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  1. #41
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    I'm now sorry I asked that question, actually.
    I have a shaper and will use that to machine down the T-nut,
    if I decide on getting a QCTP. I was hoping a mfg can supply
    one ready to go out of the box. Guess not.

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    Hi Mac, I meant no offence when I suggested using the poor man's mill, it sort of comes down to using what you have to get it done. If you have a shaper I would think that actually would be a perfect machine to make a tee nut.(beats hacking and filing anyway...)

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    I was hoping a mfg can supply one ready to go out of the box. Guess not.
    That's because of the different dimensions of the tool post slot from different manufacturers. A Logan slot is different from a South Bend slot, which is different from an Atlas slot, etc. To deal with all these different sizes, the manufacturer says, "Here's a blank - machine it to fit your machine."

    +1 on using the shaper to machine your T-nut. It would be a quick and simple job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmm03 View Post
    Hi Mac, I meant no offence when I suggested using the poor man's mill, it sort of comes down to using what you have to get it done. If you have a shaper I would think that actually would be a perfect machine to make a tee nut.(beats hacking and filing anyway...)
    No problem...I should have mentioned the shaper to begin with...my bad.

    Thanks.

    PMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    I'm now sorry I asked that question, actually.
    I have a shaper and will use that to machine down the T-nut,
    if I decide on getting a QCTP. I was hoping a mfg can supply
    one ready to go out of the box.
    Guess not.
    Some actually DO.. for the really common lathes.

    But if you are chasing best price for the whole kit?

    Far wiser to expect to have to make - or at least alter one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Some actually DO.. for the really common lathes.

    But if you are chasing best price for the whole kit?

    Far wiser to expect to have to make - or at least alter one.

    Makes sense; I'd look for a good kit. Used would be
    okay too.

    Thanks.

    PMc

    wood-turn.jpg spinner-1.jpg spinner-2.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    spinner-2.jpg
    Good place for THAT item IS "mounted on WOOD"... instead to a chassis as needed a week's worth of fiddling and wrestling with the Devil and Lucas alleged-electricals to be able to drive for a few pleasant hours of a weekend.

    My nine "Coventry pattern" alloys and their Conti gummiwerke's for the 2005 X350 (XJ8-L) are a daily-driver, and less maintenance headache the past five years than the MOPAR "Car-a-van" has needed.

    Thank several billions of dollars worth of Ford's money and Jaguar's previously chronically under-funded brains playing "catch up" as fast as their vitamin-deficient little drawing-boards could be made to gallop for THAT much.

    Damned shame they got too close to the edge of this old flat Earth, tumbled off of it to make what now resemble standard-issue-white-gummy-bread Japanese DOOR STOPS!!!



    Then again, what would an alleged "steal" company from INJA know that Sir William Lyons did NOT know about pleasant "aesthetics", even back when far too many of the mechanicals UNDER them were borderline shite?


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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    I'm now sorry I asked that question, actually.
    I have a shaper and will use that to machine down the T-nut,
    if I decide on getting a QCTP. I was hoping a mfg can supply
    one ready to go out of the box. Guess not.
    there is a seller on Ebay that wants $17 for a t-nut for a SB10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeanMachine1980 View Post
    there is a seller on Ebay that wants $17 for a t-nut for a SB10
    Thanks; I took a look. Seem to be plenty available.

    PMc

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcload View Post
    Thanks; I took a look. Seem to be plenty available.

    PMc
    Well there yah have it. SB's are as common as housefly poop, so surely there WOULD be some third-party - or several - doin' that. There's a "market" for 'em.

    Only the scarcer lathes are... well... "scarcer" work for yah?


