Inherited some machine tools - Now what? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottcarter87 View Post
    Do I run the risk of negatively affecting the tolerances of the machine by disassembling and re-assembling?
    I would not dismantle the lathe, far too much hassle and there really is no need with something that small and light. Get a friend to help lift or an engine hoist. I have an engine hoist that I've used for lifting stuff larger and heavier than that lathe.

    For the Bridgeport look into tow trucks , the ones with the boom, and see if they will unload it for you. I have used such a tow truck service many times, to lift all manner of machine tools out of the bed of my pickup, with the heaviest being 2,400lbs. It is the least expensive option for me, less expensive than renting a Triple L drop deck . You could also look into SunBelt and other rental places and ask if they have a Triple L drop deck trailer.

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  3. #22
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    to get it out of a basement, it most likely already was taken apart.
    just need to set it all when it goes back together or it will be sloppy and move when you dont want it to.

  4. #23
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    Nice lathe. It'll serve you well. Too bad it was taken apart and the cabinet laid on its side. Coulda been set on the trailer as was, rolled off the trailer and into place in one piece, but it's done now. It can be done differently next time.

    My advice, FWIW. Back the trailer up to the walkin door, take those metal ramps off if they can't fit through the door, get a piece of plywood under the lathe, get it to the back of the trailer, maybe with aforementioned 1/2" pipes, tip the front of the trailer up, restrain the lathe with a comealong, and roll it down a couple 2x planks to your floor. That or get a couple friends and carry it. Prob simplest, since it'll need to be picked up and set on the cabinet.

    Tip the cabinet upright (with trailer deck flat) and roll it down the planks, restrained, into the basement. Tipping the trailer to roll the cabinet will eliminate or reduce the "hump" between the trailer and the 2x ramps.

    Reconsider putting the Bridgeport in the garage. There'll be many times when you'll need to move a part from the lathe to the mill and vice versa, not to mention that your measuring tools should live in the (dehumidified) basement. Gets frustrating having to traipse from one building to another for a mic or caliper, only to find you need another. If your lathe cabinet will go through your basement door, the Bridgeport will too.

    I'd suggest a relative humidity meter posted at the lathe, too. Watch it like a hawk. While a heat pump water heater does dehumidify a basement, it's not controlled to run when the RH gets hi. Rusty anything is a totally avoidable loss.

    Good luck with your lathe move. Let us know before you move your bridgeport.

  5. #24
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    I would not take the headstock off the lathe bed. Too finicky to get it realigned. If you remove the apron as recommended it may make it too heavy at one end and harder to move? Folks use an automotive serpentine belt laced around the pulleys rather then the original leather. HTRAL has lacing instructions.
    The BP weighs about 2200 pounds. Each piece weighs about 200 pounds with the base casting being around 600 pounds with no knee, table or turret attached.
    Look for the free online USA army training manuals for lathes and vertical milling machines.
    Caution: now that you have a lathe any round piece of metal is worth saving. Now that you own a mill any square or flat piece of metal is worth saving. I go to barn sales just to buy the pile of metal pieces in the corner.
    Bill D

    US Army courses | Open Source Machine

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottcarter87 View Post
    Do I run the risk of negatively affecting the tolerances of the machine by disassembling and re-assembling?
    No. It all goes back together in only one way. The advice is good. The bench is the single largest, heaviest item you will have to deal with.

    Remove the following items from the machine:

    headstock
    tailstock
    carriage.
    quick change gearbox with lead screw attached. (TAPE THE LEAD SCREW AND GEARBOX TO A 2x4 once it's off the machine)

    Two people can move the bed by itself without problems. While the machine is apart, before you re-assemble, clean and inspect.

    The underneath motor drive is bolted into the base and you can substantially lighten the base by removing the motor and drive unit together.

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    Why in the heck is this in the for sale forum now?!

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    You didn't say whether the belt was flat or vee.

    I made a jig to skive a flat leather belt and glued it in place on my last South Bend. With essentially no joint, it ran quietly, at least until the headstock gears got involved. But external gear trains like that are always going to be noisy.

    How To Run A Lathe. Check. Local machining class. Check. Find out if you have a local metalworking club.

    My best advice for you is don't start buying every accessory known to man for your lathe. Use your lathe. Learn to oil it and oil it every day you use it. If your grandpa didn't have a bunch of cool vintage oil cans just keep looking around. Use 30 weight (10 if you can get it) nondetergent motor oil available at NAPA for spindle oil. Buy a gallon of Mobil Vactra no. 2 way oil from - oh, gosh, I was going to say Enco! Anyway, buy it somewhere.

