What do you do with a lathe now - Page 6
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 101 to 118 of 118
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    58
    Likes (Received)
    79

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    I use my machines to make parts for low-power horizontally-opposed engines!
    Now that's hilarious.

    I have a brother and uncle that are big Beamer fans but I'll stick with the Honda boxers.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Baltimore, Md.
    Posts
    1,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1149
    Likes (Received)
    530

    Default

    Seriously, there is some wierd mystique to owning a lathe, I just can't put my finger on it, but there is. the more exotic looking it is, the more mystique it has. I had this all of the way back to when I was a young kid.

    When I was a youngster I always wanted one of those little Unimat (God give me strength) lathes that I saw advertized in the back of Popular Mechanics. Thank God I never had the money to get one................

    As I got older the thought of owning a "real" lathe was way beyond my reach as machine tools (even used ones) were just too expensive to think about. Our neighbor had a little Craftsman, and I was fascinated to watch him make stuff on it. (He made many parts for me till he got too sick to do it anymore) There was just something kool about watching something getting turned down on a lathe. As time progressed on, older used machine tools became something the average Joe could afford to buy, and I was no exception. What was the first piece I got 30 years ago................A LATHE! ! ! ! ! ! !

    I have since been trading up and adding on since. Mills, shapers, grinders, etc are all kool, BUT THERE IS JUST SOMETHING ABOUT A LATHE! ! ! I have to admit, even if I dont have anything going on, I will still walk out to the shop and admire mine with that "warm and fuzzy feeling" in my gut!

    The thought of having 1 to use and 2 to fondle is interesting, but I don't have enough room.

    After having one for many years, the thought of not having one is unthinkable. I still have sellers remourse for selling my Barnes 13

    Frank

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Baltimore, Md.
    Posts
    1,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1149
    Likes (Received)
    530

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lazz View Post
    Several folks have mentioned their affection for their lathes.... But no one has mention naming their lathe.... So Ill start I have a Clausing 5914 named Irma... she is a sturdy girl.
    In evenings, on weekends or any other time I can sneak away to be with her she and I make parts for other machines. ...

    Yea, but.................I like my women built differently than my lathes. I like my women tall and lanky, but, I like my lathes short and beefy....................

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    66
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    My heartfelt sympathy to those with a space shortage! To only have "a" lathe is as inconceivable as not naming them!! I have Little Bend, Big Bend, and Blue Bend. "Blondie" might be a big girl, but sweet to me. I will probably name the Hendey that I got on Fleabay yesterday, just Hendey. Someday, he may be Little Hendey. Cincy mills, however, are Big Green and Big Blue and working on the rainbow. Trucks, of course, are size and color coded. That's Big Yellow in avatar.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The warm desert of Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    1,398
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    317
    Likes (Received)
    500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB3AHE View Post
    I like my lathes short and beefy....................

    hence the name Irma rather than Paris....

  6. Likes KB3AHE liked this post
  7. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Baltimore, Md.
    Posts
    1,025
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1149
    Likes (Received)
    530

    Default

    One point that I forgot........... Owning a lathe (and other machine tools) can tend to make you a "penny wise and pound foolish" cheapskate.

    My hand held shower head crapped out the other night. It was worn out after about 15 years of use. The war dept was pissing and moaning about it so I took it apart and had a lookie at the gutz..........

    I thought, I have some Delrin stock out in the shop so I'll make replacements for the worn out stuff.
    So............... after you figger what the delrin stock was worth, add in the cost of the K1 to run my torpedo (life support system for a cold night), and a couple hours of my time to make a few small parts probably wind up costing $50 or so.

    Now, an entire new hand-held shower head would have probably cost me $19.95............

