E3N-01 Kart lathe change gears
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    Default E3N-01 Kart lathe change gears

    I have recently aquired an E3N-01 lathe. Immaculate shape,tight screws and ways look brand new under slight surface rust from sitting. Unfortunately the machine came with only the metric change gears set up. And help finding what looks to be only one change gear needed for American threading would be greatly appreciated. Even the specs on this gear (pitch,tooth count etc) would be great. I have "dabbled" with gear cutting with success,so it is not out of my skill set to cut the needed replacement gear

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammer1092001 View Post
    I have recently aquired an E3N-01 lathe. Immaculate shape,tight screws and ways look brand new under slight surface rust from sitting. Unfortunately the machine came with only the metric change gears set up. And help finding what looks to be only one change gear needed for American threading would be greatly appreciated. Even the specs on this gear (pitch,tooth count etc) would be great. I have "dabbled" with gear cutting with success,so it is not out of my skill set to cut the needed replacement gear
    Do a little looking around the web and find the instructions for determining the DP (diametrical Pitch, the 'inches' measurement)or Module (Metric, pretty likely, given source) of your gears, by measuring the diameters and counting teeth.

    If they are not some gawdawful bastard size, then like as not, you can pick and choose from any gear supplier, or buy the cutters and make your own, as you see fit.

    Like as not, you will have to adapt the hubs to fit what you have, though you may get lucky, and the catalog lists the size and keyway that you need.

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    I can determine the pitch. That's the easy part. Just hoping someone may know more about these machines than I do or can find online,that may have the tooth count without all the math and ratio calculations. Thanks for the reply

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammer1092001 View Post
    I can determine the pitch. That's the easy part. Just hoping someone may know more about these machines than I do or can find online,that may have the tooth count without all the math and ratio calculations. Thanks for the reply
    No info re: tooth counts on the threading and feed data plate?

    Typically, you will find a pictograph showing the wheel tooth counts and arrangements either with the pitches table or inside the access cover that gets you to the headstock to gearbox gear train.

    A typical conversion set would be a 63 tooth gear, which make an imprecise but quite usable conversion, or a 100/127 gear set, which is as close as you can get to perfect, as far as tooth counts go, as 127 is half the 254 (25.4 mm in an inch)

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    Most likely it is Mod1.5 To determen that you can use the following formula
    Mod(Z+2)=OD in mm where Z is number of teeth
    The threading chart should be on the left side on the change gear box
    If that is missing the treading chart might be in the manual as well

    Peter

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    It has the chart with letters (a.b.c.d) designating the change gears. Had to count the teeth myself. Goes something like this. 24 tooth at spindle driving an 80 tooth idler which then drives a 127 tooth(standard metric tooth count gear). Connected to a input shaft to quick change box,out of quick change box via 48 tooth gear running a 40 tooth gear that drives lead screw. Thread chart show these as A (24 tooth) B (80 tooth) D (127 tooth) respectively. C is the missing link for imperial threading and does not show the tooth counts. As mentioned before,had to count each gear to get the above numbers

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    If you have a 127 tooth gear in your geartrain for metric threading you have a TPI leadscrew
    Perhaps it is a idea to do a wild guess and measure which pith you get turning at a certain setting Comparing the setting against the actual result make it possible to calculate the number of tooth for your missing gear
    Measure the TPI over a big as possible lenght to get accuracy up

    Peter

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    That was kinda where I was heading. The machine was in suck good shape I chose to strip it down and "restore" it. New paint,polish the ways. Just make it look as good as the shape it is in. When complete I will play with gears and threading(scratch passes) and see where it falls. It does have the cart inside the cover. Setup as it sits indicates it is set up for mm threading

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    Without a Manual, what are the odds that the "C" gear on the charts is simply an idler? In which case it could be any gear that fits.

