It's the outer most face of the assembly that mates with the keeper nut on the shaft. It looks intentional because of how uniform it is. Oil retention or damage? Maybe because the stuck chip on the other side and forcing it into the nut over time?

    Attachment 254159

    Attachment 254160
    The last couple pics, where you say keeper nut, there is a small gear that pushes on, in between gear in pic and keeper nut. Those marks are from that gear"s teeth. Note the pic I attached.

    As far as the galling on gear and assembly, well it is nearly 80 years old, haha. If it bothers you enough replace it. Keep in mind there is no oil pressure, just whatever someone squirted in during its life, or did not squirt in. It looks ugly, but if you take a flat file to both surfaces and remove any high spots, then it will be fine. The gear teeth are straight cut, so there is no forced side thrust. High spots removed, cleaned and lubed, it'll keep on working.

    What would be more of a concern is the internal I.D. and its mating shaft. Is it overly sloppy, or does it spin nice, and feel right ? When you lube and assemble you'll have a good idea if it feels right, or need to correct something.

    A link to my 16"
    South Bend No. 2-H Turret Lathe 16"x6' Restoration

    thomasutley's 16"
    1943 South Bend 16" x 60" Lathe Resurrection

    Both are pic heavy with a bunch of info.

    13.jpg

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  3. #62
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    yep, just stone to remove high spots/burrs.

    the "marks" on the outer face of the gear are just an artifact of the gear teeth from the gear that goes on top of it.

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  5. #63
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    Default First Gear Assembly Rebuild Complete!

    OK I made some progress finally! I had to source a shop press that was also very difficult to find out here. I have a small 1 ton arbor press that is not up to the task of pressing out shafts in this size of a machine. After much searching and daily scanning of the local Craigslist I decided to get a Napa Auto 12 ton shop press. Its a little more fancy than the old bottle jack H frame press that I had before I moved here. The one available on the island happened to be a kicked around the warehouse open box eyesore but the guy knocked 30% off of it so I took it. It had no oil in it, even though it shipped full originally but I got that all sorted and now I have some new capability in the garage. Plus it has the extra benefit of being scratched and beat up so "if" the wife takes notice of it and says, "Is that new?" I can say, "No, I have had that forever hun, look at how beat up it is!" lol

    I present the freshly felted and cleaned up reverse gear assembly!

    image002.jpg

    OK now it's on to that big banjo assembly!

    image001.jpg

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  7. #64
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    OK banjo done. I am looking at that quick change gear box and want to get it onto my workbench to go through it. The restoration guide would have me believe that I undo a couple bolts and slide it off with the lead screw attached! I don't see that happening, I hope there is another way. I am off to search for clues from others who have gone before me.

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    You do have to remove the gearbox with the leadscrew attached. There's not really a way to access the nut/s with the gearbox in place. Maybe just have an extra set of hands because the 14.5/16 gearbox is kinda heavy. Remove the gearbox bolts and slide everything to the left until the screw clears the apron.

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    single tumbler gearboxes fall into the category of-
    "if it ain't broke don't fix it"

    IMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    single tumbler gearboxes fall into the category of-
    "if it ain't broke don't fix it"

    IMHO.
    I like this but I do want to renew felts and clean it up!

  11. #68
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    Yes, there is a nut(s) holding the leadscrew in the gearbox....that is what racer meant.

    You might try a clean in place,with the top cover of the gearbox off pretty much all is accessible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    Yes, there is a nut(s) holding the leadscrew in the gearbox....that is what racer meant.

    You might try a clean in place,with the top cover of the gearbox off pretty much all is accessible.
    I read wrong thanks! I do see the double nuts in there holding the gear attached to the screw inside the box. There is a cast tool dish that sits on top but no opening under that...hmmm, I need to put some thinking into this. I might be easier to do if the apron is removed first. I dont have a lot of room on the gear end of the lathe.

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    For sure easier with the apron off, but do support that leadscrew!

    And be mindful of the key in the worm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrHook View Post
    Looks to be a twin to mine- right down to the gaudy yellow paint... does anyone know what the significance of the yellow was? Mine has much more yellow, was built in 1943, and is also a "war board" lathe, 183-E.
    Back in the 70's when I started as a printer I was told (adjustment handles were painted yellow) and (orange paint was for a warning of moving part)s. This may have been early OSHA rules or it could have been something adopted by the company I worked for.That was probably the first thing taught in training.

    I know osha wasn't around when these lathes were built but the yellow may have added later on.
    Last edited by mllud22; 04-23-2019 at 12:08 PM.