    Keep posting questions. But South Bend lathes are not considered pro gear on many of the PM forums, so you might want to look for a South Bend forum if practicalmachinist has one.

    metalmagpie

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    No. It all goes back together in only one way. The advice is good. The bench is the single largest, heaviest item you will have to deal with.

    Remove the following items from the machine:

    headstock
    tailstock
    carriage.
    quick change gearbox with lead screw attached. (TAPE THE LEAD SCREW AND GEARBOX TO A 2x4 once it's off the machine)

    Two people can move the bed by itself without problems. While the machine is apart, before you re-assemble, clean and inspect.

    The underneath motor drive is bolted into the base and you can substantially lighten the base by removing the motor and drive unit together.
    Lotta extra work taking the lathe apart and putting it back together when it isn't necessary. Moving heavy objects is a useful skill for a machinist - rolling things on 1/2" pipes is pretty quick and easy. Machinery moving 101, preparing him for moving the B'port.

    At this rate, he'll get the damn thing turning in a couple years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Lotta extra work taking the lathe apart and putting it back together when it isn't necessary.....
    Goes fast if you've done it a few times. Every lathe I've ever bought came apart to get into my shop, and every time I caught some details that needed cleaning up. Go look at the SB forum to see what happens when you try to move one in one chunk, and and winds up in many chunks anyway!

    Think of the dismantling process as a 'getting to know you' kind of event, especially useful for newcomers to the activity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Nice lathe. It'll serve you well. Too bad it was taken apart and the cabinet laid on its side. Coulda been set on the trailer as was, rolled off the trailer and into place in one piece, but it's done now. It can be done differently next time.

    My advice, FWIW. Back the trailer up to the walkin door, take those metal ramps off if they can't fit through the door, get a piece of plywood under the lathe, get it to the back of the trailer, maybe with aforementioned 1/2" pipes, tip the front of the trailer up, restrain the lathe with a comealong, and roll it down a couple 2x planks to your floor. That or get a couple friends and carry it. Prob simplest, since it'll need to be picked up and set on the cabinet.

    Tip the cabinet upright (with trailer deck flat) and roll it down the planks, restrained, into the basement. Tipping the trailer to roll the cabinet will eliminate or reduce the "hump" between the trailer and the 2x ramps.

    Reconsider putting the Bridgeport in the garage. There'll be many times when you'll need to move a part from the lathe to the mill and vice versa, not to mention that your measuring tools should live in the (dehumidified) basement. Gets frustrating having to traipse from one building to another for a mic or caliper, only to find you need another. If your lathe cabinet will go through your basement door, the Bridgeport will too.

    I'd suggest a relative humidity meter posted at the lathe, too. Watch it like a hawk. While a heat pump water heater does dehumidify a basement, it's not controlled to run when the RH gets hi. Rusty anything is a totally avoidable loss.

    Good luck with your lathe move. Let us know before you move your bridgeport.
    Unfortunately the mill is going to have to stay in the garage. My wife has a gym in the basement and we also plan to finish it at some point too. There simply isn't enough room for the lathe, mill, and gym to co-exist in the basement when its finished. I'd rather not struggle to get the mill down there just to have to get it out of there a few years later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Why in the heck is this in the for sale forum now?!
    I'm not sure. Maybe the admins moved it? I certainly didn't

  17. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Lotta extra work taking the lathe apart and putting it back together when it isn't necessary. Moving heavy objects is a useful skill for a machinist - rolling things on 1/2" pipes is pretty quick and easy. Machinery moving 101, preparing him for moving the B'port.

    At this rate, he'll get the damn thing turning in a couple years.
    That was kind of my thought. Seems like a can of worms to take the whole thing apart at this point. I really want to get it setup and start making chips but if I take it all apart I may be heading down a slippery slope. My grandfather was using the machine right up until he passed away so although its a bit dirty everything should be in working order and aligned as it sits. Might be a good project down the road to take it apart and clean it up real good but for now it seems like it makes more sense to just get it setup and use it.

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    I just heard from my grandmother that a rigger is going to buy the other machine (Clausing Kondia) and he will handle the extraction of both machines from the basement which is going to be the hardest part. They said they would be able to drop the mill onto a heavy duty pallet for me and then I am thinking of just renting a drop deck trailer and a pallet jack to go pick it up. I'll have to figure out how to get it off the pallet when I get it home but I am pleased that I won't have to pay the riggers for the extraction of the machine.

