Whatsit - Odd lathe accessory
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  1. #1
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    Default Whatsit - Odd lathe accessory

    I picked up a War Production 9A this morning, Navy markings with a bucketful of tooling. Among it was the contraption pictured below. It looks period correct and the faint paint remnants appear to be SB gray. I cannot find a photo of it on any of the SB catalogs of the era.

    The two mounting bolt slots look like those a follow rest, and they match up with the follow rest mounting holes on the carriage. So positioned, it rotates over the work area. The cutter (?) is a knife-thin piece that lines up with the spindle, in line with the axis rather than across it like a cutting tool.

    Can anyone enlighten me on this?

    img_1712.jpgimg_1713.jpgimg_1714.jpg

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    It’s a mica undercutting tool for working on electrical motors.

    southbend accessory identification

    Hope this helps

    Ben

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    Yes,its for undercutting commutators of (mainly ,in the day) car and truck DC generators.....incidentally,generator commutators are always undercut,starter commutators are never undercut......possible exception may be Eclipse geared aircraft starters.....Larger DC motors generally had huge commutators,the same diameter as the armature to give long wear,and are well beyond the capacity of a small lathe......The other point is commutators are skimmed by the absolute bare minimum,as remaining wear potential reduces rapidly as diameter decreases.

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    Well, that makes sense. That had crossed my mind as I examined it, but I had never seen one. The orientation of that cutter is useless for anything else I can think of.

    I doubt these are in high demand today. I'll put it in a box with the armature chuck

    Thanks guys!

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    Might be in demand for collectors.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyphansen View Post
    Might be in demand for collectors.
    apparently. Or someone rebuilding antique motors and generators. One sold on ebay recently for $150

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