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    That would be great. Maybe the 127 tooth for metric just gets moved into an idler position for imperial. Thanks for the suggestion. Will look into that when I get it going. If it will fit in that position.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammer1092001 View Post
    That would be great. Maybe the 127 tooth for metric just gets moved into an idler position for imperial. Thanks for the suggestion. Will look into that when I get it going. If it will fit in that position.
    So as to clarify, the sole purpose of an idler is generally to reverse the direction that the gear train turns the input end of the gear train, without being involved in any of the reduction/math. Pretty much every decent sized lathe I have dealt with, usually had a set of four or so gears that came with, that were used in various combos to get the proper feed ratios prior to the gearbox, when chasing the Module/DP/Inch/Metric feeds and threads.

    If your lathe is showing A,B,C,D columns, the likelihood is that there are at least a couple gears missing, unless some joker saw fit to try to fit them all in together, in which case you are really going to have a bad time of it.

    Were it mine, I would likely be chasing down any and every link that mentions that make and model, and see if I could get anyone to respond or talk to me, in order to find out the numbers.

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    A manual for you https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=547FE...%21164&o=OneUp

    Hope that works!

    Edit: It seem that the columns of numbers on your info plate are actually your tooth counts for the gears, with their positions referred to as a,b,c,d.

    Last page of the manual shows this.

    Somewhere near the middle, there is a page of specs and it appears to me that they are showing the gears as 1.25 Mod, but some quality time with an Optical Translation app on your phone may or may not square that away!

    Easy way to tell if the machine was inch or metric, look at the graduations on the feed knobs.

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    Thanks. I am "chasing threads" and have been fortunate enough to have found some great people willing to share information on this. Though google searching has proved less than bountiful on information. Fellow machinists with a greater knowledge have been very helpful.

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    Feed knobs show metric and imperial markings. Which would suggest to me it was intended for use in the U.S. though still equipped with a non traditional (by U.S. standards)550v motor

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    Luckily I have a fwd/rev lever for feed. So if the idler solves the gear ratio issue for threading,I can correct feed direction with the flip of a lever

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammer1092001 View Post
    Feed knobs show metric and imperial markings. Which would suggest to me it was intended for use in the U.S. though still equipped with a non traditional (by U.S. standards)550v motor
    "575" or "600 volt" is sort of an old standard in the North East USofA.
    Canaduh still uses it, these days, most xformers to work with it come from there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hammer1092001 View Post
    Thanks. I am "chasing threads" and have been fortunate enough to have found some great people willing to share information on this. Though google searching has proved less than bountiful on information. Fellow machinists with a greater knowledge have been very helpful.
    Did you download that manual?
    It was posted on an Italian (IIRC) Forum that was in the first page of Google search results.

    It's in Hungarian, but if you print it out, you can get a lot of info from it, and the scan and translate Apps for a phone work to sort out an even better set of details.

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    I did ty. After more cleaning and another look. I did find the gear/tooth count needed. Machine has a 6 tpi lead screw. Gears I need for standard thread range are 30t,60t,92t and 96t. To do full range of metric I would need 48t,60t,64t,95t,and 96t. With some interchanging of those numbers between std,metric and module chart with no duplicates. I was expecting that being a European machine it may have module gears (and may have if I miscalculated). I measured all gears and came out within a few thou of 20dp I will use the 80 tooth as an example. 80+2 = 82 ÷ 4.032(outside diameter) = 20.337. Throw away the change and I get 20dp. I will admit I am more familiar with diametral pitch than module. Am I safe assuming it IS 20dp? Or is there a module that would be close enough to mislead me?

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    Similar - Peter from across the pond posted this recently. Sounds real close to 1.25 Module

    Most likely it is Mod1.5 To determen that you can use the following formula
    Mod(Z+2)=OD in mm where Z is number of teeth
    The threading chart should be on the left side on the change gear box
    If that is missing the treading chart might be in the manual as well

    Peter

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    Modul is a metric system So you should messure in mm
    4.032inch is 102,4mm If I make that 102.5 you get 102.5 /82=1.25 So you have Mod1.25 gears
    Bad luck for you as these are harder to get

    Peter


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