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    If the lathe in question has a 4-jaw chuck, you do not absolutely have to have a milling machine or shaper to make the "T" nut for a tool post. You can do it by machining a piece of bar stock to have the correct "neck" that stick up through the slot on the compound and machine the rest of the piece to some diameter greater than the width of the slot on the compound. You make the flange of this thing of a thickness that would fit into the compound slot. I'd suggest a 2" diameter by whatever height the slot in the compound is. You then mount this piece "crosswise" in the 4-jaw so you can machine away enough of the big flange, equally distributed so that the "nut" will slide into the compound and engage the hold down bolt for the tool post. Not as elegant perhaps as a milling machine project but just as functional,.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dobermann View Post
    If the lathe in question has a 4-jaw chuck, you do not absolutely have to have a milling machine or shaper to make the "T" nut for a tool post. You can do it by machining a piece of bar stock to have the correct "neck" that stick up through the slot on the compound and machine the rest of the piece to some diameter greater than the width of the slot on the compound. You make the flange of this thing of a thickness that would fit into the compound slot. I'd suggest a 2" diameter by whatever height the slot in the compound is. You then mount this piece "crosswise" in the 4-jaw so you can machine away enough of the big flange, equally distributed so that the "nut" will slide into the compound and engage the hold down bolt for the tool post. Not as elegant perhaps as a milling machine project but just as functional,.
    Yes, I saw a photo of this method of turning the T to round sections.
    I'm sure it probably works fine for all practical purposes, but I'm of a mind that the
    stress of the load on the compound should be spread to its entire surface area.
    It is after all, cast iron. I'm pretty sure I'd never be hogging out material to the
    point of breaking out the compound.

    Thanks for making the point tho. I'll keep it as an option.

    PMc

    ecu-armstrong-tool-clean-1.jpg

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    I'm shopping around for an Aloris or Dorian CA or CXA for a South Bend 16. While not South Bend specific I found this thread from 2011 comparing CA vs CXA:
    Aloris CXA or CA

    The main difference I gather is a CA is heavier and bulkier. And it can accommodate 1" tools.

    The CXA typically for 3/4" tools.

    Most of my tooling is 3/4" now. But my gut instinct is I like heavier more rigid stuff. So I am leaning toward CA.

    I was wondering if anyone had other thoughts or opinions I might be missing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    I'm shopping around for an Aloris or Dorian CA or CXA for a South Bend 16. While not South Bend specific I found this thread from 2011 comparing CA vs CXA:
    Aloris CXA or CA

    The main difference I gather is a CA is heavier and bulkier. And it can accommodate 1" tools.

    The CXA typically for 3/4" tools.

    Most of my tooling is 3/4" now. But my gut instinct is I like heavier more rigid stuff. So I am leaning toward CA.

    I was wondering if anyone had other thoughts or opinions I might be missing.
    Not possble to run out of advantage as to "rigid", so yazz.

    The other driver for my using large is heat transfer.

    Dunno if this applies to y'all using inserted carbides or not..

    ..but for HSS/Cobalt/Stellite?

    The greater the cross-section of a blank, the more heat it can conduct, and faster, away from the cutting edge.

    Larger section takes longer to touch-up grind, but "can" also last longer. The extra ridigity also extends tip life.

    So bigger is better on more than one metric, even if not by a lot, and "not always", depending on what is to be turned, the detail shape, and access to get the tool-tip "IN there".

    2CW And some 1 1/4" blanks ... even on 10" and 14" lathes.. Not limited by "QCTP's" here.

    "Quick change" is ability to swap out the entire toolpost, tooling intact. Not just a "holder".


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    The Chinese Multifix 40 position tool posts are pretty nice to have. They come in a variety of sizes.

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    While no expert on it, on researching around a bit, I think I may have some useful considerations for those looking.

    One, on T-nut machining. If you cut it close with a hacksaw or grinder, you could potentially fine tune it by using your lathe as a manual shaper. Using the lathe un-powered, if you use a drive plate or chuck to hold nut, set up cutting tool in current tool post to touch work at either 6 or 12 oclock, instead of 9 oclock. Run saddle back and forth by hand like a shaper. Increase depth of cut with crossfeed.