    I was doing a little research on the mill and came across this leveling kit that I am thinking of buying. I like the idea of having the base of the machine up off the floor so that in the event that I do need to move the machine I can do so with a pallet jack. The mill has a shaper attachment on the back and if I put the mill in the back corner of my garage like I plan (so that I can still park a car in there) I will need the ability to pull it away from the wall to spin the turret to use the shaper.

    Any thoughts on this kit? Does anybody know of a kit that would use some heavy duty casters? It would be nice to not have to buy a pallet jack if posible.

    Bridgeport Milling Machine Leveling Feet

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    seems like a lot of money for what it is. I built a riser base for my mill (about 1/2 the weight of yours) that has casters and jacking feet. Mostly to get the mill higher as I'm pretty tall, but it's been handy to get the mill mostly level (so things don't roll of the table) on an uneven floor and I've repositioned it a couple of times. Cost about $50 for the steel (2x3x1/8 tubing and 1/4" plate) and bolts (no welder), and I reused the original feet and 4 casters from a 1000lb HF dolly.

    Not sure I'd want to have to drag a mill out to use it though, it's a bit of a faff to use the jacks. I'd have a good look at your garage layout and the mill when you get it, see if you can find a position where you can swing the head to use the slotter without moving the mill.

    I'm sure your grandpa would be smiling if he could read this

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottcarter87 View Post
    ...Seems like a can of worms to take the whole thing apart at this point. ...
    If this is going down a bilco door to a basement, or down a full flight of steps, hire a local rigger to do the job. If it's going into
    a space at grade then this might work.

    Lathes are top heavy. You can tip one over off of dollies, onto its face, in a heartbeat. If anyone gets hurt moving it down a
    set of stairs, that's a trip to the ER. You can hire a LOT of riggers for a cost of an ER visit.

    Go look at the 10L that was shipped and dropped on its face. Your grandfather's machine does not deserve that fate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post

    Go look at the 10L that was shipped and dropped on its face. Your grandfather's machine does not deserve that fate.
    Here is a link to that thread:
    South bend heavy 10 fixable?

  22. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Goes fast if you've done it a few times.
    He hasn't done it a few times, Jim. And while he's at it, by those standards, maybe he should just completely disassemble it like Walter Chrysler did his first car. Except he ain't Walter Chrysler. Come on, give the guy a friggin' break.

    ...Every lathe I've ever bought came apart to get into my shop, and every time I caught some details that needed cleaning up.
    And you ain't him, to quote Bob.

    ...Go look at the SB forum to see what happens when you try to move one in one chunk, and and winds up in many chunks anyway!......If this is going down a bilco door to a basement, or down a full flight of steps, hire a local rigger to do the job....
    It's not in one chunk, Jim. It's on his trailer partly disassembled and is going into the basement through a walkin door at grade.

    Lathes are top heavy. You can tip one over off of dollies, onto its face, in a heartbeat. If anyone gets hurt moving it down a set of stairs, that's a trip to the ER. You can hire a LOT of riggers for a cost of an ER visit.
    You competing for the Captain Oblivious award for the day?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Here is a link to that thread:
    South bend heavy 10 fixable?
    Yikes that poor lathe! I would be pretty upset if I wrecked these machines since they came from my grandfather. I'm so grateful that he left them to me and I will think of him every time I am using them.

  24. #39
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    The 2-volume Machine Practice set by Moltrecht is a good way to get started with machine tools.

    Machine Shop Practice, Vol. 1 (Volume 1): Moltrecht, Karl: 9780831111267: Amazon.com: Books

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    Scott, do you have anyone to physically help you move your lathe? At least having one other person makes it safer and easier. Can you rent a pallet jack? If so, your first post ideas about putting plywood down on your driveway is a good idea and then carefully moving the base onto the pallet jack and putting it in the basement.Stand it up where you can access it. You may need some 4 x 4 pieces of wood to put under the legs of the cabinet to get the engine hoist that you are going to rent or borrow underneath when you use it to pick up the lathe with nylon straps using the webs inside the bed. I would suggest using short eye straps choked at 2 points and make sure you balance it by moving the tailstock and the carriage to distribute the weight as equally as you can. Make sure the tailstock and carriage are locked down. Once you lift it off the trailer you can put it on a piece of plywood on the pallet jack and push it into the basement,or you can leave it rigged to the hoist and roll it in that way, although they don't roll as easy as a pallet jack. Having some knowledgeable help is always a good thing but if you analyze what you are doing and proceed carefully you can do it without damaging the machinery or yourself. If you are not confident in your ability hiring a rigger is not a bad option,but can be expensive. Taking the machine apart is a viable option, but seems like more work than is necessary for this type of machine. Hope this helps. Jim


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