South Bend Shaper Restoration - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Feb 2014
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    NorthWest Mississippi
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    The oil lines were the easy part. 1/8 copper is used on "oil pressure" guages in cars and is available at most auto stores. Stick a damp waded up Tshirt in the top of the body of shaper. Wife gave me one of those Mini butane torches that Chefs use to melt sugar on deserts. It give a penpoint flame. Heat it up and pull to remove. While hot wipe quickly with damp rag to remove excess solder. Reflux only where you want to solder to stick and hit what you are going to stick the copper tube in and the little torch put the flame just on it. I replaced the one that oils the rocker arm in about 10 minutes.

  2. #22
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    Jun 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by drsorey View Post
    Brad,
    I bought a sb 7 shaper last week and am in the middle of the tear down. How did you remove those two large flat head screws holding the stroke adjustment plate to the bull gear without striping the slots? I was not going to do a full restore, but found my oil pump lever not working. It seems the previous owner didn't get the lever in the cam slot also.
    I have the same question about removing the flat head screws. Any answers? I was able to remove my taper pin and the cap screws but cant get the flat head screws out. I assume they need to come off to get the bull gear out. Any suggestionsimg_1036.jpgimg_1036.jpg?

  3. #23
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    They make these in a couple sizes. They don't slip. Give it a couple smacks with a hammer with the bit in the slot before turning.
    Get one that fits the slot well.
    31l-vjmaail.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Proto...YRYW5RWGZ6DT62


    Drag Link Socket | eBay

  4. Likes Chris Davis liked this post
  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    They make these in a couple sizes. They don't slip. Give it a couple smacks with a hammer with the bit in the slot before turning.
    Get one that fits the slot well.
    31l-vjmaail.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Proto...YRYW5RWGZ6DT62


    Drag Link Socket | eBay
    Thanks mllud22!! I had never heard of a Drag Link Socket but that is exactly what I need. Just ordered it.

  6. #25
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    Dec 2008
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    Fwiw standard tapered screwdriver tips were invented in hell and there only plus point is there easier and faster for the manufacturers to forge to shape. There designed with a taper to try to fit as many screw slots as possible and no thought is given to how well they might work.For anything that's tight and your expecting to not bugger up the screw slots they couldn't have been designed more poorly by a drunken orangutan. In use they apply all the torque at the very weakest point of the screw slot and the tapered design works to help cam out of the slot. The screwdrivers sharp edges when they don't fit the slot properly does even more damage.Most older guns and a lot of modern ones use quite a few of the slotted screws and gunsmiths have been dealing with them probably since the very first gun was invented. There's nothing wrong with that slotted screw head design, but the screwdriver tip needs to be parallel or hollow ground so it fits the screw slots full length, width and depth. With that almost any screw becomes fairly easy to remove. And buggered up screw slots are a sure sign on guns or machine tools that someone didn't know what's required. While expensive Brownells sell proper gunsmithing screwdrivers to measured sizes. BROWNELLS FIXED BLADE GUNSMITH'S SCREWDRIVERS™ | Brownells But machine tools likely have a lot of screw slots well outside the sizes there selling. At those much larger sizes milling your own from some decent steel that fit properly might not even need hardening for just a few screws. I've machined some larger ones that never got hardened and they work just fine. Add a hex on one end and drive them with a ratchet and socket.It's pretty eye opening just how much better a properly fitting screwdriver tip works compared to those tapered tips and there's little chance of damaging a hard to replace OEM screw.If your doing a fair amount of machine tool restoration making your own is well worth it. I'd guess all of South Bends machines combined might use less than a dozen different screw slot sizes. If your shop has heat treating and surface grinding capability's? Well you already know what to do with some tool steel.

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  8. #26
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    Little late to reply. But using a hand held impact driver can help as well. You can get that at an auto parts store for maybe $20. Hold it in your hand like a chisel. Hit it hard with a hammer, besides downward force, it creates a small loosening turn. Usually a 3/8 square end that you put your flat tip on, like a socket.

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