Wartime 16 with cast steel or cast iron cross feed nut?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Wartime 16 with cast steel or cast iron cross feed nut?

    Guys I have begun cleaning up my WWII south bend 16. After removing the cross slide and compound I began working on the apron. Today I removed the cross feed screw/nut from the taper attachment and noticed something was different about the cross feed but. It was what looked to be a cast steel. My other wartime machine was earlier and had brass nuts and tags. This machine had sheet metal tags on the gear box and end of the lathe. The compound nut is brass. Do any of you know if this was common during this era to substitute a cast steel nut on the cross slide? Or was this common place on the larger swing lathes in general? Thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Traverse City, MI
    Posts
    3,282
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    69
    Likes (Received)
    109

    Default

    They were never made of cast steel or brass, only cast iron or bronze.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    California, Central Coast
    Posts
    2,037
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1872
    Likes (Received)
    663

    Default

    Most all copper was diverted to war, hence the steel pennies

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    766
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    845
    Likes (Received)
    516

    Default

    hrolen -

    My January 1945 Heavy 10 has cast iron for both the nuts. As well as steel data plates instead of brass.

    Dale

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,898
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2578
    Likes (Received)
    318

    Default

    Interesting. I think of steel penny’s they were used during WW2. Materials during wartime might mean using different materials I think?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,898
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2578
    Likes (Received)
    318

    Default

    We during war will adjust materials when we do not receive the ideal materials to do the job. Just considering wartime and the available materials available.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2