  8. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Central Florida, USA
    Posts
    64
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KB3AHE View Post
    Seriously, there is some wierd mystique to owning a lathe, I just can't put my finger on it, but there is. the more exotic looking it is, the more mystique it has. I had this all of the way back to when I was a young kid.
    Frank
    I agree with you 100%. I like the so called LOVE bug. Its the metal bug and when it bites it can be hazardous to ones state of mind.
    Nelson Collar

  9. #108
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Very interesting read. Thanks for asking this question.
    Like a lot here I am getting into those golden years, and I am within a year of retiring.
    As I posted in my first post I was an MR in the Navy. I had taken all the machine shop classes in high school, and worked after school in a machine shop.
    After the Navy I went to the technical collage, and completed the machine tool operations course. In the midst of all this I ended up as a journeyman CNC machine tool rebuilder, which led to CNC machine tool maintenance, which led to working for the largest defense department contractor supporting their optical department. I reminisce thinking, all I ever really wanted to do was machine parts, make chips... WTH happened? I always loved the satisfaction of making something on a mill, and lathe. Of course I always dreamed of a small machine shop, and at this late time in my life I thought it would never happen. Then, unfortunately two years ago, a buddy got into a horrific head on collision, one dead in the other car, Woman on a cell phone dropped off the shoulder, and overcorrected. It is a miracle him and his wife are still alive. Talking on the phone he mentioned he was selling all his tools as he can no longer get around without excoriating pain. Sad thing for any guy to face. I new he had a chines lathe squirreled away he had never used, so I asked if he would be willing to sell it. He said, "I already traded it for transmission work I needed done on my truck". BUT I have this old lathe I picked up, and never did anything with. Boy was I surprised when we dug it out of the corner of his garage it was buried in. I looked at the tag, South Bend, Model 9A. After totally going though it I had the spindle turning last weekend. All is nice and smooth. I still have a few more things to take care of, and some tooling to purchase. My wife, and everyone looks at it and asks "what are you going to do with that"? Well... make things, fix things? You just don't understand? I have always thought that if I had a small lathe, and a mill I would advertise around the auto parts stores, farm stores, Craig's List to do small repairs, make small parts. Like everyone here has mentioned, something always needs fixing. I have no interest in getting rich. It would be nice to make enough to pay for some tooling. I hope I can still run it as well as I can in my head. I have a few simple little practice projects planed. Hopefully it will be like riding a bike. I have done a few simple things throughout the years on the mill and lathe, but nothing compared to my Navy days. Thanks for the inspiration. And like a few of you have mention, and surprising to me after all the big machines I have rebuilt, there is this surprising satisfying feeling I have from restoring it, thinking, how many guys have turned these dials?

  10. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Colorado
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    I am retired after a career as a Test Engineer for an Aerospace Company. I made test fixtures for many of our test labs around the country using a Bridgeport and a Harrison and Hardinge lathe. I bought a Bridgeport and a SB Heavy 10 a couple years ago and it is like learning to run a lathe all over again. I never had to grind HSS tool bits before or maintain a lathe. It has been a lot of fun. I am trying to pay for tooling by making parts for ranchers and farmers that have equipment that they can't get parts for anymore.

    I live on 40 acres in Salida, CO at the end of a dirt road with National Forest and BLM behind me. My neighbors are Big Horn Sheep, Elk, Antelope,Deer,and Cows.
    Life is good.

  11. Likes dalmatiangirl61, Stradbash liked this post
  12. #110
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    848
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    738
    Likes (Received)
    431

    Default

    I moved my shop to a small remote town that has not had a machine shop in over 40 years, neighbors all thought of a machine shop as a place that just makes parts for big mfrs. I've got a line of farmers and ranchers waiting for me to get set up, they understand the value of a machinist, the average person lives in a throw away world.

  13. Likes MetalCarnage, Kevin T liked this post
  14. #111
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin (from May to November); Florida (from November to May)
    Posts
    1,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    406

