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  1. #1
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    Default OT Looking for Radar Books

    I'm looking to buy a set of books The Rad Lab Series. It's a 27 Volume set that was published in 1947. Written by the Scientists from MIT that developed Radar during WWII. Here's a link to tell you more.

    The MIT Rad Lab Series

    For a set in as nice of condition as the one in the link I would go $800.00

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    That would be a damn fascinating read!

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    I'm a bit curious in why an interest in old radar books. Definitely a bit off topic for a machinist forum. Having said that, did you contact the folks at MIT?

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    Try this link.



    302 Moved


    It will download the PDF






    Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    I'm a bit curious in why an interest in old radar books. Definitely a bit off topic for a machinist forum. Having said that, did you contact the folks at MIT?
    If you read the book about Bell labs and the chapter titled "War Work" you'd learn about the magnetron, waveguides, and all the precise machining that went on for such.
    Last edited by digger doug; 08-26-2021 at 11:08 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    I'm a bit curious in why an interest in old radar books. Definitely a bit off topic for a machinist forum. Having said that, did you contact the folks at MIT?
    Not entirely, no. Manufacturing technology was key to progress.

    Uber precise holes, and rather DEEP in very pure Copper were needed at the outset. UK machinists managed to DO that, but it was sore tedious, and a major barrier to making "many" RADAR sets.

    US folks looked at it, went-over to Copper furnace brazing great stacks of thin Copper sheets PUNCHED to high precision instead.

    And we soon had mass-produced RADAR sets.

    See also high-precision "waveguides". Or the guts of Klystrons and Traveling Wave Tubes.

    Sheet metal, again. Made with dies.
    Same as the punches, those dies had to be machined. Precisely. Very!

    Now... production detail sizes inside a CPU integrated circuit... but the machine to make the machine to make...

    And we are back to "make"?

    See also "nano-technology"

    Manufacturing technology remains key to progress.

    Full circle, in a way?

    Nah. Linear.

    Do it again, better, BIGGER-smaller, faster... and, "Oh, By The Way?"

    CHEAPER, too! Always.

    Made a phone call lately? Driven 75 MPH in air conditioned comfort? Flown across the continent in a matter of hours? Seen scenes play out on-screen from some other PLANET?

    Alexander The Great could not do any of that. Nor Bonaparte.
    No one was powerful enough, nor wealthy enough.

    And yet?

    Most any young kid can enjoy it ALL now..

    Even if not "rich".

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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    I'm a bit curious in why an interest in old radar books. Definitely a bit off topic for a machinist forum. Having said that, did you contact the folks at MIT?
    Couple of reasons. I collect technical books and radar is quite possible the greatest technical achievement of WWII. In less than three years we went from what was effectively radio to automatic fire control of batteries of antiaircraft guns. I have also read that Radar has saved more lives than any other invention in human history. Finely whenever anyone post an electronic question I am always very impressed by the depth of knowledge that is here on electronics. Thought some one could point me in the right direction to find a set. I can collect a set one volume at a time, but would like to get a set in one purchase.

    Haven't contacted MIT but I have sent feelers to used book dealers throughout New England without success.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerholz View Post
    Try this link.

    302 Moved

    It will download the PDF
    That's one volume out of the twenty-seven volumes. and I really dislike reading books on-line.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    That's one volume out of the twenty-seven volumes. and I really dislike reading books on-line.
    "Stack privileges" at a(ny) University with a decent library, "back in the day". and you could park yerazz, read them in-person, not need to make space to-home, nor even carry them very far.

    That's how Paul Miller "bribed" me to enroll at WVU, class of '63... instead of the other many uni's chasing.

    Stack privileges, Day Zero. Before the academic year even started.

    Sign up for an evening course and cut yer deal.

    Save yah about $ 3,000 a year, every year... for very long years.

    Wanna OWN dead-tree books? Yah soon need a pole-barn the size of a decent light-aircraft hangar.

    And then they all ROT!

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    Back in the day - not quite 60 years ago - it was my job to jam the critters

    johnny.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Back in the day - not quite 60 years ago - it was my job to jam the critters

    johnny.jpg
    Were you PIC ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    I'm looking to buy a set of books The Rad Lab Series. It's a 27 Volume set that was published in 1947. Written by the Scientists from MIT that developed Radar during WWII. ...
    ...
    You could consider posting a WTB ad in this forum, the folks there would be my first go-to for items like this:

    Antique Radio Forums • Index page

    want ads section:

    Antique Radio Forums • View forum - Radio Classified :: Read special rules before posting

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Were you PIC ?

    Nope - lowly E5 in back. This ECM version of the "spad" or "AD" had two rear seats essentially in the dark - where all the ECM stuff was controlled

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    You could consider posting a WTB ad in this forum, the folks there would be my first go-to for items like this:

    Antique Radio Forums • Index page

    want ads section:

    Antique Radio Forums • View forum - Radio Classified :: Read special rules before posting
    Thank You Jim, I will do that.

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    Radar has actually been around for longer than you think-
    http://d2xunoxnk3vwmv.cloudfront.net/uploads/radar9.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    Radar has actually been around for longer than you think-
    http://d2xunoxnk3vwmv.cloudfront.net/uploads/radar9.jpg
    This is why I always liked the Flintstones. They had all this technology and all they had to work with was rocks, sticks & dinosaurs.

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    I have a complete set. Not sure I'm willing to let it go for $800. Feel free to PM me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    This is why I always liked the Flintstones. They had all this technology and all they had to work with was rocks, sticks & dinosaurs.
    Varian had a Helluva lot of brains, too.

    ISTR Dorothy was running Varian Data when Day Job was putting 520i and 620i to work for NASA and not-only. One of the first three "minicomputers" I learnt to "dog paddle" in machine code was a re-badged DCi. I surely liked it better than the clunky PDP or the GA SPC-12 & 16.

    Wasn't until we got hands on a "beta' Data General "NOVA" and reverse-engineered it through the night that my Boss could even be made to believe anyone would ever crack the 1 MHz bus clock barrier!

    Didn't have as much fun until the afternoon he asked E-Systems guys why all the PCB"s they wanted us to take-on as second source were marked

    "expendable"!

    Well.. s**t..

    Dinosaurian gets to bite stuff more than just the one time.

    Mark 48 torpedo OTOH, is kinda "consumed in use" as it loses its virginity.
    Sure as Hell the sub commander who fired one never wants it to come home to Mother!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    Couple of reasons. I collect technical books and radar is quite possible the greatest technical achievement of WWII. In less than three years we went from what was effectively radio to automatic fire control of batteries of antiaircraft guns. I have also read that Radar has saved more lives than any other invention in human history. Finely whenever anyone post an electronic question I am always very impressed by the depth of knowledge that is here on electronics. Thought some one could point me in the right direction to find a set. I can collect a set one volume at a time, but would like to get a set in one purchase.

    Haven't contacted MIT but I have sent feelers to used book dealers throughout New England without success.
    If you're an RF or microwave engineer (I am), this set is like the Bible of modern electronics. It's really phenomenal that it was ever even published - this is all of the fundamental theory and much of the practical how-to needed design a radar system of that era (and much of the information holds today). In this day and age, where the most basic things get classified for 20+ years, its amazing that this information wasn't designated as classified. But there was a reason - this was the United States' technological statement to the world that we were and forever would be the leaders of these technologies, that we were the dominant technological force in the world.

    By far, the most interesting book of them all is the last one on "computing mechanisms and linkages". Bear in mind that at the time these systems were developed, simply counting 1's and 0's really fast wasn't considered the universal path forward in computational analysis. This book basically deals with how to build mechanical computers. Its fascinating that they didn't see that we would just take a completely different approach and do the most simple thing possible really fast.

    When people see my set and ask me why I have it, I simply tell them that its art. It is.

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    This place is pretty interesting, and they claim to have the entire Rad Lab series in their collections:

    NATIONAL ELECTRONICS MUSEUM

    I had to the chance to wander through there while waiting for a 'meeting' at a nearby organization. The library there is spectacular and I urge
    anyone who's in the area to visit. There's a LOT of radar-related stuff on display.


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