    Another consideration may be size. In general:
    AXA for 9 to 12" swing, or 6 to 12" depending what you read.
    BXA for 10 to 15" swing
    CXA for 13 to 18" swing
    CA for 14 to 20" swing
    DA for 17 to 48" swing, lol.

    However, I'd suggest not guessing. Measure from the top of compound rest to center line of spindle. Knowing that measurement you can look at the tool holder specs and determine if cutting edge of tool will fit at or below your spindle center line. If below you can adjust tool higher, to center line.

    But if tool would already be above center line, then you can't lower tool holder any further than face of compound rest.

    As part of consideration, I would choose the largest size tool post that can fit tool at or below your center line. Each successive size larger tool post can accommodate a larger size tool. By having the ability to use larger tools, besides your smaller tools, will increase your versatility. For my 16", I measure about 2 1/16" to center line:

    164.jpg

    As an example, I have a 16" swing SB. My consideration is CXA or the larger CA. For each respective tool post has holders for its size, some common number holders are 1 and 2, and 7 for a parting tool. So in checking my height I look up CA1, CA2, and CA7 parting tool. Using Aloris website to check toolholder specs:

    CA1, Dimension A shows 1 11/16", so that can fit inside my 2 1/16" center line height, thats good:

    165.jpg

    CA2, also 1 11/16"

    166.jpg

    CA7, 1 7/16":

    167.jpg

    And an extra large cut off tool, CA71. This comes close, but I'm still good as dimension A is 1 7/8"

    168.jpg

    As all the wedge type tool holders are based off the Aloris design, you can check your respective size tool holders to see how close the fit is.

    Aloris website to search your stuff:
    Order Online

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    For those interested and shopping around, Ajax Tool Supply is an online seller that has their own site, as well as selling on ebay. They sell Aloris, Dorian, Phase II, and economy chinese under their name Ajax. You can see here:

    Tool Post Aloris, Dorian

    What was most interesting to me is they currently have a sale on all their Aloris stuff. Just buying the Aloris tool post alone, and cherry picking what Aloris tool holders you want of ebay may be an interesting option, its kind of my plan, lol. Having some quality American made stuff will have decent resale value too:
    Aloris Tool Post

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    For those interested and shopping around, Ajax Tool Supply is an online seller that has their own site, as well as selling on ebay. They sell Aloris, Dorian, Phase II, and economy chinese under their name Ajax. You can see here:

    Tool Post Aloris, Dorian

    What was most interesting to me is they currently have a sale on all their Aloris stuff. Just buying the Aloris tool post alone, and cherry picking what Aloris tool holders you want of ebay may be an interesting option, its kind of my plan, lol. Having some quality American made stuff will have decent resale value too:
    Aloris Tool Post
    I got a cxa on my sb16 and I feel like the 3/4 tooling is plenty. I’m a novice but I don’t think our south bends are rigid enough To really utilize the 1 inch tools. And I feel the cxa is as big/thick of a tool post as I feel I want. So far I really like the cxa. But it’d be nice to play with a CA for comparison

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    I feel my 16 is pretty rigid, where we are lacking is horse power to spindle. We won't get 5hp or better to spindle to truly utilize all the strength of 1" tools. As spindle is belt driven, a larger motor won't do it either, belt will just slip.

    Where we can gain rigidity with larger tooling, is tooling extended further from tool post. A weird cut or something like a boring bar extended pretty far. The fatter the diameter of tooling the more stable it will be. But that's any machine, not just ours.

    For me it is in part shopping for good tools at cheaper prices. Right now I use mostly 3/4" tooling. So I shop for 3/4" and down sizes. Just like the dial indicators we discussed, I buy mostly used, but good name brands. So if I can add more options, I feel its worth it to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    We won't get 5hp or better to spindle to truly utilize all the strength of 1" tools. As spindle is belt driven, a larger motor won't do it either, belt will just slip
    7.5hp motor
    Sliver of rubber from a nascar race slick
    Some of that famous tire softener Jeff Gordon used to use and I bet I can get 5hp to my chuck!

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