    Default

    dsc00651.jpgdsc00297.jpgdsc00296.jpgSince my earlier entries in this post, I have had some changes in attitude, and some strengthening in other former precepts. First,I have abandoned the moniker "Lord Byron", which I have come to understand as alluding to "poofterism", which I have come to detest. Another precept was to obtain the best example of a South Bend "Heavy 10", which I have done along with the obtaining of all pertinent attachments for this lathe. I have "mostly" completed a project on this lathe that nobody else has done. That project was a Winchester Signal Gun which fires 12 gage black powder shotgun shells. Why use 12 gage shells rather than 10 gage shells, you ask. It is because to gage shells are difficult to obtain. Also, 12 gage shells are just as loud and as smoky when fired. Also I can get them at CABELAS for about $25 per hundred with primers installed. What with black powder at about $25 a pound, it costs me $50 for a whole season of shooting off this cannon.
    The rest of the story was that I did not complete this cannon from parts that I made myself. I purchased the breech mechanism, which includes the locking bolt, hammer and spring from the person who has manufacturing rights to these parts. You can no longer purchase these parts anywhere. The most complex of these parts is the spring. I have devised a way to copy this spring, which will be machined from the solid out of stressproof steel. I will use my Microscribe digitizing arm to copy the contours of the spring, and will machine from a solid block of stressproof steel on my ATRUMP B3EC MILL equipped with a CENTROID control.
    The rest of the parts for the breech mechanism will be easy for me to copy. It goes without saying that I will end up with a whole new cannon complete with a stainless steel barrel and walnut carriage. Then I will have two. What to do with two?
    If you refer to my earlier posts on this subjects, I disparaged the climate in South Florida as not being condusive to the keeping of vintage machine tools. They will end up s a hunk of rust, which shows no respect to our manufacturing heritage. I don't think there is anyone that is a Florida native that knows his ass from a hole in the ground about machining. I have the background and certification to make this determination because I hold a valid standand lifetime teaching certificate in the Wisconsin Technical College system.
    I also assert that Florida drivers are asses with no insurance, and yes, I drive in the left lane whenever possible.
    Last edited by Bruce Nelson; 03-23-2019 at 03:50 PM.

  15. Likes dalmatiangirl61, 220swift liked this post
  16. #112
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    119

    Default

    You only left one thing out Bruce.

    GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

  17. #113
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin (from May to November); Florida (from November to May)
    Posts
    1,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    406

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erich View Post
    You only left one thing out Bruce.

    GET OFF MY LAWN!!!
    How does this apply to anything I have posted? I don't see the significance. Maybe it is that I am not from California. I don't know your thought processes.

  18. #114
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    moscow,ohio
    Posts
    5,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    551
    Likes (Received)
    1799

    Default

    He is joking about the obsession many Floridians have about their lawn.

    BTDT.


    Bruce, how bout some pics of that cannon? Looks like a neat project...I want to shoot clay pigeons with one.

  19. Likes DrHook liked this post
  20. #115
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    119

    Default

    I don't know, his rant included his thoughts on gays, the quality of Floridians machining knowledge and their driving abilities. Lastly he asserts he drives in the left lane presumably at exactly the speed limit.

    Sounds like an unhappy old man rant. what else to add but get off my lawn.

    And yes, as a Californian, it was the last one that really pushed my button.

  21. #116
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin (from May to November); Florida (from November to May)
    Posts
    1,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    406

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erich View Post
    I don't know, his rant included his thoughts on gays, the quality of Floridians machining knowledge and their driving abilities. Lastly he asserts he drives in the left lane presumably at exactly the speed limit.

    Sounds like an unhappy old man rant. what else to add but get off my lawn.

    And yes, as a Californian, it was the last one that really pushed my button.

    Thanks for the explanation; I now believe that I have a rudimentary understanding of your thought processes. Don't you have lawns in California? Possibly not.

  22. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    259
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    119

    Default

    Many in California do have lawns. They take a lot of water. Which does not fall freely from the sky very often. Although this past winter has been a refreshing change from that pattern.

    I do not have a lawn, I have a mix of drought tolerant shrubs, trees and ground cover with some gravel paths for contrast.

  23. #118
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin (from May to November); Florida (from November to May)
    Posts
    1,610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    406

    Default

    During the second world war, our family moved to California from 1942 to 1945. My Dad got a job in the shipbuilding industry in Richmond working for Kaiser. We first lived in a trailer court in Ceres, and later moved to Concord. My mother also got a job for Kaiser, and was able to commute to work with my Dad. One evening the ammunition dump and a ammunition ship blew up at Port Chicago, which was only about 12 miles from Concord where we lived, and I was able to see it. Several hundred were killed. I was about 7 years old. We drove out to California from Minnesota, and back to Minnesota in a Model A Ford, after the war ended. You can read about Port Chicago on the internet.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •