WANTED - Repulsion/Induction Elect Motor Parts - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Darn I forgot to mention this: if you want to remove all the oxide from those parts, you can immerse them
    in liquid blue soldering flux. It works even cold - we use it frequently at work to clean up copper parts. Best
    if you have an ultrasonic cleaner, parts go in a beaker, flux goes in the beaker, beaker suspended in the
    water bath of the U/S cleaner.
    I put them in my shaker bead machine; it worked ok. Maybe a quick vinegar bath?

  2. #22
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    FWIW, old Delta Unisaw "bullet" motors had a similar spring. It was referred to as a necklace spring. There was a thread on the old woodworking machinery site about making a new spring. It involved buying a spring from McMaster and shortening it to the correct length. Connecting the spring ends was done by soldering a short section of threaded rod screwed into the ID of the spring. As I recall this solution wasn't 100% effective, sometimes the motor wouldn't start, but good enough for the author's vintage, collectible saw.

    The main issue is getting the spring length right so it actuates at the correct rpm. I figured having a CNC lathe to spin the assembly at various rpm's would be ideal.

    When that spring broke on one of my motors I went a local motor re-builder and talked with the oldest employee (semi-retired, around 80 years old). He laughed saying he hadn't seen any of that spring stock available for at least 25 years.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    FWIW, old Delta Unisaw "bullet" motors had a similar spring. It was referred to as a necklace spring. There was a thread on the old woodworking machinery site about making a new spring. It involved buying a spring from McMaster and shortening it to the correct length. Connecting the spring ends was done by soldering a short section of threaded rod screwed into the ID of the spring. As I recall this solution wasn't 100% effective, sometimes the motor wouldn't start, but good enough for the author's vintage, collectible saw.

    The main issue is getting the spring length right so it actuates at the correct rpm. I figured having a CNC lathe to spin the assembly at various rpm's would be ideal.

    When that spring broke on one of my motors I went a local motor re-builder and talked with the oldest employee (semi-retired, around 80 years old). He laughed saying he hadn't seen any of that spring stock available for at least 25 years.
    I'm gonna have to swing by a few of the old timer electric repair shops.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_CNC_guy View Post
    Thanks for that. I read it and some of the others.
    But what is the function of the keys? How do they work?
    I just can't visualize the construction.

    Thanks,
    Pete.
    I liked the simple video too.

    YouTube


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