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    So I have been making small inroads to the lathe and still enjoying the work. Time for an update.
    I am working on the cross slide area and learned about a tool I had not been introduced to before.
    Adjustable "Pin" spanner wrench. I have used a "hook" version before but not the pin variety. My strap wrench is too large to follow the disassembly as it is laid out in the restoration guide so I took the opportunity to pick up a couple of new to me wrenches.

    image006.jpg

    Here's where I am now.

    image002.jpg

    I am stuck on how to get this split keeper "nut" off the screw for further take down. How have you guys done this? I saw a DIY tool made from a wood spade drill bit if there is a proper tool I would rather acquire it. HELP!

    image003.jpg

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    Default Kaboom!

    I bet some of these marks woke up a sleepy machinist! lol

    image010.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    So I have been making small inroads to the lathe and still enjoying the work. Time for an update.
    I am working on the cross slide area and learned about a tool I had not been introduced to before.
    Adjustable "Pin" spanner wrench. I have used a "hook" version before but not the pin variety. My strap wrench is too large to follow the disassembly as it is laid out in the restoration guide so I took the opportunity to pick up a couple of new to me wrenches.

    image006.jpg

    Here's where I am now.

    image002.jpg

    I am stuck on how to get this split keeper "nut" off the screw for further take down. How have you guys done this? I saw a DIY tool made from a wood spade drill bit if there is a proper tool I would rather acquire it. HELP!

    image003.jpg
    Take a good size screwdriver and grind the center away so the tip looks kinda like a "u" or "V". You can buy a tool on ebay but it is much quicker and cheaper just to make one. You'll need it every time you take apart a compound or crossfeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hsracer201 View Post
    Take a good size screwdriver and grind the center away so the tip looks kinda like a "u" or "V". You can buy a tool on ebay but it is much quicker and cheaper just to make one. You'll need it every time you take apart a compound or crossfeed.
    I don't know if I have ever seen a screwdriver that big! It needs to be probably 1/2 wide to start with. Hmmmmmmm. I think grinding away a cheap socket might be easier for me to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    I don't know if I have ever seen a screwdriver that big! It needs to be probably 1/2 wide to start with. Hmmmmmmm. I think grinding away a cheap socket might be easier for me to do.
    A chisel is another option, but a socket might work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hsracer201 View Post
    A chisel is another option, but a socket might work.
    Thanks, I couldn't find a throw away socket so I channeled my inner MacGyver!

    This worked...

    img_5903.jpg

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    Default Cross Feed Screw Source?

    Well I haven't figure out how to get the saddle off yet but I am looking right at the screw through the casting void and it is shot! I now know where that .10 backlash is coming from. It's not intuitively obvious how to take off the cross feed since I have a taper attachment on it too. I will scan the couple rebuild links that are up the page a bit to see if there is some good guidance for me.

    I am looking for a cross feed screw for a 16" tool room lathe. Anyone know of a source?

    I just found this guy on Ebay that is making them. Kinda pricey but if the quality is good I may need to go there. Does anyone know the maker? or can vouch for the quality?

    New Shop Made South Bend Lathe Lead Screws - Read Description Please | eBay

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    If your 16 is the same as others...the far end of the crossfeed screw should have two nuts. Remove them. The crossfeed screw is telescopic so it’s ready to come out once the taper attachment is unbolted from the lathe. You’ll see some bolts holding the TA body, remove them. Now the TA is only being held on by two dowel pins. Might have to tap everything with a rubber hammer but when it slides off the pins it’s free. Do not let the weight of it surprise you and cause you to drop it because that will bend your crossfeed screw. Slide the whole assembly backwards until you clear the screw and it’s off.

    All of this assumes that the compound and upper crosslide have already been removed, and the crossfeed nut is free. Your apron should be dropped before trying to move the crossfeed bushing/dial assembly by simply unscrewing it. Make sure the little Oiler set screws are backed out or they will drag on your threads coming out.

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  24. #80
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    I ended up ordering a replacement cross feed screw from the ebay link above and it should be in hand any day now. Thanks hsracer I moved forward with your help. FYI I had one nut on the far end of the screw. The nut has a rounded shoulder to keep people safe in a busy shop since it would be sticking out. I had to move the lathe away from the wall to slide the parts out the back too. I am slowly getting the rest of the assembly apart. Got the taper attachment off and discovered that the outrigger casting has a crack in it. I dont think that it will affect the use of the taper function but if someone knows differently please chime in. I am doubtful that I could ever find this part alone to replace mine! The crack starts at the vee way in the casting travels up over the shoulder.

    You can see it on the right side of the part here. This is the furthest from the head stock area of the taper assembly.

    cross10.jpg

    cross3.jpg


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